Open main menu

Alice in Wonderland (1915 film)

1915 film directed by W.W. Young
Things we do and things
we see shortly before
we fall asleep are most
apt to influence our
dreams.

Alice in Wonderland is a 1915 silent film adaptation of Lewis Carroll's classic novel, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.  This film version is notable for depicting various stanzas of the 'Father William' poem and including footage resembling Tenniel's illustration of Father William doing his back-somersault at the front door.  The film has ascended into the public domain.

Adapted and directed by W. W. Young.

Contents

IntertitlesEdit

  • She made some tarts
    All on a summer's day.
    • Opening intertitle.
  • Things we do and things
    we see shortly before
    we fall asleep are most
    apt to influence our
    dreams.
  • Alice

    enters

    Dreamland.

  • The rabbit hole.
  • Down she came upon
    a heap of sticks and
    dry leaves.
  • Doors all round and all
    locked. She wondered how
    she was ever to get out
    • C.f. "Down the Rabbit-Hole," ch. 1 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 7:
      There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.
  • She looked along a
    passage into the
    lovliest garden you
    ever saw.

    • C.f. "Down the Rabbit-Hole," ch. 1 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 8:
      Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw.
  • But she couldn't get
    through so she cried,
    and cried, and then---
  • Birds and Beasts
    start to the Animal
    Convention.

  • And as she wandered on
    Alice thought about other
    children she knew who
    might do very well as
    pigs, till suddenly she
    came upon the Cheshire
    Cat.
  • The croquet-balls were
    hedgehogs, the mallets
    were flamingoes and
    the arches were soldiers.
    • C.f. "The Queen's Croquet-Ground," ch. 8 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 121:
      Alice thought she had never seen such a curious croquet-ground in her life: it was all ridges and furrows; the croquet-balls were live hedgehogs, and the mallets live flamingoes, and the soldiers had to double themselves up and stand on their hands and feet, to make the arches.
  • "Come on," said the Gryphon.
    Everybody says "Come on"
    here, thought Alice. I never
    was so ordered about in
    all my life.
    • C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 139:
      "Why, she," said the Gryphon.  "It's all her fancy, that: they never executes nobody, you know.  Come on!"
      "Everybody says 'come on!' here," thought Alice, as she went slowly after it: "I never was so ordered about before, in all my life, never!"

AliceEdit

 
"O, Mouse, do you know the
way out? I'm afraid I shall
drown in my tears."
To the Dormouse
  • O, Mouse, do you know the
    way out? I'm afraid I shall
    drown in my tears.
    • C.f. "The Pool of Tears," ch. 2 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), pp. 2324:
      "I wish I hadn't cried so much!" said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out.  "I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears!  That will be a queer thing, to be sure!  However, everything is queer to-day."
To the attendees of the Animal Convention
  • I wish my cat were
    here. She's such a
    capital one for catching
    mice.

  • And oh! I wish you
    could see her after the
    birds.

  • I wish I hadn't talked
    so much about our cat,
    nobody seems to like her
    down here.

    • C.f. "A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale," ch. 3 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), pp. 3940:
      "Dinah's our cat.  And she's such a capital one for catching mice, you can't think!  And oh, I wish you could see her after the birds!  Why, she'll eat a little bird as soon as look at it!"
      "I wish I hadn't mentioned Dinah!" she said to herself in a melancholy tone.  "Nobody seems to like her, down here, and I'm sure she's the best cat in the world!  Oh, my dear Dinah!  I wonder if I shall ever see you any more!"
To herself
  • To much pepper in the
    soup--and in the air.
    • C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 81:
      "There's certainly too much pepper in that soup!" Alice said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing.
  • If it had grown up it
    would have made a
    dreadfully ugly child;
    but it makes rather a
    handsome pig.
    • This statement refers to the Duchess's baby.
  • Well! I've often seen
    a cat without a grin:
    but never before a
    grin without a cat!
    • C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 94:
      "Well!  I've often seen a cat without a grin," thought Alice; "but a grin without a cat!  It's the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!"

MouseEdit

To Alice
  • The Dodo told
    me the best thing to get
    one dry is a Caucus race.

    • C.f. "A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale," ch. 3 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 32:
      "What I was going to say," said the Dodo in an offended tone, "was, that the best thing to get us dry would be a Caucus-race."

White RabbitEdit

To Alice
  • What have you done
    with my fan and gloves?

  • The Duchess!  She'll
    have me executed.

    • C.f. "The Pool of Tears," ch. 2 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 18:
      It was the White Rabbit returning, splendidly dressed, with a pair of white kid gloves in one hand and a large fan in the other: he came trotting along in a great hurry, muttering to himself as he came, "Oh! the Duchess, the Duchess!  Oh! won't she be savage if I've kept her waiting!"
Reading the accusation

The DuchessEdit

To Alice
  • It's a Cheshire cat
    and that's why it grins.
    • C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 82:
      "Please would you tell me," said Alice, a little timidly, for she was not quite sure whether it was good manners for her to speak first, "why your cat grins like that?"

      "It's a Cheshire cat," said the Duchess, "and that's why.  Pig!"

The Duchess's Lullaby

The Queen of HeartsEdit

  • Off with her head!
    • Referring to Alice.
  • Off with their heads!
    • Referring to the gardeners.
  • Off with everybody's

    head!

The Mock TurtleEdit

Turtle Soup
To Alice
  • Once I was--boo hoo--

    a real Turtle

    --boo hoo, boo hoo!

    • C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 140:
      "Once," said the Mock Turtle at last, with a deep sigh, "I was a real Turtle."
      These words were followed by a very long silence, broken only by an occasional exclamation of "Hjckrrh!" from the Gryphon, and the constant heavy sobbing of the Mock Turtle.
  • When I was little we went to
    school in the sea and the
    master was an old Turtle--
    we used to call him
    Tortoise, because he
    taught us--boo-hoo!
    • C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), pp. 141142:
      "When we were little," the Mock Turtle went on at last, more calmly, though still sobbing a little now and then, "we went to school in the sea.  The master was an old Turtle—we used to call him Tortoise—"
      "Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn't one?" Alice asked.
      "We called him Tortoise, because he taught us," said the Mock Turtle angrily; "really you are very dull!"
  • I took up Reeling and
    Writhing, and the different
    branches of Arithmetic---
    Ambition, Distraction,
    Uglification and Derision.
    • C.f. "The Mock Turtle's Story," ch. 9 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), p. 143:
      "Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with," the Mock Turtle replied: "and then the different branches of Arithmetic—Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision."

DialogueEdit

The Caterpillar
Who are you?
Alice
I hardly know, Sir. I know
who I was, but I think I
must have changed.
The Caterpillar
Explain yourself, Miss,
Alice
I cannot explain myself,
Sir, because I'm not
myself, you see.
Alice
I can't remember
things as I used.
The Caterpillar
Try repeating
"You are old,
Father William."
Alice

"You are old, father William,"

the young man said,

"And your hair has become

very white;

And yet you incessantly

stand on your head--

Do you think, at your age,

it is right?"

Alice

"You are old," said the youth

"as I mentioned before,

And have grown most

uncommonly fat;

Yet you turned a back-

somersault in at the door

Pray, what is the

reason of that?"

Alice

"You are old," said the youth, "one

would hardly suppose

That your eye was as steady as ever;

Yet you balanced an eel on the

end of your nose

What made you so awfully clever?"

The Caterpillar
You spoke that wrong
from beginning to end!
The Caterpillar

You didn't speak the verse

I like best. It goes like this:

In my Youth, said

the father,

I took to the law

And argued each

case with my wife,

The Caterpillar

And the muscular strength

Which it gave to my jaw

Has lasted the rest of my life."


 
"That depends on
where you want to go."
Alice
Tell me, please which
way I ought to go.
The Cheshire Cat
That depends on
where you want to go.
Alice
I don't much care.
The Cheshire Cat
Then it doesn't matter
which way you go.
Alice
So long as I
get somewhere.
The Cheshire Cat
You're sure to do
that if you only
walk long enough.
The Cheshire Cat
What became of the baby?
Alice
It turned into a pig.
The Cheshire Cat
I thought it would.
The Cheshire Cat
Did you say pig or fig.
Alice
I said pig and I wish
you wouldn't keep
appearing and vanishing;
you make me giddy. I'm
going to visit the March Hare.
  • C.f. "Pig and Pepper," ch. 6 of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (London: Macmillan and Co., 1866), pp. 8990, 92.  Lines altered from the original.

Alice
Why are you painting
those roses?
Gardeners
Because we planted
a white rose tree by
mistake and the Queen
will cut off our heads
if they are not red.

CastEdit

External linksEdit