Last modified on 21 March 2015, at 05:21

George III of the United Kingdom

By God... I will see you righted!
Everyone who does not agree with me is a traitor.
If Jefferson himself were to return, he would find today's government far worse than the government of George III he denounced and helped throw off. ~ Kelley L. Ross

George III (George William Frederick) (June 4, 1738January 29, 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, formed by the union of these two countries, until his death.

QuotesEdit

  • I wish nothing but good; therefore, everyone who does not agree with me is a traitor and a scoundrel.
    • Ketchum, Richard M (1997). Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War. Henry Holt and Company, Inc. p. 65. ISBN 0-8050-4681-X. 

1770sEdit

  • By God, Harrison, I will see you righted!
    • Said ca. 1772, speaking to John Harrison's son William. Quoted in Dava Sobel, Longitude (1995, Fourth Estate Limited. London. Printed 1998. ISBN 1-85702-571-7), p. 147

1780sEdit

  • I was the last to consent to the separation; but the separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power.
    • To John Adams, as quoted in Adams, C.F. (editor) (1850–56), The works of John Adams, second president of the United States, vol. VIII, pp. 255–257, quoted in Ayling, p. 323 and Hibbert, p. 165.


MisattributedEdit

  • "Nothing important happened today." - King George's diary entry, July 4th, 1776, the same day the American colonies declared their independence.

Quotes about George IIIEdit

  • George the Third
    Ought never to have occurred.
    One can only wonder
    At so grotesque a blunder.
  • We I hope shall be left free to avail ourselves of the advantages of neutrality: and yet much I fear the English, or rather their stupid king, will force us out of it. (...) Common sense dictates therefore that they should let us remain neuter: ergo they will not let us remain neuter. I never yet found any other general rule for foretelling what they will do, but that of examining what they ought not to do.
  • he has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating it's most sacred rights of life & liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating & carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.  this piratical warfare, the opprobrium of infidel powers; is the warfare of the Christian king of Great Britain. determined to keep open a market where MEN should be bought & sold he has prostituted his negative for suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or to restrain this execrable commerce: and that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us, and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people upon whom he also obtruded them: thus paying off former crimes committed against the liberties of one people, with crimes which he urges them to commit against the lives of another.
    • Thomas Jefferson, Known as the "anti-slavery clause", this section drafted by Thomas Jefferson was removed from the Declaration at the behest of representatives of South Carolina.[1]

External linksEdit

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