William III of England

King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1689–1702

William III of England (14 November 16508 March 1702), also known as William II of Scotland and William of Orange, was a Dutch aristocrat and the Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11 April 1689, in each case until his death.

William III by Sir Godfrey Kneller

QuotesEdit

  • Can this last long?
    • Last words, 19 March, 1702; Quoted in: Herbert Lockyer (1969). 700 Final Quotes from the Famous, the Infamous, and the Inspiring Figures of History. p. 83.
    • William III, suffering from a broken collar-bone, was speaking to his physician.

Quotes about William IIIEdit

  • William III. is now termed a scoundrel, but was not James II. a fool? The character of William is generally considered on too small a scale. To estimate it properly, we must remember that Louis XIV. had formed a vast scheme of conquest, which would have overthrown the liberties of all Europe, have subjected even us to the caprice of French priests and French harlots. The extirpation of the Protestant religion, the abolition of all civil privileges, would have been the infallible consequence. I speak of this scheme not as a partisan, but from the most extensive reading and information on the topic. I say that William III. was the first, if not sole cause, of the complete ruin of this plan of tyranny. The English revolution was but a secondary object, the throne a mere step towards the altar of European liberty. William had recourse to all parties merely to serve this great end, for which he often exposed his own life in the field, and was devoured by constant cares in the cabinet.

External linksEdit

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