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Frantz Fanon

Martiniquais writer, psychiatrist, philosopher, revolutionary
The famous dictum which states that all men are equal will find its illustration in the colonies only when the colonized subject states he is equal to the colonist.
When the native hears a speech about Western culture he pulls out his knife—or at least he makes sure it is within reach. The violence with which the supremacy of white values is affirmed and the aggressiveness which has permeated the victory of these values over the ways of life and of thought of the native mean that, in revenge, the native laughs in mockery when Western values are mentioned in front of him.

Frantz Omar Fanon (20 July 19256 December 1961) was a psychiatrist, philosopher, revolutionist and author from Martinique. He was influential in the field of post-colonial studies and was perhaps the pre-eminent thinker of the 20th century on the issue of decolonization and the psychopathology of colonization. His works have inspired anti-colonial liberation movements for more than four decades.

Contents

QuotesEdit

Black Skin, White Masks (1952)Edit

Peau noire, masques blancs

  • "Dirty nigger!" or simply "Look! A Negro!"
    • opening line of chapter 5: "The Lived Experience of the Black Man" (also translated as "The Fact of Blackness" in some editions of the book).
  • I came into this world anxious to uncover the meaning of things, my soul desirous to be at origin of the world, and here I am an object among other objects.
    • "The Lived Experience of the Black Man"/"The Fact of Blackness"
  • At risk of arousing the resentment of my colored brothers, I will say that the black is not a man.

There is a zone of nonbeing, an extraordinary sterile and arid region, an utterly naked declivity where an authentic upheaval can be born. IN most cases, the black man lacks the advantage of being able to accomplish this descent into real hell.

    • Introduction,page 8
  • The black is a black man;that is, as the result of a series of aberrations of affect, he is rooted at the core of a universe from which he must be extricated.
    • Introduction,Page 8
  • Fervor is the weapon of choice of the impotent.
    • Introduction,Page 9
  • The black man wants to be white. The white man slaves to reach a human level.
    • Introduction,Page 9

The Wretched of the Earth (1961)Edit

  • The famous dictum which states that all men are equal will find its illustration in the colonies only when the colonized subject states he is equal to the colonist.
    • as translated by Richard Philcox (2004), p. 9
  • From birth it is clear to him that this narrow world, strewn with prohibitions, can only be called in question by absolute violence.
    • p. 37.
  • The Church in the colonies is the white people’s Church, the foreigner’s Church. She does not call the native to God’s ways but to the ways of the white man, of the master, of the oppressor.
    • p. 42.
  • When the native hears a speech about Western culture he pulls out his knife—or at least he makes sure it is within reach. The violence with which the supremacy of white values is affirmed and the aggressiveness which has permeated the victory of these values over the ways of life and of thought of the native mean that, in revenge, the native laughs in mockery when Western values are mentioned in front of him.
    • p. 43.
  • The living expression of the nation is the collective consciousness in motion of the entire people.

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