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Louis XIV of France

King of France and Navarra, from 1643 to 1715
Louis XIV of France

Louis XIV of France (baptised as Louis-Dieudonné) (5 September 16381 September 1715) ruled as King of France and of the Navarre from 1643. Louis established the French absolute monarchy and made France the main political power in western Europe in his time.

Contents

QuotesEdit

  • Toutes les fois que je donne une place vacante, je fais cent mécontents et un ingrat.
    • Every time that I fill a high office, I create a hundred discontented men and an ingrate.
      • Quoted in Voltaire, Le Siècle de Louis XIV (1751), ch.26
  • Il n'y a plus de Pyrénées.
    • The Pyrenees have ceased to exist.
      • On his grandson becoming King of Spain, quoted in Voltaire, Le Siècle de Louis XIV (1751), ch.28
  • Je mettrais plutôt toute l'Europe d'accord que deux femmes.
    • I could sooner reconcile all Europe than two women.


DisputedEdit

  • L'Etat, c'est moi.
    • I am the State.
      • Address to the Parliament of Paris; Attr. by weatard-Antoine G, Histoire de Paris (1834), vol.6, p. 298; probably apocryphal.
  • J'ai failli attendre.
    • I almost had to wait.
      • Regarded as apocryphal by E. Fournier, L'Esprit dans l'Histoire (4th ed. 1884). ch.xlviii

AboutEdit

  • For four hundred years the foreign policy of England has been to oppose the strongest, most aggressive, most dominating Power on the Continent, and particularly to prevent the Low Countries from falling into the hands of such a Power. Viewed in the light of history, these four centuries of consistent purpose amid so many changes of names and facts, of circumstances and conditions, must rank as one of the most remarkable episodes which the records of any race, nation, State, or people can show. Moreover, on all occasions England took the more difficult course. Faced by Philip II of Spain, against Louis XIV under William III and Marlborough, against Napoleon, against William II of Germany, it would have been easy and must have been very tempting to join with the stronger and share the fruits of his conquest. However, we always took the harder course, joined with the less strong Powers, and thus defeated and frustrated the Continental military tyrant, whoever he was, whatever nation he lead. Thus we preserved the liberties of Europe, protected the growth of its vivacious and varied society, and emerged after four terrible struggles with an ever-growing fame and widening Empire, and with the Low Countries safely protected in their independence. Her is the wonderful unconscious tradition of British Foreign Policy. All our thoughts rest in that tradition today. I know of nothing which has occurred to alter or weaken the justice, wisdom, valour, and prudence upon which our ancestors acted. I know of nothing that has happened to human nature which in the slightest degree alters the validity of their conclusions. I know of nothing in military, political, economic, or scientific fact which makes me feel that we are less capable. I know of nothing which makes me feel that we might not, or cannot, march along the same road. I venture to put this very general preposition before you because it seems to me that if it is accepted everything else becomes much more simple. Observe that the policy of England takes no account of which nation it is that seeks the overlordship of Europe. The question is not whether it is Spain, or the French Monarchy, or the French Empire, or the German Empire, or the Hitler regime. It has nothing to do with rulers or nations; it is concerned solely with whoever is the strongest or the potentially dominating tyrant. Therefore we should not be afraid of being accused of being pro-French or anti-German. If the circumstances were reversed, we could be equally pro-German and anti-French. It is a law of public policy which we are following, and not a mere expedient dictated by accidental circumstances, or likes and dislikes, or any other sentiment.
    • Winston Churchill, spoken statement (March 1936), Conservative Members' Committee on Foreign Affairs, sited in The Second World War: Volume 1: The Gathering Storm (1948), pp 186-187

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