The Man Who Was Thursday

They twisted even decent sin to shapes not to be named: Men were ashamed of honour; but we were not ashamed.

The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare (1908), by G. K. Chesterton, is a novel that deals in an allegorical fashion with a group of conspirators promoting nihilistic anarchism to explore many questions of free will, the existence of evil, and various forms of manipulation and intrigue. It has been referred to as a metaphysical thriller.

A cloud was on the mind of men, and wailing went the weather,
Yea, a sick cloud upon the soul when we were boys together.
The Green Carnation withered, as in forest fires that pass,
Roared in the wind of all the world ten million leaves of grass
What huge devils hid the stars, yet fell at a pistol flash.

QuotesEdit

First of all, what is it really all about? What is it you object to?
Full text online at Wikisource (chapter titles here also link to chapters at Wikisource)
Our belief has been slandered, it has been disfigured, it has been utterly confused and concealed, but it has never been altered.
Perhaps we are both doing what we think right. But what we think right is so damned different that there can be nothing between us in the way of concession.
No one has any experience of the battle of Armageddon. … I am sending you to your death. Good day.
The one thing that can never be told is the last notion of the President… he is carrying out his notion of concealing ourselves by not concealing ourselves to the most extraordinary lengths just now…
They say we are a lot of jolly gentlemen who pretend they are anarchists.
They might have called Sunday the super-man. If any such creature be conceivable, he looked, indeed, somewhat like it, with his earth-shaking abstraction, as of a stone statue walking.
The devils might have captured heaven, but they had not yet captured the cross.
Sunday is a fixed star

To Edmund Clerihew BentleyEdit

Dedicatory poem, "To Edmund Clerihew Bentley"
  • A cloud was on the mind of men, and wailing went the weather,
    Yea, a sick cloud upon the soul when we were boys together.

    Science announced nonentity and art admired decay;
    The world was old and ended: but you and I were gay;
    Round us in antic order their crippled vices came —
    Lust that had lost its laughter, fear that had lost its shame.
  • Life was a fly that faded, and death a drone that stung;
    The world was very old indeed when you and I were young.

    They twisted even decent sin to shapes not to be named:
    Men were ashamed of honour; but we were not ashamed.
  • This is a tale of those old fears, even of those emptied hells,
    And none but you shall understand the true thing that it tells —
    Of what colossal gods of shame could cow men and yet crash,
    Of what huge devils hid the stars, yet fell at a pistol flash.

    The doubts that were so plain to chase, so dreadful to withstand—
    Oh, who shall understand but you; yea, who shall understand?
    The doubts that drove us through the night as we two talked amain,
    And day had broken on the streets e'er it broke upon the brain.
    Between us, by the peace of God, such truth can now be told;
    Yea, there is strength in striking root and good in growing old.
    We have found common things at last and marriage and a creed,
    And I may safely write it now, and you may safely read.

Ch. I : The Two Poets of Saffron ParkEdit

  • This particular evening, if it is remembered for nothing else, will be remembered in that place for its strange sunset. It looked like the end of the world. All the heaven seemed covered with a quite vivid and palpable plumage; you could only say that the sky was full of feathers, and of feathers that almost brushed the face. Across the great part of the dome they were grey, with the strangest tints of violet and mauve and an unnatural pink or pale green; but towards the west the whole grew past description, transparent and passionate, and the last red-hot plumes of it covered up the sun like something too good to be seen. The whole was so close about the earth, as to express nothing but a violent secrecy. The very empyrean seemed to be a secret. It expressed that splendid smallness which is the soul of local patriotism. The very sky seemed small.
    I say that there are some inhabitants who may remember the evening if only by that oppressive sky.

Ch. II : The Secret of Gabriel SymeEdit

  • "First of all, what is it really all about? What is it you object to? You want to abolish Government?"
    "To abolish God!" said Gregory, opening the eyes of a fanatic. "We do not only want to upset a few despotisms and police regulations; that sort of anarchism does exist, but it is a mere branch of the Nonconformists. We dig deeper and we blow you higher. We wish to deny all those arbitrary distinctions of vice and virtue, honour and treachery, upon which mere rebels base themselves. The silly sentimentalists of the French Revolution talked of the Rights of Man! We hate Rights as we hate Wrongs. We have abolished Right and Wrong."
    "And Right and Left," said Syme with a simple eagerness, "I hope you will abolish them too. They are much more troublesome to me."
    • Dialogue between Syme and Gregory

Ch. III : The Man Who Was ThursdayEdit

  • As you know, his death was as self-denying as his life, for he died through his faith in a hygienic mixture of chalk and water as a substitute for milk, which substance he regarded as barbaric, and as involving cruelty to the cow.
    • Comrade Buttons, on the death of the previous Thursday
  • Our belief has been slandered, it has been disfigured, it has been utterly confused and concealed, but it has never been altered. Those who talk about anarchism and its dangers go everywhere and anywhere to get their information, except to us, except to the fountain head. They learn about anarchists from sixpenny novels; they learn about anarchists from tradesmen's newspapers; they learn about anarchists from Ally Sloper's Half-Holiday and the Sporting Times. They never learn about anarchists from anarchists. We have no chance of denying the mountainous slanders which are heaped upon our heads from one end of Europe to another. The man who has always heard that we are walking plagues has never heard our reply. I know that he will not hear it tonight, though my passion were to rend the roof. For it is deep, deep under the earth that the persecuted are permitted to assemble, as the Christians assembled in the Catacombs.
    • Gregory
  • Perhaps we are both doing what we think right. But what we think right is so damned different that there can be nothing between us in the way of concession. There is nothing possible between us but honour and death.
    • Syme to Gregory

Ch. IV : The Tale of a DetectiveEdit

  • Gabriel Syme was not merely a detective who pretended to be a poet; he was really a poet who had become a detective. Nor was his hatred of anarchy hypocritical. He was one of those who are driven early in life into too conservative an attitude by the bewildering folly of most revolutionists. He had not attained it by any tame tradition. His respectability was spontaneous and sudden, a rebellion against rebellion.
  • We say that the most dangerous criminal now is the entirely lawless modern philosopher. Compared to him, burglars and bigamists are essentially moral men; my heart goes out to them. They accept the essential ideal of man; they merely seek it wrongly. Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it. But philosophers dislike property as property; they wish to destroy the very idea of personal possession.
    • A Policeman and Gabriel Syme
  • I have the honour to be somewhat in the confidence of the chief of whom I have spoken. You should really come and see him. Or rather, I should not say see him, nobody ever sees him; but you can talk to him if you like.
    • A Policeman and Gabriel Syme
  • "You are the new recruit? All right, you are engaged."
    "I really have no experience..."
    "No one has any experience of the battle of Armageddon."
    "But I'm really unfit..."
    "You are willing, that is enough."
    "Now, really, I know of no occupation for which mere willingness is the final test."
    "I do. Martyrs. I am sending you to your death. Good day."
    • The Police Chief and Gabriel Syme
  • He walked on the Embankment once under a dark red sunset. The red river reflected the red sky, and they both reflected his anger. The sky, indeed, was so swarthy, and the light on the river relatively so lurid, that the water almost seemed of fiercer flame than the sunset it mirrored. It looked like a stream of literal fire winding under the vast caverns of a subterranean country.

Ch. V : The Feast of FearEdit

  • The one thing that can never be told is the last notion of the President, for his notions grow like a tropical forest. So in case you don't know, I'd better tell you that he is carrying out his notion of concealing ourselves by not concealing ourselves to the most extraordinary lengths just now. Originally, of course, we met in a cell underground, just as your branch does. Then Sunday made us take a private room at an ordinary restaurant. He said that if you didn't seem to be hiding nobody hunted you out. Well, he is the only man on earth, I know; but sometimes I really think that his huge brain is going a little mad in its old age. For now we flaunt ourselves before the public. We have our breakfast on a balcony — on a balcony, if you please — overlooking Leicester Square."
    "And what do the people say?" asked Syme.
    "It's quite simple what they say," answered his guide.
    "They say we are a lot of jolly gentlemen who pretend they are anarchists."
    • This to some extent evokes the question of Jesus to his disciples in the Gospel of Luke 9:18: Whom do the people say that I am? (Douay-Rheims translation)
  • "A man's brain is a bomb," he cried out, loosening suddenly his strange passion and striking his own skull with violence. "My brain feels like a bomb, night and day. It must expand! It must expand! A man's brain must expand, if it breaks up the universe."
    "I don't want the universe broken up just yet," drawled the Marquis. "I want to do a lot of beastly things before I die. I thought of one yesterday in bed."
  • "No, if the only end of the thing is nothing," said Dr. Bull with his sphinx-like smile, "it hardly seems worth doing."
    The old Professor was staring at the ceiling with dull eyes.
    "Every man knows in his heart," he said, "that nothing is worth doing."

Ch. VI : The ExposureEdit

  • It never occurred to him to be spiritually won over to the enemy. Many moderns, inured to a weak worship of intellect and force, might have wavered in their allegiance under this oppression of a great personality. They might have called Sunday the super-man. If any such creature be conceivable, he looked, indeed, somewhat like it, with his earth-shaking abstraction, as of a stone statue walking. He might have been called something above man, with his large plans, which were too obvious to be detected, with his large face, which was too frank to be understood. But this was a kind of modern meanness to which Syme could not sink even in his extreme morbidity. Like any man, he was coward enough to fear great force; but he was not quite coward enough to admire it.

Ch. VII : The Unaccountable Conduct of Professor De WormsEdit

  • It seemed a symbol of human faith and valour that while the skies were darkening that high place of the earth was bright. The devils might have captured heaven, but they had not yet captured the cross. He had a new impulse to tear out the secret of this dancing, jumping and pursuing paralytic; and at the entrance of the court as it opened upon the Circus he turned, stick in hand, to face his pursuer.
  • "Sunday is a fixed star," he said.
    "You shall see him a falling star," said Syme, and put on his hat.
    The decision of his gesture drew the Professor vaguely to his feet.
    "Have you any idea," he asked, with a sort of benevolent bewilderment, "exactly where you are going?"
    "Yes," replied Syme shortly, "I am going to prevent this bomb being thrown in Paris."

Ch. VIII : The Professor ExplainsEdit

Through all this ordeal his root horror had been isolation, and there are no words to express the abyss between isolation and having one ally.
Always be comic in a tragedy. What the deuce else can you do?
Idiots that we are, he planned the whole of our idiocies!
Was anyone wearing a mask? Was anyone anything?
Was not everything, after all, like this bewildering woodland, this dance of dark and light? Everything only a glimpse, the glimpse always unforeseen, and always forgotten.
  • Syme had for a flash the sensation that the cosmos had turned exactly upside down, that all trees were growing downwards and that all stars were under his feet. Then came slowly the opposite conviction. For the last twenty-four hours the cosmos had really been upside down, but now the capsized universe had come right side up again. This devil from whom he had been fleeing all day was only an elder brother of his own house, who on the other side of the table lay back and laughed at him. He did not for the moment ask any questions of detail; he only knew the happy and silly fact that this shadow, which had pursued him with an intolerable oppression of peril, was only the shadow of a friend trying to catch him up. He knew simultaneously that he was a fool and a free man. For with any recovery from morbidity there must go a certain healthy humiliation. There comes a certain point in such conditions when only three things are possible: first a perpetuation of Satanic pride, secondly tears, and third laughter. Syme's egotism held hard to the first course for a few seconds, and then suddenly adopted the third. Taking his own blue police ticket from his own waist coat pocket, he tossed it on to the table; then he flung his head back until his spike of yellow beard almost pointed at the ceiling, and shouted with a barbaric laughter.
  • Through all this ordeal his root horror had been isolation, and there are no words to express the abyss between isolation and having one ally. It may be conceded to the mathematicians that four is twice two. But two is not twice one; two is two thousand times one. That is why, in spite of a hundred disadvantages, the world will always return to monogamy.
  • Syme was able to pour out for the first time the whole of his outrageous tale, from the time when Gregory had taken him to the little tavern by the river. He did it idly and amply, in a luxuriant monologue, as a man speaks with very old friends. On his side, also, the man who had impersonated Professor de Worms was not less communicative. His own story was almost as silly as Syme's.
  • Gogol was an idealist. He made up as the abstract or platonic ideal of an anarchist. But I am a realist. I am a portrait painter. But, indeed, to say that I am a portrait painter is an inadequate expression. I am a portrait."
    "I don't understand you," said Syme.
    "I am a portrait," repeated the Professor. "I am a portrait of the celebrated Professor de Worms, who is, I believe, in Naples."
  • Then he tried to blast my claims intellectually. I countered that by a very simple dodge. Whenever he said something that nobody but he could understand, I replied with something which I could not even understand myself.

Ch. IX : The Man in SpectaclesEdit

  • "Do you understand," said the other, "that this is a tragedy?"
    "Perfectly," replied Syme; "always be comic in a tragedy. What the deuce else can you do?"

Ch. X: The DuelEdit

  • "Don't you know Sunday? Don't you know that his jokes are always so big and simple that one has never thought of them? Can you think of anything more like Sunday than this, that he should put all his powerful enemies on the Supreme Council, and then take care that it was not supreme? I tell you he has bought every trust, he has captured every cable, he has control of every railway line — especially of that railway line!" and he pointed a shaking finger towards the small wayside station. "The whole movement was controlled by him; half the world was ready to rise for him. But there were just five people, perhaps, who would have resisted him … and the old devil put them on the Supreme Council, to waste their time in watching each other. Idiots that we are, he planned the whole of our idiocies!"

Ch. XI : The Criminals Chase the PoliceEdit

  • Was anyone wearing a mask? Was anyone anything? This wood of witchery, in which men's faces turned black and white by turns, in which their figures first swelled into sunlight and then faded into formless night, this mere chaos of chiaroscuro (after the clear daylight outside), seemed to Syme a perfect symbol of the world in which he had been moving for three days, this world where men took off their beards and their spectacles and their noses, and turned into other people. That tragic self-confidence which he had felt when he believed that the Marquis was a devil had strangely disappeared now that he knew that the Marquis was a friend. He felt almost inclined to ask after all these bewilderments what was a friend and what an enemy. Was there anything that was apart from what it seemed? The Marquis had taken off his nose and turned out to be a detective. Might he not just as well take off his head and turn out to be a hobgoblin? Was not everything, after all, like this bewildering woodland, this dance of dark and light? Everything only a glimpse, the glimpse always unforeseen, and always forgotten. For Gabriel Syme had found in the heart of that sun-splashed wood what many modern painters had found there. He had found the thing which the modern people call Impressionism, which is another name for that final scepticism which can find no floor to the universe.

Ch. XII : The Earth in AnarchyEdit

  • Four out of the five rich men in this town … are common swindlers. I suppose the proportion is pretty equal all over the world.
  • I have a suspicion that you are all mad … but God forbid that madness should in any way interrupt friendship.
  • You are a very fine fellow … You can believe in a sanity which is not merely your sanity.
  • When duty and religion are really destroyed, it will be by the rich.
  • We were all a lot of silly policemen looking at each other. And all these nice people who have been peppering us with shot thought we were the dynamiters.
  • Vulgar people are never mad. I'm vulgar myself, and I know. I am now going on shore to stand a drink to everybody here.

Ch. XIII : The Pursuit of the PresidentEdit

You will understand the sea, and I shall be still a riddle; you shall know what the stars are, and not know what I am.
I am the man in the dark room, who made you all policemen.
I sat in the darkness, where there is not any created thing, and to you I was only a voice commanding valour and an unnatural virtue.
Moderate strength is shown in violence, supreme strength is shown in levity.
I am not reconciled.
I can forgive God His anger, though it destroyed nations; but I cannot forgive Him His peace.
It is not true that we have never descended from these thrones. We have descended into hell.
Can ye drink of the cup that I drink of?
Dawn was breaking over everything in colours at once clear and timid…
  • "We're all spies!" shouted Dr. Bull. "Come and have a drink."
    Next morning the battalion of the reunited six marched stolidly towards the hotel in Leicester Square.
    "This is more cheerful," said Dr. Bull; "we are six men going to ask one man what he means."
    "I think it is a bit queerer than that," said Syme. "I think it is six men going to ask one man what they mean."
  • There's one thing I'll tell you though about who I am. I am the man in the dark room, who made you all policemen.
    • The President
  • "Look!" shouted Syme suddenly. "Look over there!"
    "Look at what?" asked the Secretary savagely.
    "Look at the captive balloon!" said Syme, and pointed in a frenzy.
    "Why the blazes should I look at a captive balloon?" demanded the Secretary. "What is there queer about a captive balloon?"
    "Nothing," said Syme, "except that it isn't captive!"

Ch. XIV : The Six PhilosophersEdit

  • "What!" cried the Secretary bitterly. "Do you believe all that tale about his being our man in the dark room? Sunday would say he was anybody."
    "I don't know whether I believe it or not," said Dr. Bull. "But it isn't that that I mean. I can't wish old Sunday's balloon to burst because —"
    "Well," said Syme impatiently, "because?"
    "Well, because he's so jolly like a balloon himself," said Dr. Bull desperately. "I don't understand a word of all that idea of his being the same man who gave us all our blue cards. It seems to make everything nonsense. But I don't care who knows it, I always had a sympathy for old Sunday himself, wicked as he was. Just as if he was a great bouncing baby. How can I explain what my queer sympathy was? It didn't prevent my fighting him like hell! Shall I make it clear if I say that I liked him because he was so fat?"
    "You will not," said the Secretary.
    "I've got it now," cried Bull, "it was because he was so fat and so light. Just like a balloon. We always think of fat people as heavy, but he could have danced against a sylph. I see now what I mean. Moderate strength is shown in violence, supreme strength is shown in levity. It was like the old speculations — what would happen if an elephant could leap up in the sky like a grasshopper?"
    "Our elephant," said Syme, looking upwards, "has leapt into the sky like a grasshopper."
    "And somehow," concluded Bull, "that's why I can't help liking old Sunday. No, it's not an admiration of force, or any silly thing like that. There is a kind of gaiety in the thing, as if he were bursting with some good news. Haven't you sometimes felt it on a spring day? You know Nature plays tricks, but somehow that day proves they are good-natured tricks. I never read the Bible myself, but that part they laugh at is literal truth, 'Why leap ye, ye high hills?' The hills do leap — at least, they try to.... Why do I like Sunday?... how can I tell you?... because he's such a Bounder."
  • That has been for me the mystery of Sunday, and it is also the mystery of the world. When I see the horrible back, I am sure the noble face is but a mask. When I see the face but for an instant, I know the back is only a jest.
  • I was suddenly possessed with the idea that the blind, blank back of his head really was his face — an awful, eyeless face staring at me! And I fancied that the figure running in front of me was really a figure running backwards, and dancing as he ran.
  • Shall I tell you the secret of the whole world? It is that we have only known the back of the world. We see everything from behind, and it looks brutal. That is not a tree, but the back of a tree. That is not a cloud, but the back of a cloud. Cannot you see that everything is stooping and hiding a face? If we could only get round in front —
  • The man called Gogol, who had hardly spoken through all their weary travels, suddenly threw up his hands like a lost spirit.
    "He is dead!" he cried. "And now I know he was my friend — my friend in the dark!"
    "Dead!" snorted the Secretary. "You will not find him dead easily. If he has been tipped out of the car, we shall find him rolling as a colt rolls in a field, kicking his legs for fun."
    "Clashing his hoofs," said the Professor. "The colts do, and so did Pan."
    "Pan again!" said Dr. Bull irritably. "You seem to think Pan is everything."
    "So he is," said the Professor, "in Greek. He means everything."
    "Don't forget," said the Secretary, looking down, "that he also means Panic."

Ch. XV : The AccuserEdit

  • If the Secretary stood for that philosopher who loves the original and formless light, Syme was a type of the poet who seeks always to make the light in special shapes, to split it up into sun and star. The philosopher may sometimes love the infinite; the poet always loves the finite. For him the great moment is not the creation of light, but the creation of the sun and moon.
  • Let us remain together a little, we who have loved each other so sadly, and have fought so long. I seem to remember only centuries of heroic war, in which you were always heroes — epic on epic, iliad on iliad, and you always brothers in arms. Whether it was but recently (for time is nothing), or at the beginning of the world, I sent you out to war. I sat in the darkness, where there is not any created thing, and to you I was only a voice commanding valour and an unnatural virtue. You heard the voice in the dark, and you never heard it again. The sun in heaven denied it, the earth and sky denied it, all human wisdom denied it. And when I met you in the daylight I denied it myself.
    • Sunday
  • I know you are contentment, optimism, what do they call the thing, an ultimate reconciliation. Well, I am not reconciled. If you were the man in the dark room, why were you also Sunday, an offense to the sunlight? If you were from the first our father and our friend, why were you also our greatest enemy? We wept, we fled in terror; the iron entered into our souls — and you are the peace of God! Oh, I can forgive God His anger, though it destroyed nations; but I cannot forgive Him His peace.
    • The Secretary
  • "'Now there was a day,'" murmured Bull, who seemed really to have fallen asleep, "'when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan came also among them.'"
  • "I see everything," he cried, "everything that there is. Why does each thing on the earth war against each other thing? Why does each small thing in the world have to fight against the world itself? Why does a fly have to fight the whole universe? Why does a dandelion have to fight the whole universe? For the same reason that I had to be alone in the dreadful Council of the Days. So that each thing that obeys law may have the glory and isolation of the anarchist. So that each man fighting for order may be as brave and good a man as the dynamiter. So that the real lie of Satan may be flung back in the face of this blasphemer, so that by tears and torture we may earn the right to say to this man, 'You lie!' No agonies can be too great to buy the right to say to this accuser, "We also have suffered."
    "It is not true that we have never been broken. We have been broken upon the wheel. It is not true that we have never descended from these thrones. We have descended into hell. We were complaining of unforgettable miseries even at the very moment when this man entered insolently to accuse us of happiness. I repel the slander; we have not been happy. I can answer for every one of the great guards of Law whom he has accused. At least —"
    He had turned his eyes so as to see suddenly the great face of Sunday, which wore a strange smile.
    "Have you," he cried in a dreadful voice, "have you ever suffered?"
    As he gazed, the great face grew to an awful size, grew larger than the colossal mask of Memnon, which had made him scream as a child. It grew larger and larger, filling the whole sky; then everything went black. Only in the blackness before it entirely destroyed his brain he seemed to hear a distant voice saying a commonplace text that he had heard somewhere, "Can ye drink of the cup that I drink of?"
  • When men in books awake from a vision, they commonly find themselves in some place in which they might have fallen asleep; they yawn in a chair, or lift themselves with bruised limbs from a field. Syme's experience was something much more psychologically strange if there was indeed anything unreal, in the earthly sense, about the things he had gone through. For while he could always remember afterwards that he had swooned before the face of Sunday, he could not remember having ever come to at all.
  • Dawn was breaking over everything in colours at once clear and timid; as if Nature made a first attempt at yellow and a first attempt at rose. A breeze blew so clean and sweet, that one could not think that it blew from the sky; it blew rather through some hole in the sky.

Quotes about The Man Who Was ThursdayEdit

One of the hidden hinges of twentieth-century writing, the place where, before our eyes, the nonsense-fantastical tradition of Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear pivots and becomes the nightmare-fantastical tradition of Kafka and Borges. ~ Adam Gopnik
  • At first glance, The Man Who Was Thursday is a detective story filled with poetry and politics. But it is mystery that grows more mysterious, until it is nothing less than the mystery of creation itself.
    This is Chesterton’s most famous novel. Never out of print since it was first published in 1908, critics immediately hailed it as “amazingly clever,” “a remarkable acrobatic performance”, and “a scurrying, door-slamming farce that ends like a chapter in the Apocalypse.” One reviewer described how he had read it in one sitting and put it down, “completely dazed.” Thirty years later, Orson Welles called it “shamelessly beautiful prose” and made a radio dramatization of it with his Mercury Radio Theater of the Air. … this story is not to be compared with the biblical book of Revelation, but rather with the book of Job, the book which Chesterton considered the greatest riddle in all of literature. And even if you know that going in, it won’t help you one bit. … This book is Chesterton at his best.
  • One of the hidden hinges of twentieth-century writing, the place where, before our eyes, the nonsense-fantastical tradition of Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear pivots and becomes the nightmare-fantastical tradition of Kafka and Borges.
    • Adam Gopnik, in "The Back of the World : The Troubling Genius of G.K. Chesterton" in The New Yorker (7 July 2008), p. 52

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to:
Last modified on 27 January 2014, at 18:29