Last modified on 30 October 2014, at 16:25

Leaves of Grass

To me the converging objects of the universe perpetually flow, All are written to me, and I must get what the writing means.

Leaves of Grass (First edition 1855; final edition 1892) is a book of poetry by Walt Whitman. Whitman revised and rearranged his masterwork many times after the first edition of 1855. These selections are arranged in the sequence in which they were presented in the final edition of 1892, with some additional material from earlier editions and Whitman's manuscripts occasionally supplementing it.

In all people I see myself, none more and not one a barley-corn less, And the good or bad I say of myself I say of them...
Seeing, hearing, feeling, are miracles, and each part and tag of me is a miracle.
Divine am I inside and out, and I make holy whatever I touch or am touch'd from...

Prefatory NoteEdit

  • Ever and ever yet the verses owning — as, first, I here and now
    Signing for Soul and Body, set to them my name,
    Walt Whitman
    • Prefatory Note to "Leaves of Grass" in some editions.


INSCRIPTIONSEdit

One's-self I sing, a simple separate person…
The Female equally with the Male I sing.


  • One's-self I sing, a simple separate person,
    Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse.
    The Female equally with the Male I sing.
    Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power,
    Cheerful, for freest action form'd under the laws divine,
    The Modern Man I sing.
    • One's-Self I Sing (1867; 1871)


I too haughty Shade also sing war, and a longer and greater one than any...
  • I too haughty Shade also sing war, and a longer and greater one than any,
    Waged in my book with varying fortune, with flight, advance and retreat, victory deferr'd and wavering,
    (Yet methinks certain, or as good as certain, at the last,) the field the world,
    For life and death, for the Body and for the eternal Soul,
    Lo, I too am come, chanting the chant of battles,
    I above all promote brave soldiers.
    • As I Ponder'd in Silence (1871)


  • Then falter not O book, fulfil your destiny,
    You not a reminiscence of the land alone,
    You too as a lone bark cleaving the ether, purpos'd I know not whither, yet ever full of faith,
    Consort to every ship that sails, sail you!
    Bear forth to them folded my love, (dear mariners, for you I fold it here in every leaf;)
    Speed on my book! spread your white sails my little bark athwart the imperious waves,
    Chant on, sail on, bear o'er the boundless blue from me to every sea,
    This song for mariners and all their ships.
    • In Cabin'd Ships at Sea (1871)


To thee old cause! Thou peerless, passionate, good cause, thou stern, remorseless, sweet idea, deathless throughout the ages, races, lands...
  • Chanter of Personality, outlining what is yet to be,
    I project the history of the future.
    • To a Historian (1860; 1871)


I met a seer, passing the hues and objects of the world, the fields of art and learning, pleasure, sense, to glean eidolons.
  • To thee old cause!
    Thou peerless, passionate, good cause,
    Thou stern, remorseless, sweet idea,
    Deathless throughout the ages, races, lands,

    After a strange sad war, great war for thee,
    (I think all war through time was really fought, and ever will be really fought, for thee,)
    These chants for thee, the eternal march of thee.
    • To Thee Old Cause (1871; 1881)


Put first before the rest as light for all and entrance-song of all, that of eidolons.
  • I met a seer,
    Passing the hues and objects of the world,
    The fields of art and learning, pleasure, sense,
    To glean eidolons.

    Put in thy chants said he,
    No more the puzzling hour nor day, nor segments, parts, put in,
    Put first before the rest as light for all and entrance-song of all,
    That of eidolons.
    • Eidolons (1876) ( Eidolon: An image or representation of an idea; an ideal form; an apparition of some aspect or entity of Reality )


  • All space, all time,
    (The stars, the terrible perturbations of the suns,
    Swelling, collapsing, ending, serving their longer, shorter use,)
    Fill'd with eidolons only.

    The noiseless myriads,
    The infinite oceans where the rivers empty,
    The separate countless free identities, like eyesight,
    The true realities, eidolons.
    Not this the world,
    Nor these the universes, they the universes,
    Purport and end, ever the permanent life of life,
    Eidolons, eidolons.
    • Eidolons (1876)


  • Thy very songs not in thy songs,
    No special strains to sing, none for itself,
    But from the whole resulting, rising at last and floating,
    A round full-orb'd eidolon.
    • Eidolons (1876)


With time and space I him dilate and fuse the immortal laws, to make himself by them the law unto himself.
  • For him I sing,
    I raise the present on the past
    ,
    (As some perennial tree out of its roots, the present on the past,)
    With time and space I him dilate and fuse the immortal laws,
    To make himself by them the law unto himself.
    • For Him I Sing (1871)


  • When I read the book, the biography famous,
    And is this then (said I) what the author calls a man's life?
    And so will some one when I am dead and gone write my life?
    (As if any man really knew aught of my life,
    Why even I myself I often think know little or nothing of my real life,
    Only a few hints, a few diffused faint clews and indirections
    I seek for my own use to trace out here.
    )
    • When I Read the Book (1867; 1871)


  • Beginning my studies the first step pleas'd me so much,
    The mere fact consciousness, these forms, the power of motion,
    The least insect or animal, the senses, eyesight, love,
    The first step I say awed me and pleas'd me so much,
    I have hardly gone and hardly wish'd to go any farther,
    But stop and loiter all the time to sing it in ecstatic songs.
    • Beginning My Studies (1860)


How they are provided for upon the earth, (appearing at intervals,) How dear and dreadful they are to the earth...
  • How they are provided for upon the earth, (appearing at intervals,)
    How dear and dreadful they are to the earth,
    How they inure to themselves as much as to any — what a paradox appears their age,
    How people respond to them, yet know them not,
    How there is something relentless in their fate all times,
    How all times mischoose the objects of their adulation and reward,
    And how the same inexorable price must still be paid for the same great purchase.
    • Beginners (1860)


  • Shut not your doors to me proud libraries,
    For that which was lacking on all your well-fill'd shelves, yet needed most, I bring
    ,
    Forth from the war emerging, a book I have made,
    The words of my book nothing, the drift of it every thing,
    A book separate, not link'd with the rest nor felt by the intellect,
    But you ye untold latencies will thrill to every page.
    • Shut Not Your Doors (1865; 1881)


I am a man who, sauntering along without fully stopping, turns a casual look upon you and then averts his face, leaving it to you to prove and define it, expecting the main things from you.
  • Poets to come! orators, singers, musicians to come!
    Not to-day is to justify me and answer what I am for,
    But you, a new brood, native, athletic, continental, greater than
    before known,
    Arouse! for you must justify me.

    I myself but write one or two indicative words for the future,
    I but advance a moment only to wheel and hurry back in the darkness.
    I am a man who, sauntering along without fully stopping, turns a casual look upon you and then averts his face,
    Leaving it to you to prove and define it,
    Expecting the main things from you.
    • Poets to Come (1860; 1867)


  • STRANGER! if you, passing, meet me, and desire to speak to me, why should you not speak to me?
    And why should I not speak to you?
    • To You (1860)


Starting from PaumanokEdit

  • I will write the evangel-poem of comrades and of love. (6)
  • I say the real and permanent grandeur of these States must be their religion. (7)
  • Nothing can happen more beautiful than death. (12)

Song of Myself (1855; 1881)Edit

Section numbers appear at the end of quotes from this composition
You shall not look through my eyes either, nor take things from me, You shall listen to all sides and filter them from your self...


  • I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
    And what I assume you shall assume,
    For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
    I loafe and invite my soul,
    I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass. (1)


  • You shall no longer take things at second or third hand, nor look through the eyes of the dead, nor feed on the spectres in books,
    You shall not look through my eyes either, nor take things from me,
    You shall listen to all sides and filter them from your self.
    (2)


I and this mystery here we stand...
  • To elaborate is no avail, learn'd and unlearn'd feel that it is so.

    I and this mystery here we stand. (3)


  • Clear and sweet is my soul, and clear and sweet is all that is not my soul.
    Lack one lacks both, and the unseen is proved by the seen,
    Till that becomes unseen and receives proof in its turn. (3)


I have no mockings or arguments, I witness and wait.
  • Knowing the perfect fitness and equanimity of things, while they discuss I am silent, and go bathe and admire myself.
    Welcome is every organ and attribute of me, and of any man hearty and clean,
    Not an inch nor a particle of an inch is vile, and none shall be less familiar than the rest.
    (3)


  • Both in and out of the game and watching and wondering at it.
    Backward I see in my own days where I sweated through fog with linguists and contenders,
    I have no mockings or arguments, I witness and wait. (4)


A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;
How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he...
  • Swiftly arose and spread around me the peace and knowledge that pass all the argument of the earth,
    And I know that the hand of God is the promise of my own,
    And I know that the spirit of God is the brother of my own,
    And that all the men ever born are also my brothers, and the women my sisters and lovers,
    And that a kelson of the creation is love,

    And limitless are leaves stiff or drooping in the fields,
    And brown ants in the little wells beneath them,
    And mossy scabs of the worm fence, heap'd stones, elder, mullein and poke-weed. (5)


I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven...
  • A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;
    How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.
    I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.


    And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.

    What do you think has become of the young and old men?
    And what do you think has become of the women and children?
    They are alive and well somewhere,
    The smallest sprout shows there is really no death,
    And if ever there was it led forward life, and does not wait at the end to arrest it,
    And ceas'd the moment life appear'd.
    All goes onward and outward, nothing collapses,
    And to die is different from what any one supposed, and luckier.
    (6)


  • Has any one supposed it lucky to be born?
    I hasten to inform him or her it is just as lucky to die, and I know it.
    I pass death with the dying and birth with the new-wash'd babe, and am not contain'd between my hat and boots,
    And peruse manifold objects, no two alike and every one good,
    The earth good and the stars good, and their adjuncts all good.
    I am not an earth nor an adjunct of an earth,
    I am the mate and companion of people, all just as immortal and fathomless as myself,
    (They do not know how immortal, but I know.)
    (7)


Do not call the tortoise unworthy because she is not something else.
  • Do not call the tortoise unworthy because she is not something else. (13)


What is commonest, cheapest, nearest, easiest, is Me...
  • The brood of the turkey-hen and she with her half-spread wings,
    I see in them and myself the same old law.
    The press of my foot to the earth springs a hundred affections,
    They scorn the best I can do to relate them.
    (14)


  • What is commonest, cheapest, nearest, easiest, is Me,
    Me going in for my chances, spending for vast returns,
    Adorning myself to bestow myself on the first that will take me,
    Not asking the sky to come down to my good will,
    Scattering it freely forever. (14)


These are really the thoughts of all men in all ages and lands, they are not original with me...
  • The city sleeps and the country sleeps,
    The living sleep for their time, the dead sleep for their time,
    The old husband sleeps by his wife and the young husband sleeps by his wife;
    And these tend inward to me, and I tend outward to them,
    And such as it is to be of these more or less I am,
    And of these one and all I weave the song of myself. (15)


  • Comrade of raftsmen and coalmen, comrade of all who shake hands and welcome to drink and meat,
    A learner with the simplest, a teacher of the thoughtfullest,
    A novice beginning yet experient of myriads of seasons,
    Of every hue and caste am I, of every rank and religion. (16)


  • The moth and the fish-eggs are in their place,
    The bright suns I see and the dark suns I cannot see are in their place,
    The palpable is in its place and the impalpable is in its place. (16)


This is the grass that grows wherever the land is and the water is, This the common air that bathes the globe.
  • These are really the thoughts of all men in all ages and lands, they are not original with me,
    If they are not yours as much as mine they are nothing, or next to nothing,
    If they are not the riddle and the untying of the riddle they are nothing,
    If they are not just as close as they are distant they are nothing.
    This is the grass that grows wherever the land is and the water is,
    This the common air that bathes the globe.
    (17)


  • With music strong I come, with my cornets and my drums,
    I play not marches for accepted victors only, I play marches for conquer'd and slain persons.

    Vivas to those who have fail'd!
    And to those whose war-vessels sank in the sea!
    And to those themselves who sank in the sea!
    And to all generals that lost engagements, and all overcome heroes!
    And the numberless unknown heroes equal to the greatest heroes known! (18)


  • This is the meal equally set, this the meat for natural hunger,
    It is for the wicked just same as the righteous, I make appointments with all,
    I will not have a single person slighted or left away. (19)


Do you guess I have some intricate purpose? Well I have, for the Fourth-month showers have, and the mica on the side of a rock has...
  • Do you guess I have some intricate purpose?
    Well I have, for the Fourth-month showers have, and the mica on the side of a rock has.
    Do you take it I would astonish?
    Does the daylight astonish?
    does the early redstart twittering through the woods?
    Do I astonish more than they?
    This hour I tell things in confidence,
    I might not tell everybody, but I will tell you. (19)


  • All I mark as my own you shall offset it with your own,
    Else it were time lost listening to me.
    I do not snivel that snivel the world over,
    That months are vacuums and the ground but wallow and filth.

    Whimpering and truckling fold with powders for invalids, conformity goes to the fourth-remov'd,
    I wear my hat as I please indoors or out. (20)


  • In all people I see myself, none more and not one a barley-corn less,
    And the good or bad I say of myself I say of them.
    (20)


I know I am august, I do not trouble my spirit to vindicate itself or be understood, I see that the elementary laws never apologize...
  • To me the converging objects of the universe perpetually flow,
    All are written to me, and I must get what the writing means.
    (20)


  • I know I am deathless,
    I know this orbit of mine cannot be swept by a carpenter's compass (20)


  • I know I am august,
    I do not trouble my spirit to vindicate itself or be understood,
    I see that the elementary laws never apologize,
    (I reckon I behave no prouder than the level I plant my house by, after all.) (20)


I exist as I am, that is enough, If no other in the world be aware I sit content, And if each and all be aware I sit content.
  • I exist as I am, that is enough,
    If no other in the world be aware I sit content,
    And if each and all be aware I sit content.

    One world is aware and by far the largest to me, and that is myself,
    And whether I come to my own to-day or in ten thousand or ten million years,
    I can cheerfully take it now, or with equal cheerfulness I can wait. (20)


  • My foothold is tenon'd and mortis'd in granite,
    I laugh at what you call dissolution,
    And I know the amplitude of time.
    (20)


  • I am the poet of the Body and I am the poet of the Soul,
    The pleasures of heaven are with me and the pains of hell are with me,
    The first I graft and increase upon myself, the latter I translate into new tongue. (21)


I am the poet of the woman the same as the man
  • I am the poet of the woman the same as the man,
    And I say it is as great to be a woman as to be a man
    ,
    And I say there is nothing greater than the mother of men. (21)


  • Have you outstript the rest? are you the President?
    It is a trifle, they will more than arrive there every one, and still pass on. (21)


  • My gait is no fault-finder's or rejecter's gait,
    I moisten the roots of all that has grown.
    (22)


A word of the faith that never balks, Here or henceforward it is all the same to me, I accept Time absolutely...
  • Did you guess the celestial laws are yet to be work'd over and rectified? (22)


  • What behaved well in the past or behaves well to-day is not such wonder,
    The wonder is always and always how there can be a mean man or an infidel. (22)


  • A word of the faith that never balks,
    Here or henceforward it is all the same to me, I accept Time absolutely.
    It alone is without flaw, it alone rounds and completes all,
    That mystic baffling wonder alone completes all.
    (23)


Whoever degrades another degrades me, And whatever is done or said returns at last to me.
  • Gentlemen, to you the first honors always!
    Your facts are useful, and yet they are not my dwelling,
    I but enter by them to an area of my dwelling. (23)


  • Walt Whitman, a kosmos, of Manhattan the son,
    Turbulent, fleshy, sensual, eating, drinking and breeding,
    No sentimentalist, no stander above men and women or apart from them,
    No more modest than immodest.
    Unscrew the locks from the doors!
    Unscrew the doors themselves from their jambs!
    Whoever degrades another degrades me,
    And whatever is done or said returns at last to me.
    (24)


  • Through me many long dumb voices,
    Voices of the interminable generations of prisoners and slaves,
    Voices of the diseas'd and despairing and of thieves and dwarfs,
    Voices of cycles of preparation and accretion,
    And of the threads that connect the stars, and of wombs and of the father-stuff,
    And of the rights of them the others are down upon
    ,
    Of the deform'd, trivial, flat, foolish, despised,
    Fog in the air, beetles rolling balls of dung.
    Through me forbidden voices,
    Voices of sexes and lusts, voices veil'd and I remove the veil,
    Voices indecent by me clarified and transfigur'd.
    (24)


  • I believe in the flesh and the appetites,
    Seeing, hearing, feeling, are miracles, and each part and tag of me is a miracle.
    Divine am I inside and out, and I make holy whatever I touch or am touch'd from
    ,
    The scent of these arm-pits aroma finer than prayer,
    This head more than churches, bibles, and all the creeds. (24)


A morning-glory at my window satisfies me more than the metaphysics of books.
  • I dote on myself, there is that lot of me and all so luscious,
    Each moment and whatever happens thrills me with joy,
    I cannot tell how my ankles bend, nor whence the cause of my faintest wish,
    Nor the cause of the friendship I emit, nor the cause of the friendship I take again. (24)


  • A morning-glory at my window satisfies me more than the metaphysics of books. (24)


  • Dazzling and tremendous how quick the sun-rise would kill me,
    If I could not now and always send sun-rise out of me. (25)


  • My voice goes after what my eyes cannot reach,
    With the twirl of my tongue I encompass worlds and volumes of worlds. (25)


My final merit I refuse you, I refuse putting from me what I really am,
Encompass worlds, but never try to encompass me...
  • Speech is the twin of my vision, it is unequal to measure itself,
    It provokes me forever, it says sarcastically,
    Walt you contain enough, why don't you let it out then? (25)


  • My final merit I refuse you, I refuse putting from me what I really am,
    Encompass worlds, but never try to encompass me
    ,
    I crowd your sleekest and best by simply looking toward you.
    Writing and talk do not prove me,
    I carry the plenum of proof and every thing else in my face,
    With the hush of my lips I wholly confound the skeptic. (25)


  • Now I will do nothing but listen,
    To accrue what I hear into this song, to let sounds contribute toward it. (26)


  • Mine is no callous shell,
    I have instant conductors all over me whether I pass or stop,
    They seize every object and lead it harmlessly through me.
    I merely stir, press, feel with my fingers, and am happy,
    To touch my person to some one else's is about as much as I can stand. (27)


  • Is this then a touch? quivering me to a new identity,
    Flames and ether making a rush for my veins (28)


All truths wait in all things, They neither hasten their own delivery nor resist it...
  • All truths wait in all things,
    They neither hasten their own delivery nor resist it
    ,
    They do not need the obstetric forceps of the surgeon,
    The insignificant is as big to me as any,
    (What is less or more than a touch?) (30)


  • Logic and sermons never convince,
    The damp of the night drives deeper into my soul.
    (Only what proves itself to every man and woman is so,
    Only what nobody denies is so.)
    A minute and a drop of me settle my brain,
    I believe the soggy clods shall become lovers and lamps,
    And a compend of compends is the meat of a man or woman,
    And a summit and flower there is the feeling they have for each other,
    And they are to branch boundlessly out of that lesson until it becomes omnific,
    And until one and all shall delight us, and we them.
    (30)


I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey work of the stars...
  • I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey work of the stars,
    And the pismire is equally perfect, and a grain of sand, and the egg
    of the wren,
    And the tree-toad is a chef-d'oeuvre for the highest,
    And the running blackberry would adorn the parlors of heaven,
    And the narrowest hinge in my hand puts to scorn all machinery,
    And the cow crunching with depress'd head surpasses any statue,
    And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels.
    (31)


... And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels.
  • I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self-contain'd,
    I stand and look at them long and long.
    They do not sweat and whine about their condition,
    They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins,
    They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God,
    Not one is dissatisfied, not one is demented with the mania of owning things,
    Not one kneels to another, nor to his kind that lived thousands of years ago,
    Not one is respectable or unhappy over the whole earth.
    So they show their relations to me and I accept them,
    They bring me tokens of myself, they evince them plainly in their possession. (32)


I but use you a minute, then I resign you, stallion,
Why do I need your paces when I myself out-gallop them?
  • I but use you a minute, then I resign you, stallion,
    Why do I need your paces when I myself out-gallop them?

    Even as I stand or sit passing faster than you. (32)


  • Space and Time! now I see it is true, what I guess'd at,
    What I guess'd when I loaf'd on the grass,
    What I guess'd while I lay alone in my bed,
    And again as I walk'd the beach under the paling stars of the morning.
    My ties and ballasts leave me, my elbows rest in sea-gaps,
    I skirt sierras, my palms cover continents,
    I am afoot with my vision. (33)


  • I visit the orchards of spheres and look at the product,
    And look at quintillions ripen'd and look at quintillions green.
    I fly those flights of a fluid and swallowing soul,
    My course runs below the soundings of plummets.
    I help myself to material and immaterial,
    No guard can shut me off, no law prevent me.
    I anchor my ship for a little while only,
    My messengers continually cruise away or bring their returns to me.
    (33)


I understand the large hearts of heroes,
The courage of present times and all times...
  • I understand the large hearts of heroes,
    The courage of present times and all times
    ,
    How the skipper saw the crowded and rudderless wreck of the steamship, and Death chasing it up and down the storm,
    How he knuckled tight and gave not back an inch, and was faithful of days and faithful of nights,
    And chalk'd in large letters on a board, Be of good cheer, we will not desert you;
    How he follow'd with them and tack'd with them three days and would not give it up,
    How he saved the drifting company at last,
    How the lank loose-gown'd women look'd when boated from the side of their prepared graves,
    How the silent old-faced infants and the lifted sick, and the sharp-lipp'd unshaved men;
    All this I swallow, it tastes good, I like it well, it becomes mine,
    I am the man, I suffer'd, I was there.
    (33)


Agonies are one of my changes of garments,
I do not ask the wounded person how he feels, I myself become the wounded person...
  • The disdain and calmness of martyrs,
    The mother of old, condemn'd for a witch, burnt with dry wood, her children gazing on,
    The hounded slave that flags in the race, leans by the fence, blowing, cover'd with sweat,
    The twinges that sting like needles his legs and neck, the murderous buckshot and the bullets,
    All these I feel or am.
    I am the hounded slave, I wince at the bite of the dogs,
    Hell and despair are upon me
    , crack and again crack the marksmen,
    I clutch the rails of the fence, my gore dribs, thinn'd with the ooze of my skin,
    I fall on the weeds and stones,
    The riders spur their unwilling horses, haul close,
    Taunt my dizzy ears and beat me violently over the head with whip-stocks.
    Agonies are one of my changes of garments,
    I do not ask the wounded person how he feels, I myself become the wounded person
    ,
    My hurts turn livid upon me as I lean on a cane and observe. (33)


  • I am the mash'd fireman with breast-bone broken,
    Tumbling walls buried me in their debris,
    Heat and smoke I inspired, I heard the yelling shouts of my comrades,
    I heard the distant click of their picks and shovels,
    They have clear'd the beams away, they tenderly lift me forth. (33)


I take part, I see and hear the whole...
  • I take part, I see and hear the whole (33)


  • Now I laugh content, for I hear the voice of my little captain,
    We have not struck, he composedly cries, we have just begun our part of the fighting. (33)


  • You laggards there on guard! look to your arms!
    In at the conquer'd doors they crowd! I am possess'd!
    Embody all presences outlaw'd or suffering,
    See myself in prison shaped like another man,
    And feel the dull unintermitted pain. (37)


I discover myself on the verge of a usual mistake.
That I could forget the mockers and insults! That I could forget the trickling tears and the blows of the bludgeons and hammers!
  • Askers embody themselves in me and I am embodied in them,
    I project my hat, sit shame-faced, and beg.


  • I discover myself on the verge of a usual mistake.
    That I could forget the mockers and insults!
    That I could forget the trickling tears and the blows of the bludgeons and hammers!
    That I could look with a separate look on my own crucifixion and bloody crowning.
    (38)


  • I troop forth replenish'd with supreme power, one of an average unending procession,
    Inland and sea-coast we go, and pass all boundary lines,
    Our swift ordinances on their way over the whole earth,
    The blossoms we wear in our hats the growth of thousands of years.
    (38)


  • Man or woman, I might tell how I like you, but cannot,
    And might tell what it is in me and what it is in you, but cannot,
    And might tell that pining I have, that pulse of my nights and days.
    Behold, I do not give lectures or a little charity,
    When I give I give myself.
    (40)


I have stores plenty and to spare, And any thing I have I bestow. I do not ask who you are, that is not important to me, You can do nothing and be nothing but what I will infold you.
  • I am not to be denied, I compel, I have stores plenty and to spare,
    And any thing I have I bestow.
    I do not ask who you are, that is not important to me,
    You can do nothing and be nothing but what I will infold you.

    To cotton-field drudge or cleaner of privies I lean,
    On his right cheek I put the family kiss,
    And in my soul I swear I never will deny him. (40)


  • On women fit for conception I start bigger and nimbler babes.
    (This day I am jetting the stuff of far more arrogant republics.) (40)


Magnifying and applying come I, outbidding at the start the old cautious hucksters...
  • Magnifying and applying come I,
    Outbidding at the start the old cautious hucksters
    ,
    Taking myself the exact dimensions of Jehovah,
    Lithographing Kronos, Zeus his son, and Hercules his grandson,
    Buying drafts of Osiris, Isis, Belus, Brahma, Buddha,
    In my portfolio placing Manito loose, Allah on a leaf, the crucifix engraved,
    With Odin and the hideous-faced Mexitli and every idol and image,
    Taking them all for what they are worth and not a cent more,
    Admitting they were alive and did the work of their days,
    (They bore mites as for unfledg'd birds who have now to rise and fly and sing for themselves,)
    Accepting the rough deific sketches to fill out better in myself, bestowing them freely on each man and woman I see,
    Discovering as much or more in a framer framing a house,
    Putting higher claims for him there with his roll'd-up sleeves driving the mallet and chisel,
    Not objecting to special revelations, considering a curl of smoke or a hair on the back of my hand just as curious as any revelation,
    Lads ahold of fire-engines and hook-and-ladder ropes no less to me than the gods of the antique wars...
    (41)
    • The version in the original 1855 edition had slightly bolder, though less refined, start to this passage and read:
      Magnifying and applying come I,
      Outbidding at the start the old cautious hucksters,
      The most they offer for mankind and eternity less than a spirt of my own seminal wet,
      Taking myself the exact dimensions of Jehovah and laying them away,
      Lithographing Kronos and Zeus his son, and Hercules his grandson,
      Buying drafts of Osiris and Isis and Belus and Brahma and Adonai


The bull and the bug never worshipp'd half enough,
Dung and dirt more admirable than was dream'd...
  • The bull and the bug never worshipp'd half enough,
    Dung and dirt more admirable than was dream'd
    ,
    The supernatural of no account, myself waiting my time to be one of the supremes,
    The day getting ready for me when I shall do as much good as the best, and be as prodigious. (42)


My faith is the greatest of faiths and the least of faiths,
Enclosing worship ancient and modern and all between ancient and modern…
  • The little plentiful manikins skipping around in collars and tail'd coats
    I am aware who they are, (they are positively not worms or fleas,)
    I acknowledge the duplicates of myself, the weakest and shallowest is deathless with me,
    What I do and say the same waits for them,
    Every thought that flounders in me the same flounders in them. (42)


  • I do not despise you priests, all time, the world over,
    My faith is the greatest of faiths and the least of faiths,
    Enclosing worship ancient and modern and all between ancient and modern…
    (43)


  • Waiting responses from oracles, honoring the gods, saluting the sun,
    Making a fetich of the first rock or stump, powowing with sticks in the circle of obis,
    Helping the llama or brahmin as he trims the lamps of the idols,
    Dancing yet through the streets in a phallic procession, rapt and austere in the woods a gymnosophist,
    Drinking mead from the skull-cap, to Shastas and Vedas admirant, minding the Koran,
    Walking the teokallis, spotted with gore from the stone and knife, beating the serpent-skin drum,
    Accepting the Gospels, accepting him that was crucified, knowing assuredly that he is divine… (43)


I do not know what is untried and afterward,
But I know it will in its turn prove sufficient, and cannot fail.
  • Down-hearted doubters dull and excluded,
    Frivolous, sullen, moping, angry, affected, dishearten'd, atheistical,
    I know every one of you, I know the sea of torment, doubt, despair and unbelief.

    Be at peace bloody flukes of doubters and sullen mopers,
    I take my place among you as much as among any,
    The past is the push of you, me, all, precisely the same,
    And what is yet untried and afterward is for you, me, all, precisely the same.
    I do not know what is untried and afterward,
    But I know it will in its turn prove sufficient, and cannot fail.
    (43)


  • Each who passes is consider'd, each who stops is consider'd, not single one can it fail.
    It cannot fail the young man who died and was buried,
    Nor the young woman who died and was put by his side,
    Nor the little child that peep'd in at the door, and then drew back and was never seen again,
    Nor the old man who has lived without purpose, and feels it with bitterness worse than gall…(43)


What is known I strip away, I launch all men and women forward with me into the Unknown. The clock indicates the moment — but what does eternity indicate?
  • It is time to explain myself — let us stand up.
    What is known I strip away,
    I launch all men and women forward with me into the Unknown.
    The clock indicates the moment — but what does eternity indicate?

    We have thus far exhausted trillions of winters and summers, There are trillions ahead, and trillions ahead of them.
    Births have brought us richness and variety,
    And other births will bring us richness and variety.
    I do not call one greater and one smaller,
    That which fills its period and place is equal to any.
    Were mankind murderous or jealous upon you, my brother, my sister?
    I am sorry for you, they are not murderous or jealous upon me,
    All has been gentle with me, I keep no account with lamentation,
    (What have I to do with lamentation?)
    I am an acme of things accomplish'd, and I an encloser of things to be. (44)


Immense have been the preparations for me, faithful and friendly the arms that have help'd me.
  • Rise after rise bow the phantoms behind me,
    Afar down I see the huge first Nothing, I know I was even there,
    I waited unseen and always, and slept through the lethargic mist,
    And took my time, and took no hurt from the fetid carbon. (44)


  • Immense have been the preparations for me,
    Faithful and friendly the arms that have help'd me.
    (44)


  • For room to me stars kept aside in their own rings,
    They sent influences to look after what was to hold me.
    Before I was born out of my mother generations guided me,
    My embryo has never been torpid, nothing could overlay it.
    For it the nebula cohered to an orb,
    The long slow strata piled to rest it on,
    Vast vegetables gave it sustenance,
    Monstrous sauroids transported it in their mouths and deposited it with care.
    All forces have been steadily employ'd to complete and delight me,
    Now on this spot I stand with my robust soul.
    (44)


  • There is no stoppage and never can be stoppage,
    If I, you, and the worlds, and all beneath or upon their surfaces, were this moment reduced back to a pallid float, it would not avail the long run,
    We should surely bring up again where we now stand,
    And surely go as much farther, and then farther and farther.


  • A few quadrillions of eras, a few octillions of cubic leagues, do not hazard the span or make it impatient,
    They are but parts, any thing is but a part.
    See ever so far, there is limitless space outside of that,
    Count ever so much, there is limitless time around that.
    (45)


Not I, not any one else can travel that road for you,
You must travel it for yourself.
  • I know I have the best of time and space, and was never measured and never will be measured. (46)


  • I have no chair, no church, no philosophy,
    I lead no man to a dinner-table, library, exchange,
    But each man and each woman of you I lead upon a knoll,
    My left hand hooking you round the waist,
    My right hand pointing to landscapes of continents and the public road.
    Not I, not any one else can travel that road for you,
    You must travel it for yourself.

    It is not far, it is within reach,
    Perhaps you have been on it since you were born and did not know,
    Perhaps it is everywhere on water and on land. (46)


Wonderful cities and free nations we shall fetch as we go.
  • Wonderful cities and free nations we shall fetch as we go.


  • This day before dawn I ascended a hill and look'd at the crowded heaven,
    And I said to my spirit When we become the enfolders of those orbs, and the pleasure and knowledge of every thing in them, shall we be fill'd and satisfied then?
    And my spirit said No, we but level that lift to pass and continue beyond.
    You are also asking me questions and I hear you,
    I answer that I cannot answer, you must find out for yourself. (46)


Long enough have you dream'd contemptible dreams... You must habit yourself to the dazzle of the light and of every moment of your life.
  • Long enough have you dream'd contemptible dreams,
    Now I wash the gum from your eyes,
    You must habit yourself to the dazzle of the light and of every moment of your life. (46)


  • Long have you timidly waded holding a plank by the shore,
    Now I will you to be a bold swimmer…


  • I am the teacher of athletes,
    He that by me spreads a wider breast than my own proves the width of my own,
    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. (47)


  • I teach straying from me, yet who can stray from me?
    I follow you whoever you are from the present hour,
    My words itch at your ears till you understand them.


If you would understand me go to the heights or water-shore, the nearest gnat is an explanation, and a drop or motion of waves a key...
  • It is you talking just as much as myself, I act as the tongue of you,
    Tied in your mouth, in mine it begins to be loosen'd. (47)


  • I swear I will never again mention love or death inside a house,
    And I swear I will never translate myself at all, only to him or her who privately stays with me in the open air.
    If you would understand me go to the heights or water-shore,
    The nearest gnat is an explanation, and a drop or motion of waves a key
    ,
    The maul, the oar, the hand-saw, second my words.
    No shutter'd room or school can commune with me,
    But roughs and little children better than they. (47)


There is no object so soft but it makes a hub for the wheel'd universe...
  • I have said that the soul is not more than the body,
    And I have said that the body is not more than the soul,
    And nothing, not God, is greater to one than one's self is,
    And whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud,
    And I or you pocketless of a dime may purchase the pick of the earth,
    And to glance with an eye or show a bean in its pod confounds the learning of all times,
    And there is no trade or employment but the young man following it may become a hero,
    And there is no object so soft but it makes a hub for the wheel'd universe,
    And I say to any man or woman, Let your soul stand cool and composed before a million universes.
    (48)


I hear and behold God in every object, yet understand God not in the least...
  • I say to mankind, Be not curious about God,
    For I who am curious about each am not curious about God,
    (No array of terms can say how much I am at peace about God and about death.) (48)


In the faces of men and women I see God, and in my own face in the glass...
  • I hear and behold God in every object, yet understand God not in the least,
    Nor do I understand who there can be more wonderful than myself.
    Why should I wish to see God better than this day?
    I see something of God each hour of the twenty-four, and each moment then,
    In the faces of men and women I see God, and in my own face in the glass,
    I find letters from God dropt in the street, and every one is sign'd by God's name,
    And I leave them where they are, for I know that wheresoe'er I go,
    Others will punctually come for ever and ever.
    (48)


  • And as to you Death, and you bitter hug of mortality, it is idle to try to alarm me. (49)


  • There is that in me — I do not know what it is — but I know it is in me.

    I do not know it — it is without name — it is a word unsaid,
    It is not in any dictionary, utterance, symbol.

    Something it swings on more than the earth I swing on,
    To it the creation is the friend whose embracing awakes me. (50)


I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.
  • Do I contradict myself?
    Very well then I contradict myself,
    (I am large, I contain multitudes.)
    (51)


  • I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable,
    I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.


  • I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love,
    If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles.
    You will hardly know who I am or what I mean,
    But I shall be good health to you nevertheless…


  • Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged,
    Missing me one place search another,
    I stop somewhere waiting for you.

CHILDREN OF ADAMEdit

From pent-up aching rivers,
From that of myself without which I were nothing,
From what I am determin'd to make illustrious, even if I stand sole among men...


  • To the garden the world anew ascending,
    Potent mates, daughters, sons, preluding,
    The love, the life of their bodies, meaning and being,
    Curious here behold my resurrection after slumber,
    The revolving cycles in their wide sweep having brought me again,
    Amorous, mature, all beautiful to me, all wondrous…
    • To the Garden the World (1860; 1867)


  • From pent-up aching rivers,
    From that of myself without which I were nothing,
    From what I am determin'd to make illustrious, even if I stand sole among men
    ,
    From my own voice resonant, singing the phallus,
    Singing the song of procreation…
    • From Pent-Up Aching Rivers (1860; 1881)


  • I willingly stake all for you,
    O let me be lost if it must be so!
    O you and I! what is it to us what the rest do or think?
    What is all else to us? only that we enjoy each other and exhaust each other if it must be so;)
    • From Pent-Up Aching Rivers (1860; 1881)


I Sing the Body Electric (1855; 1881)Edit

I sing the body electric,
The armies of those I love engirth me and I engirth them...


  • I sing the body electric,
    The armies of those I love engirth me and I engirth them,
    They will not let me off till I go with them, respond to them,
    And discorrupt them, and charge them full with the charge of the soul.
    (1)


  • The love of the body of man or woman balks account, the body itself balks account,
    That of the male is perfect, and that of the female is perfect. (2)


  • There is something in staying close to men and women and looking on them, and in the contact and odor of them, that pleases the soul well,
    All things please the soul, but these please the soul well. (4)


  • The female contains all qualities and tempers them,
    She is in her place and moves with perfect balance,
    She is all things duly veil'd, she is both passive and active,
    She is to conceive daughters as well as sons, and sons as well as daughters. (5)


  • The male is not less the soul nor more, he too is in his place,
    He too is all qualities, he is action and power,
    The flush of the known universe is in him…(6)


  • The man's body is sacred and the woman's body is sacred,
    No matter who it is, it is sacred…
    (6)


  • All is a procession,
    The universe is a procession with measured and perfect motion. (6)


e^{i \pi} + 1 = 0 \,\! *

Do you know so much yourself that you call the meanest ignorant?

  • Do you know so much yourself that you call the meanest ignorant?
    Do you suppose you have a right to a good sight, and he or she has no right to a sight?
    Do you think matter has cohered together from its diffuse float, and the soil is on the surface, and water runs and vegetation sprouts,
    For you only, and not for him and her?
    (6)


  • A man's body at auction,
    (For before the war I often go to the slave-mart and watch the sale,)
    I help the auctioneer, the sloven does not half know his business. (7)
    • 1855 version:
      A slave at auction!
      I help the auctioneer… the sloven does not half know his business.


  • Gentlemen look on this wonder,
    Whatever the bids of the bidders they cannot be high enough for it
    ,
    For it the globe lay preparing quintillions of years without one animal or plant,
    For it the revolving cycles truly and steadily roll'd.
    In this head the all-baffling brain,
    In it and below it the makings of heroes. (7)


This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,
In him the start of populous states and rich republics...
  • This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,
    In him the start of populous states and rich republics,
    Of him countless immortal lives with countless embodiments and enjoyments.
    How do you know who shall come from the offspring of his offspring through the centuries?
    (Who might you find you have come from yourself, if you could trace back through the centuries?) (7)


She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers...
  • A woman's body at auction,
    She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers
    ,
    She is the bearer of them that shall grow and be mates to the mothers. (8)


  • Have you ever loved the body of a woman?
    Have you ever loved the body of a man?
    Do you not see that these are exactly the same to all in all nations and times all over the earth? (8)


  • If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,
    And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,
    And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful than the most beautiful face. (8)


  • Have you seen the fool that corrupted his own live body? or the fool that corrupted her own live body?
    For they do not conceal themselves, and cannot conceal themselves. (8)


  • O my body! I dare not desert the likes of you in other men and women, nor the likes of the parts of you,
    I believe the likes of you are to stand or fall with the likes of the soul, (and that they are the soul,)
    I believe the likes of you shall stand or fall with my poems, and that they are my poems… (9)


  • O I say these are not the parts and poems of the body only, but of the soul,
    O I say now these are the soul!

A Woman Waits for MeEdit

Without shame the man I like knows and avows the deliciousness of his sex,
Without shame the woman I like knows and avows hers...


  • A woman waits for me, she contains all, nothing is lacking,
    Yet all were lacking if sex were lacking, or if the moisture of the right man were lacking.


  • Sex contains all, bodies, souls,
    Meanings, proofs, purities, delicacies, results, promulgations,
    Songs, commands, health, pride, the maternal mystery, the seminal milk,
    All hopes, benefactions, bestowals, all the passions, loves, beauties, delights of the earth,
    All the governments, judges, gods, follow'd persons of the earth,
    These are contain'd in sex as parts of itself and justifications of itself.


  • Without shame the man I like knows and avows the deliciousness of his sex,
    Without shame the woman I like knows and avows hers.


  • I draw you close to me, you women,
    I cannot let you go, I would do you good,
    I am for you, and you are for me, not only for our own sake, but for others' sakes,
    Envelop'd in you sleep greater heroes and bards,
    They refuse to awake at the touch of any man but me.


  • I dare not withdraw till I deposit what has so long accumulated within me.


  • I shall look for loving crops from the birth, life, death, immortality, I plant so lovingly now.




  • The consequent meanness of me should I skulk or find myself indecent,
    while birds and animals never once skulk or find themselves indecent,
    The great chastity of paternity, to match the great chastity of maternity,
    The oath of procreation I have sworn…
    • Spontaneous Me (1856; 1867).


One Hour to Madness and Joy (1860; 1861)Edit

What is this that frees me so in storms?
What do my shouts amid lightnings and raging winds mean?


  • What is this that frees me so in storms?
    What do my shouts amid lightnings and raging winds mean?


  • O to drink the mystic deliria deeper than any other man!
    O savage and tender achings!


To escape utterly from others' anchors and holds!
To drive free! to love free! to dash reckless and dangerous!
  • O to be yielded to you whoever you are, and you to be yielded to me in defiance of the world!


  • O to speed where there is space enough and air enough at last!
    To be absolv'd from previous ties and conventions, I from mine and you from yours!
    To find a new unthought-of nonchalance with the best of Nature!
    To have the gag remov'd from one's mouth!
    To have the feeling to-day or any day I am sufficient as I am.


  • To escape utterly from others' anchors and holds!
    To drive free! to love free! to dash reckless and dangerous!
    To court destruction with taunts, with invitations!
    To ascend, to leap to the heavens of the love indicated to me!


  • To feed the remainder of life with one hour of fulness and freedom!
    With one brief hour of madness and joy.




We two, how long we were fool'd, now transmuted, We swiftly escape as Nature escapes, We are Nature, long have we been absent, but now we return…
  • I love you, before long I die,
    I have travel'd a long way merely to look on you to touch you,
    For I could not die till I once look'd on you,
    For I fear'd I might afterward lose you.
    • Out of the Rolling Ocean the Crowd (1865;1881).


  • We two, how long we were fool'd,
    Now transmuted, we swiftly escape as Nature escapes,
    We are Nature, long have we been absent, but now we return…
    • We Two, How Long We Were Fool'd (1860;1881).


  • I will play a part no longer, why should I exile myself from my companions?
    O you shunn'd persons, I at least do not shun you,
    I come forthwith in your midst, I will be your poet,
    I will be more to you than to any of the rest.
    • Native Moments (1860;1881).


Where is what I started for so long ago?
And why is it yet unfound?
  • Once I pass'd through a populous city imprinting my brain for future use with its shows, architecture, customs, traditions,
    Yet now of all that city I remember only a woman I casually met there who detain'd me for love of me…
    • Once I Pass'd Through a Populous City (1860;1861).


  • Where is what I started for so long ago?
    And why is it yet unfound?
    • Facing West from California's Shores (1860;1867).


  • Behold me where I pass, hear my voice, approach,
    Touch me, touch the palm of your hand to my body as I pass,
    Be not afraid of my body.
    • As Adam Early in the Morning (1861;1867).


CALAMUSEdit

O I do not know whether many passing by will discover you or inhale your faint odor, but I believe a few will...


  • Escaped from the life that exhibits itself,
    From all the standards hitherto publish'd, from the pleasures, profits, conformities,
    Which too long I was offering to feed my soul,
    Clear to me now standards not yet publish'd
    , clear to me that my soul,
    That the soul of the man I speak for rejoices in comrades…
    • In Paths Untrodden (1860; 1867)


I give you fair warning before you attempt me further, I am not what you supposed, but far different.
  • O I do not know whether many passing by will discover you or inhale your faint odor, but I believe a few will...
    • Scented Herbage of My Breast (1860;1881).


  • Whoever you are holding me now in hand,
    Without one thing all will be useless,
    I give you fair warning before you attempt me further,
    I am not what you supposed, but far different.
    • Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Hand (1860;1881).


  • These leaves conning you con at peril,
    For these leaves and me you will not understand
    ,
    They will elude you at first and still more afterward, I will certainly elude you.
    Even while you should think you had unquestionably caught me, behold!
    Already you see I have escaped from you.
    • Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Hand (1860;1881)


I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing...
  • I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing,
    All alone stood it and the moss hung down from the branches,
    Without any companion it grew there uttering joyous of dark green,
    And its look, rude, unbending, lusty, made me think of myself,
    But I wonder'd how it could utter joyous leaves standing alone there without its friend near, for I knew I could not,
    • I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing (1860; 1867).


  • Though the live-oak glistens there in Louisiana solitary in a wide in a wide flat space,
    Uttering joyous leaves all its life without a friend a lover near,
    I know very well I could not.
    • I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing (1860; 1867).


  • Passing stranger! you do not know how longingly I look upon you,
    You must be he I was seeking, or she I was seeking, (it comes to me
    as of a dream,)
    I have somewhere surely lived a life of joy with you,
    • To a Stranger (1860; 1867)


  • I am to wait, I do not doubt I am to meet you again,
    I am to see to it that I do not lose you.
    • To a Stranger (1860; 1867).


I hear it was charged against me that I sought to destroy institutions, but really I am neither for nor against institutions, (What indeed have I in common with them? or what with the destruction of them?)
  • This moment yearning and thoughtful sitting alone,
    It seems to me there are other men in other lands yearning and thoughtful…
    • This Moment Yearning and Thoughtful (1860;1881).


  • I hear it was charged against me that I sought to destroy institutions,
    But really I am neither for nor against institutions,
    (What indeed have I in common with them? or what with the destruction of them?)

    Only I will establish in the Mannahatta and in every city of these States inland and seaboard,
    And in the fields and woods, and above every keel little or large that dents the water,
    Without edifices or rules or trustees or any argument,
    The institution of the dear love of comrades.
    • I Hear It Was Charged Against Me (1860;1867)


  • I dream'd in a dream I saw a city invincible to the attacks of the whole of the rest of the earth,
    I dream'd that was the new city of Friends,

    Nothing was greater there than the quality of robust love, it led the rest,
    It was seen every hour in the actions of the men of that city,
    And in all their looks and words.
    • I Dream'd in a Dream (1860;1867)


Song of the Open Road (1856;1881)Edit

Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself am good-fortune...
  • Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself am good-fortune,
    Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing,
    Done with indoor complaints, libraries, querulous criticisms,
    Strong and content I travel the open road. (1)


From this hour I ordain myself loos'd of limits and imaginary lines...
  • The earth, that is sufficient,
    I do not want the constellations any nearer,
    I know they are very well where they are,
    I know they suffice for those who belong to them. (1)


Be not discouraged, keep on, there are divine things well envelop'd,
I swear to you there are divine things more beautiful than words can tell....
  • From this hour I ordain myself loos'd of limits and imaginary lines,
    Going where I list, my own master total and absolute,
    Listening to others, considering well what they say,
    Pausing, searching, receiving, contemplating,
    Gently, but with undeniable will, divesting myself of the holds that would hold me.
    (5)


  • I am larger, better than I thought,
    I did not know I held so much goodness. (5)


  • All seems beautiful to me,
    I can repeat over to men and women
    You have done such good to me
    I would do the same to you,
    I will recruit for myself and you as I go,
    I will scatter myself among men and women as I go,
    I will toss a new gladness and roughness among them,
    Whoever denies me it shall not trouble me,
    Whoever accepts me he or she shall be blessed and shall bless me.
    (5)


  • Wisdom is not finally tested in schools,
    Wisdom cannot be pass'd from one having it to another not having it,
    Wisdom is of the soul, is not susceptible of proof, is its own proof,
    Applies to all stages and objects and qualities and is content,
    Is the certainty of the reality and immortality of things, and the excellence of things;
    Something there is in the float of the sight of things that provokes it out of the soul. (6)


All parts away for the progress of souls,
All religion, all solid things, arts, governments — all that was or is apparent upon this globe or any globe, falls into niches and corners before the procession of souls along the grand roads of the universe.
  • The earth is rude, silent, incomprehensible at first, Nature is rude and incomprehensible at first,
    Be not discouraged, keep on, there are divine things well envelop'd,
    I swear to you there are divine things more beautiful than words can tell.
    (9)


  • I and mine do not convince by arguments, similes, rhymes, We convince by our presence. (10)


  • Know the universe itself as a road, as many roads, as roads for traveling souls. (13)


  • All parts away for the progress of souls,
    All religion, all solid things, arts, governments — all that was or is apparent upon this globe or any globe, falls into niches and corners before the procession of souls along the grand roads of the universe.
    (13)


  • They go! they go! I know that they go, but I know not where they go,
    But I know that they go toward the best — toward something great.
    (13)


  • Whoever you are, come forth! or man or woman come forth! (13)


  • Camerado, I give you my hand!
    I give you my love more precious than money,
    I give you myself before preaching or law;
    Will you give me yourself? will you come travel with me?
    Shall we stick by each other as long as we live? (15)

Song of the Answerer (1855; 1856; 1881)Edit

He puts things in their attitudes, He puts to-day out of himself with plasticity and love...
It is vain to skulk — do you hear that mocking and laughter? do you hear the ironical echoes?
Every existence has its idiom, every thing has an idiom and tongue...
He has the pass-key of hearts, to him the response of the prying of hands on the knobs.
One part does not counteract another part, he is the joiner, he sees how they join.
Time, always without break, indicates itself in parts, What always indicates the poet is the crowd of the pleasant company of singers, and their words...
The words of the true poems give you more than poems, they give you to form for yourself poems, religions, politics, war, peace, behavior, histories, essays, daily life, and every thing else...
Whom they take they take into space to behold the birth of stars, to learn one of the meanings,
To launch off with absolute faith, to sweep through the ceaseless rings and never be quiet again.
  • Now list to my morning's romanza, I tell the signs of the Answerer,
    To the cities and farms I sing as they spread in the sunshine before me.


  • A young man comes to me bearing a message from his brother,
    How shall the young man know the whether and when of his brother?
    Tell him to send me the signs. And I stand before the young man face to face, and take his right hand in my left hand and his left hand in my right hand,
    And I answer for his brother and for men, and I answer for him that answers for all, and send these signs.


  • Him all wait for, him all yield up to, his word is decisive and final,
    Him they accept, in him lave, in him perceive themselves as amid light,
    Him they immerse and he immerses them.


  • Nothing for any one but what is for him, near and far are for him, the ships in the offing,
    The perpetual shows and marches on land are for him if they are for anybody.


  • He puts things in their attitudes,
    He puts to-day out of himself with plasticity and love,
    He places his own times, reminiscences, parents, brothers and sisters, associations, employment, politics, so that the rest never shame them afterward, nor assume to command them.


  • He is the Answerer,
    What can be answer'd he answers, and what cannot be answer'd he shows how it cannot be answer'd.

    A man is a summons and challenge,
    (It is vain to skulk — do you hear that mocking and laughter? do you hear the ironical echoes?)

    Books, friendships, philosophers, priests, action, pleasure, pride, beat up and down seeking to give satisfaction,
    He indicates the satisfaction, and indicates them that beat up and down also.

    Whichever the sex, whatever the season or place, he may go freshly and gently and safely by day or by night,
    He has the pass-key of hearts, to him the response of the prying of hands on the knobs.

    His welcome is universal, the flow of beauty is not more welcome or universal than he is,
    The person he favors by day or sleeps with at night is blessed.


  • Every existence has its idiom, every thing has an idiom and tongue,
    He resolves all tongues into his own and bestows it upon men, and any man translates, and any man translates himself also,
    One part does not counteract another part, he is the joiner, he sees how they join.


  • He says indifferently and alike How are you friend? to the President at his levee,
    And he says Good-day my brother, to Cudge that hoes in the sugar-field,
    And both understand him and know that his speech is right.


  • He walks with perfect ease in the capitol,
    He walks among the Congress, and one Representative says to another,
    Here is our equal appearing and new.


  • Then the mechanics take him for a mechanic,
    And the soldiers suppose him to be a soldier, and the sailors that he has follow'd the sea,
    And the authors take him for an author, and the artists for an artist,
    And the laborers perceive he could labor with them and love them,
    No matter what the work is, that he is the one to follow it or has follow'd it,
    No matter what the nation, that he might find his brothers and sisters there.


  • The English believe he comes of their English stock,
    A Jew to the Jew he seems, a Russ to the Russ, usual and near, removed from none.


  • The gentleman of perfect blood acknowledges his perfect blood,
    The insulter, the prostitute, the angry person, the beggar, see themselves in the ways of him, he strangely transmutes them,
    They are not vile any more, they hardly know themselves they are so grown.


  • The indications and tally of time,
    Perfect sanity shows the master among philosophs,
    Time, always without break, indicates itself in parts,
    What always indicates the poet is the crowd of the pleasant company of singers, and their words
    ,
    The words of the singers are the hours or minutes of the light or dark, but the words of the maker of poems are the general light and dark,
    The maker of poems settles justice, reality, immortality,
    His insight and power encircle things and the human race,
    He is the glory and extract thus far of things and of the human race.


  • The singers do not beget, only the Poet begets,
    The singers are welcom'd, understood, appear often enough, but rare has the day been, likewise the spot, of the birth of the maker of poems, the Answerer,
    (Not every century nor every five centuries has contain'd such a day, for all its names.)


  • All this time and at all times wait the words of true poems,
    The words of true poems do not merely please,
    The true poets are not followers of beauty but the august masters of beauty…


  • The words of the true poems give you more than poems,
    They give you to form for yourself poems, religions, politics, war, peace, behavior, histories, essays, daily life, and every thing else,
    They balance ranks, colors, races, creeds, and the sexes,
    They do not seek beauty, they are sought
    ,
    Forever touching them or close upon them follows beauty, longing, fain, love-sick.


  • They prepare for death, yet are they not the finish, but rather the outset,
    They bring none to his or her terminus or to be content and full,
    Whom they take they take into space to behold the birth of stars, to learn one of the meanings,
    To launch off with absolute faith, to sweep through the ceaseless rings and never be quiet again.

Song of the Rolling Earth (1856; 1881)Edit

The true words do not fail, for motion does not fail and reflection does not fail,
Also the day and night do not fail, and the voyage we pursue does not fail.
Whoever you are! you are he or she for whom the earth is solid and liquid,
You are he or she for whom the sun and moon hang in the sky...
I swear I see what is better than to tell the best, It is always to leave the best untold.
The best of the earth cannot be told anyhow, all or any is best,
It is not what you anticipated, it is cheaper, easier, nearer...
Work on, age after age, nothing is to be lost,
It may have to wait long, but it will certainly come in use,
When the materials are all prepared and ready, the architects shall appear.
  • A song of the rolling earth, and of words according,
    Were you thinking that those were the words, those upright lines? those curves, angles, dots?
    No, those are not the words, the substantial words are in the ground and sea,
    They are in the air, they are in you.


  • Though it were told in the three thousand languages, what would air, soil, water, fire, know of my name?


  • The earth neither lags nor hastens,
    It has all attributes, growths, effects, latent in itself from the jump,
    It is not half beautiful only, defects and excrescences show just as much as perfections show.


  • The true words do not fail, for motion does not fail and reflection does not fail,
    Also the day and night do not fail, and the voyage we pursue does not fail.


  • Whoever you are! you are he or she for whom the earth is solid and liquid,
    You are he or she for whom the sun and moon hang in the sky,
    For none more than you are the present and the past,
    For none more than you is immortality.


  • Each man to himself and each woman to herself, is the word of the past and present, and the true word of immortality;
    No one can acquire for another — not one,
    Not one can grow for another — not one.


  • The song is to the singer, and comes back most to him,
    The teaching is to the teacher, and comes back most to him.


  • No man understands any greatness or goodness but his own, or the indication of his own.


  • I swear the earth shall surely be complete to him or her who shall be complete,
    The earth remains jagged and broken only to him or her who remains jagged and broken.


  • I swear I begin to see little or nothing in audible words,
    All merges toward the presentation of the unspoken meanings of the earth,
    Toward him who sings the songs of the body and of the truths of the earth,
    Toward him who makes the dictionaries of words that print cannot touch.


  • I swear I see what is better than to tell the best,
    It is always to leave the best untold.


  • The best of the earth cannot be told anyhow, all or any is best,
    It is not what you anticipated, it is cheaper, easier, nearer
    ,
    Things are not dismiss'd from the places they held before,
    The earth is just as positive and direct as it was before,
    Facts, religions, improvements, politics, trades, are as real as before,
    But the soul is also real, it too is positive and direct,
    No reasoning, no proof has establish'd it,
    Undeniable growth has establish'd it.


  • I swear I will never henceforth have to do with the faith that tells the best,
    I will have to do only with that faith that leaves the best untold.


  • Say on, sayers! sing on, singers!
    Delve! mould! pile the words of the earth!
    Work on, age after age, nothing is to be lost,
    It may have to wait long, but it will certainly come in use,
    When the materials are all prepared and ready, the architects shall appear.


  • I swear to you the architects shall appear without fall,
    I swear to you they will understand you and justify you,
    The greatest among them shall be he who best knows you, and encloses all and is faithful to all,
    He and the rest shall not forget you, they shall perceive that you are not an iota less than they,
    You shall be fully glorified in them.

BIRDS OF PASSAGEEdit

To You (1856; 1881)Edit

Whoever you are, I fear you are walking the walks of dreams, I fear these supposed realities are to melt from under your feet and hands
Through birth, life, death, burial, the means are provided, nothing is scanted,
Through angers, losses, ambition, ignorance, ennui, what you are picks its way.
  • Whoever you are, I fear you are walking the walks of dreams,
    I fear these supposed realities are to melt from under your feet and hands…


  • Whoever you are, now I place my hand upon you, that you be my poem,
    I whisper with my lips close to your ear.
    I have loved many women and men, but I love none better than you.


  • I will leave all and come and make the hymns of you,
    None has understood you, but I understand you,
    None has done justice to you, you have not done justice to yourself,
    None but has found you imperfect, I only find no imperfection in you,
    None but would subordinate you, I only am he who will never consent to subordinate you,
    I only am he who places over you no master, owner, better, God, beyond what waits intrinsically in yourself.


  • O I could sing such grandeurs and glories about you!
    You have not known what you are, you have slumber'd upon yourself all your life
    ,
    Your eyelids have been the same as closed most of the time,
    What you have done returns already in mockeries,
    (Your thrift, knowledge, prayers, if they do not return in mockeries, what is their return?)
    The mockeries are not you,
    Underneath them and within them I see you lurk,
    I pursue you where none else has pursued you…


  • There is no endowment in man or woman that is not tallied in you,
    There is no virtue, no beauty in man or woman, but as good is in you,
    No pluck, no endurance in others, but as good is in you,
    No pleasure waiting for others, but an equal pleasure waits for you.


  • As for me, I give nothing to any one except I give the like carefully to you,
    I sing the songs of the glory of none, not God, sooner than I sing the songs of the glory of you.


  • Whoever you are! claim your own at any hazard!
    These shows of the East and West are tame compared to you…


  • The hopples fall from your ankles, you find an unfailing sufficiency,
    Old or young, male or female, rude, low, rejected by the rest, whatever you are promulges itself,
    Through birth, life, death, burial, the means are provided, nothing is scanted,
    Through angers, losses, ambition, ignorance, ennui, what you are picks its way.

SEA-DRIFTEdit

Something there is more immortal even than the stars... Something that shall endure longer even than lustrous Jupiter Longer than sun or any revolving satellite, Or the radiant sisters the Pleiades.


On the Beach at Night (1871; 1881)Edit

  • On the beach at night,
    Stands a child with her father,
    Watching the east, the autumn sky.


  • Weep not, child,
    Weep not, my darling,
    With these kisses let me remove your tears,
    The ravening clouds shall not long be victorious,
    They shall not long possess the sky
    , they devour the stars only in apparition,
    Jupiter shall emerge, be patient, watch again another night, the Pleiades shall emerge,
    They are immortal…


  • The great stars and the little ones shall shine out again, they endure,
    The vast immortal suns and the long-enduring pensive moons shall again shine.


  • Something there is,
    (With my lips soothing thee, adding I whisper,
    I give thee the first suggestion, the problem and indirection,)
    Something there is more immortal even than the stars,
    (Many the burials, many the days and nights, passing away,)
    Something that shall endure longer even than lustrous Jupiter
    Longer than sun or any revolving satellite,
    Or the radiant sisters the Pleiades.

BY THE ROADSIDEEdit

I wander'd off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars.
  • When I heard the learn'd astronomer,
    When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
    When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
    When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
    How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
    Till rising and gliding out I wander'd off by myself,
    In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
    Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars.
    • When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer (1865)


  • What you give me I cheerfully accept,
    A little sustenance, a hut and garden, a little money, as I rendezvous with my poems,
    A traveler's lodging and breakfast as journey through the States, — why should I be ashamed to own such gifts? why to advertise for them?
    For I myself am not one who bestows nothing upon man and woman,
    For I bestow upon any man or woman the entrance to all the gifts of the universe.
    • To Rich Givers (1860; 1881)


  • Roaming in thought over the Universe, I saw the little that is Good steadily hastening towards immortality,
    And the vast all that is call'd Evil I saw hastening to merge itself and become lost and dead.
    • Roaming in Thought [After reading Hegel] (1881)


  • Hast never come to thee an hour,
    A sudden gleam divine, precipitating, bursting all these bubbles, fashions, wealth?
    These eager business aims — books, politics, art, amours,
    To utter nothingness?
    • Hast Never Come to Thee an Hour (1881).

DRUM-TAPSEdit

Give me the splendid silent sun with all his beams full-dazzling…
  • Give me the splendid silent sun with all his beams full-dazzling…
    • Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun (1865; 1881)


  • Give me solitude, give me Nature, give me again O Nature your primal sanities!
    • Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun (1865; 1881)


Over the Carnage Rose Prophetic a Voice (1860; 1867)Edit

Be not dishearten'd, affection shall solve the problems of freedom yet,
Those who love each other shall become invincible...
Were you looking to be held together by lawyers?
Or by an agreement on a paper? or by arms?
Nay, nor the world, nor any living thing, will so cohere.
Did you find what I sang erewhile so hard to follow? Why — I was not singing erewhile for you to follow, to understand — nor am I now
  • Over the carnage rose prophetic a voice,
    Be not dishearten'd, affection shall solve the problems of freedom yet,
    Those who love each other shall become invincible
    ,
    They shall yet make Columbia victorious.


  • Sons of the Mother of All, you shall yet be victorious,
    You shall yet laugh to scorn the attacks of all the remainder of the earth.


  • These shall tie you and band you stronger than hoops of iron,
    I, ecstatic, O partners! O lands! with the love of lovers tie you.
    (Were you looking to be held together by lawyers?
    Or by an agreement on a paper? or by arms?
    Nay, nor the world, nor any living thing, will so cohere.)




  • Word over all, beautiful as the sky,
    Beautiful that war and all its deeds of carnage must in time be utterly lost
    ,
    That the hands of the sisters Death and Night incessantly softly wash again, and ever again, this solid world;
    For my enemy is dead, a man divine as myself is dead…
    • Reconciliation (1865-66; 1881)


  • Did you ask dulcet rhymes from me?
    Did you seek the civilian's peaceful and languishing rhymes?
    Did you find what I sang erewhile so hard to follow?
    Why — I was not singing erewhile for you to follow, to understand — nor am I now…
    • To a Certain Civilian (1865; 1871)


  • What to such as you anyhow such a poet as I? therefore leave my works,
    And go lull yourself with what you can understand, and with piano-tunes,
    For I lull nobody, and you will never understand me.
    • To a Certain Civilian (1865; 1871)


  • Turn, and be not alarm'd O Libertad — turn your undying face,
    To where the future, greater than all the past,
    Is swiftly, surely preparing for you.
    • Turn O Libertad (1865; 1871).

MEMORIES OF PRESIDENT LINCOLNEdit

When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd, And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night, I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.

When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'dEdit

  • When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd,
    And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,
    I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.


  • Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,
    Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,
    And thought of him I love.

By Blue Ontario's ShoreEdit

What we are we are, nativity is answer enough to objections, We wield ourselves as a weapon is wielded...


  • By blue Ontario's shore,
    As I mused of these warlike days and of peace return'd, and the dead that return no more,
    A Phantom gigantic superb, with stern visage accosted me,
    Chant me the poem, it said, that comes from the soul of America, chant me the carol of victory,
    And strike up the marches of Libertad, marches more powerful yet,
    And sing me before you go the song of the throes of Democracy. (1)


  • A Nation announcing itself,
    I myself make the only growth by which I can be appreciated,
    I reject none, accept all, then reproduce all in my own forms.
    (2)


  • A breed whose proof is in time and deeds,
    What we are we are, nativity is answer enough to objections,
    We wield ourselves as a weapon is wielded,
    We are powerful and tremendous in ourselves
    (2)


  • Nothing is sinful to us outside of ourselves,
    Whatever appears, whatever does not appear, we are beautiful or sinful in ourselves only.
    (2)


There can be any number of supremes — one does not countervail another any more than one eyesight countervails another, or one life countervails another.
  • (O Mother — O Sisters dear!
    If we are lost, no victor else has destroy'd us,
    It is by ourselves we go down to eternal night.)
    (2)


  • Have you thought there could be but a single supreme?
    There can be any number of supremes — one does not countervail another any more than one eyesight countervails another, or one life countervails another. (3)


Produce great Persons, the rest follows.
  • All is eligible to all,
    All is for individuals, all is for you,

    No condition is prohibited, not God's or any. (3)


  • All comes by the body, only health puts you rapport with the universe.


  • Produce great Persons, the rest follows. (3)


I am he who tauntingly compels men, women, nations, crying, Leap from your seats and contend for your lives!
  • Piety and conformity to them that like,
    Peace, obesity, allegiance, to them that like,
    I am he who tauntingly compels men, women, nations,
    Crying, Leap from your seats and contend for your lives!
    (4)


  • I am he who walks the States with a barb'd tongue, questioning every one I meet,
    Who are you that wanted only to be told what you knew before?
    Who are you that wanted only a book to join you in your nonsense?
    (4)


  • O lands, would you be freer than all that has ever been before?
    If you would be freer than all that has been before, come listen to me. (4)


Ages, precedents, have long been accumulating undirected materials... A work remains, the work of surpassing all they have done.
  • Ages, precedents, have long been accumulating undirected materials,
    America brings builders, and brings its own styles.
    The immortal poets of Asia and Europe have done their work and pass'd to other spheres,
    A work remains, the work of surpassing all they have done. (5)


  • These States are the amplest poem,
    Here is not merely a nation but a teeming Nation of nations… (5)


  • Here the flowing trains, here the crowds, equality, diversity, the soul loves. (5)


That only holds men together which aggregates all in a living principle, as the hold of the limbs of the body or the fibres of plants.
  • O days of the future I believe in you — I isolate myself for your sake,
    O America because you build for mankind I build for you
    ,
    O well-beloved stone-cutters, I lead them who plan with decision and science,
    Lead the present with friendly hand toward the future.
    (Bravas to all impulses sending sane children to the next age!
    But damn that which spends itself with no thought of the stain, pains, dismay, feebleness, it is bequeathing.) (8)


  • To hold men together by paper and seal or by compulsion is no account,
    That only holds men together which aggregates all in a living principle, as the hold of the limbs of the body or the fibres of plants.
    (9)


Nothing out of its place is good, nothing in its place is bad.
  • Of these States the poet is the equable man,
    Not in him but off from him things are grotesque, eccentric, fail of their full returns,
    Nothing out of its place is good, nothing in its place is bad,
    He bestows on every object or quality its fit proportion, neither more nor less,
    He is the arbiter of the diverse, he is the key
    ,
    He is the equalizer of his age and land,
    He supplies what wants supplying, he checks what wants checking,
    In peace out of him speaks the spirit of peace, large, rich, thrifty, building populous towns, encouraging agriculture, arts, commerce, lighting the study of man, the soul, health, immortality, government,
    In war he is the best backer of the war, he fetches artillery as good as the engineer's, he can make every word he speaks draw blood,
    The years straying toward infidelity he withholds by his steady faith,
    He is no arguer, he is judgment, (Nature accepts him absolutely,)
    He judges not as the judge judges but as the sun failing round helpless thing,
    As he sees the farthest he has the most faith,
    His thoughts are the hymns of the praise of things,
    In the dispute on God and eternity he is silent,
    He sees eternity less like a play with a prologue and denouement,
    He sees eternity in men and women, he does not see men and women as dreams or dots.
    (10)


The great Idea,
That, O my brethren, that is the mission of poets.
  • For the great Idea, the idea of perfect and free individuals,
    For that, the bard walks in advance, leader of leaders,
    The attitude of him cheers up slaves and horrifies foreign despots.
    (10)


Are you done with reviews and criticisms of life? animating now to life itself?
  • Without extinction is Liberty, without retrograde is Equality,
    They live in the feelings of young men and the best women,
    (Not for nothing have the indomitable heads of the earth been always ready to fall for Liberty.) (10)


  • For the great Idea,
    That, O my brethren, that is the mission of poets.
    (11)


  • Songs of stern defiance ever ready,
    Songs of the rapid arming and the march,
    The flag of peace quick-folded, and instead the flag we know,
    Warlike flag of the great Idea. (11)


  • Do you see who have left all feudal processes and poems behind them, and assumed the poems and processes of Democracy?
    Are you faithful to things? do you teach what the land and sea, the bodies of men, womanhood, amativeness, heroic angers, teach?

    Have you sped through fleeting customs, popularities?
    Can you hold your hand against all seductions, follies, whirls, fierce contentions? are you very strong? are you really of the whole People?
    Are you not of some coterie? some school or mere religion?
    Are you done with reviews and criticisms of life? animating now to life itself?
    Have you vivified yourself from the maternity of these States?
    Have you too the old ever-fresh forbearance and impartiality? (12)


  • Rhymes and rhymers pass away, poems distill'd from poems pass away,
    The swarms of reflectors and the polite pass, and leave ashes… (13)


  • The proof of a poet shall be sternly deferr'd till his country
    absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorb'd it.
    (13)


  • In the need of songs, philosophy, an appropriate native grand-opera, shipcraft, any craft,
    He or she is greatest who contributes the greatest original practical example. (13)


  • Give me to sing the songs of the great Idea, take all the rest,
    I have loved the earth, sun, animals, I have despised riches,
    I have given alms to every one that ask'd, stood up for the stupid and crazy, devoted my income and labor to others,
    Hated tyrants, argued not concerning God, had patience and indulgence toward the people, taken off my hat to nothing known or unknown,
    Gone freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young, and with the mothers of families,
    Read these leaves to myself in the open air, tried them by trees, stars, rivers,
    Dismiss'd whatever insulted my own soul or defiled my body,
    Claim'd nothing to myself which I have not carefully claim'd for others on the same terms,

    Sped to the camps, and comrades found and accepted from every State,
    (Upon this breast has many a dying soldier lean'd to breathe his last,
    This arm, this hand, this voice, have nourish'd, rais'd, restored,
    To life recalling many a prostrate form;)
    I am willing to wait to be understood by the growth of the taste of myself,
    Rejecting none, permitting all.
    (14)


I am for those that have never been master'd,
For men and women whose tempers have never been master'd, for those whom laws, theories, conventions, can never master.
  • Underneath all, individuals,
    I swear nothing is good to me now that ignores individuals,

    The American compact is altogether with individuals,
    The only government is that which makes minute of individuals,
    The whole theory of the universe is directed unerringly to one single individual — namely to You. (15)


  • Underneath all is the Expression of love for men and women,
    (I swear I have seen enough of mean and impotent modes of expressing love for men and women,
    After this day I take my own modes of expressing love for men and women.)
    (16)


  • I am for those that have never been master'd,
    For men and women whose tempers have never been master'd,
    For those whom laws, theories, conventions, can never master.


  • I am for those who walk abreast with the whole earth,
    Who inaugurate one to inaugurate all.

AUTUMN RIVULETSEdit

The horizon's edge, the flying sea-crow, the fragrance of salt marsh and shore mud, these became part of that child who went forth every day, and who now goes, and will always go forth every day.

There Was a Child Went Forth (1855; 1871)Edit

  • There was a child went forth every day,
    And the first object he look'd upon, that object he became
    ,
    And that object became part of him for the day or a certain part of the day,
    Or for many years or stretching cycles of years.


  • Affection that will not be gainsay'd, the sense of what is real, the thought if after all it should prove unreal,
    The doubts of day-time and the doubts of night-time, the curious whether and how,
    Whether that which appears so is so, or is it all flashes and specks?
    Men and women crowding fast in the streets, if they are not flashes and specks what are they?


  • The hurrying tumbling waves, quick-broken crests, slapping,
    The strata of color'd clouds, the long bar of maroon-tint away solitary by itself, the spread of purity it lies motionless in,
    The horizon's edge, the flying sea-crow, the fragrance of salt marsh and shore mud,
    These became part of that child who went forth every day, and who now goes, and will always go forth every day.

To a Foil'd European Revolutionaire (1856;1881)Edit

Liberty is to be subserv'd whatever occurs... is nothing that is quell'd by one or two failures, or any number of failures...


  • Courage yet, my brother or my sister!
    Keep on — Liberty is to be subserv'd whatever occurs;
    That is nothing that is quell'd by one or two failures, or any number of failures,
    Or by the indifference or ingratitude of the people, or by any unfaithfulness…


When there are no more memories of heroes and martyrs, and when all life and all the souls of men and women are discharged from any part of the earth, then only shall liberty or the idea of liberty be discharged from that part of the earth, and the infidel come into full possession.
  • What we believe in waits latent forever through all the continents,
    Invites no one, promises nothing, sits in calmness and light, is positive and composed, knows no discouragement,
    Waiting patiently, waiting its time.


  • (Not songs of loyalty alone are these,
    But songs of insurrection also,
    For I am the sworn poet of every dauntless rebel the world over,
    And he going with me leaves peace and routine behind him,
    And stakes his life to be lost at any moment.)


  • The battle rages with many a loud alarm and frequent advance and retreat,
    The infidel triumphs, or supposes he triumphs,
    The prison, scaffold, garrote, handcuffs, iron necklace and leadballs do their work,
    The named and unnamed heroes pass to other spheres,
    The great speakers and writers are exiled, they lie sick in distant lands,
    The cause is asleep, the strongest throats are choked with their own blood,
    The young men droop their eyelashes toward the ground when they meet;
    But for all this Liberty has not gone out of the place, nor the infidel enter'd into full possession.


  • When liberty goes out of a place it is not the first to go, nor the second or third to go,
    It waits for all the rest to go, it is the last.


  • When there are no more memories of heroes and martyrs,
    And when all life and all the souls of men and women are discharged from any part of the earth,
    Then only shall liberty or the idea of liberty be discharged from that part of the earth,
    And the infidel come into full possession.


My spirit to yours dear brother, Do not mind because many sounding your name do not understand you, I do not sound your name, but I understand you...

To Him That Was Crucified (1860; 1881)Edit

  • My spirit to yours dear brother,
    Do not mind because many sounding your name do not understand you,
    I do not sound your name, but I understand you,

    I specify you with joy O my comrade to salute you, and to salute those who are with you, before and since, and those to come also,
    That we all labor together transmitting the same charge and succession,
    We few equals indifferent of lands, indifferent of times,
    We, enclosers of all continents, all castes, allowers of all theologies,

    Compassionaters, perceivers, rapport of men,
    We walk silent among disputes and assertions, but reject not the disputers nor any thing that is asserted,
    We hear the bawling and din, we are reach'd at by divisions, jealousies, recriminations on every side,
    They close peremptorily upon us to surround us, my comrade,
    Yet we walk unheld, free, the whole earth over, journeying up and down till we make our ineffaceable mark upon time and the diverse eras,
    Till we saturate time and eras, that the men and women of races, ages to come, may prove brethren and lovers as we are.


To a Common Prostitute (1860)Edit

Why, who makes much of a miracle? As to me I know of nothing else but miracles...


  • Be composed — be at ease with me — I am Walt Whitman, liberal and lusty as Nature,
    Not till the sun excludes you do I exclude you,
    Not till the waters refuse to glisten for you and the leaves to rustle for you, do my words refuse to glisten and rustle for you.


  • My girl I appoint with you an appointment, and I charge you that you make preparation to be worthy to meet me,
    And I charge you that you be patient and perfect till I come.


  • Till then I salute you with a significant look that you do not forget me.


Miracles (1856; 1881)Edit

To me every hour of the light and dark is a miracle,
Every cubic inch of space is a miracle...


  • Why, who makes much of a miracle?
    As to me I know of nothing else but miracles...


  • The wonderfulness of the sundown, or of stars shining so quiet and bright,
    Or the exquisite delicate thin curve of the new moon in spring;
    These with the rest, one and all, are to me miracles,
    The whole referring, yet each distinct and in its place.


  • To me every hour of the light and dark is a miracle,
    Every cubic inch of space is a miracle,

    Every square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same,
    Every foot of the interior swarms with the same.
    To me the sea is a continual miracle,
    The fishes that swim — the rocks — the motion of the waves — the ships with men in them,
    What stranger miracles are there?




Rest not till you rivet and publish yourself of your own Personality.
  • Rest not till you rivet and publish yourself of your own Personality.
    • To A Pupil


  • Unfolded out of the sympathy of the woman is all sympathy;
    A man is a great thing upon the earth and through eternity, but every jot of the greatness of man is unfolded out of woman;
    First the man is shaped in the woman, he can then be shaped in himself.
    • Unfolded Out of the Folds


  • What am I after all but a child, pleas'd with the sound of my own name? repeating it over and over;
    I stand apart to hear — it never tires me.
    To you your name also;
    Did you think there was nothing but two or three pronunciations in the sound of your name?
    • What Am I After All


  • Who believes not only in our globe with its sun and moon, but in other globes with their suns and moons,
    Who, constructing the house of himself or herself, not for a day but for all time, sees races, eras, dates, generations,
    The past, the future, dwelling there, like space, inseparable together.
    • Kosmos.

Who Learns My Lesson Complete?Edit

The great laws take and effuse without argument, I am of the same style, for I am their friend


  • The great laws take and effuse without argument,
    I am of the same style, for I am their friend…
I know it is wonderful, but my eyesight is equally wonderful... And that my soul embraces you this hour, and we affect each other without ever seeing each other, and never perhaps to see each other, is every bit as wonderful.
  • I cannot say to any person what I hear — I cannot say it to myself — it is very wonderful.


  • It is no small matter, this round and delicious globe moving so exactly in its orbit for ever and ever, without one jolt or the untruth of a single second,
    I do not think it was made in six days, nor in ten thousand years, nor ten billions of years,
    Nor plann'd and built one thing after another as an architect plans and builds a house.


  • I do not think seventy years is the time of a man or woman,
    Nor that seventy millions of years is the time of a man or woman,
    Nor that years will ever stop the existence of me, or any one else.


  • Is it wonderful that I should be immortal? as every one is immortal;
    I know it is wonderful, but my eyesight is equally wonderful, and how I was conceived in my mother's womb is equally wonderful,
    And pass'd from a babe in the creeping trance of a couple of summers and winters to articulate and walk — all this is equally wonderful.
    And that my soul embraces you this hour, and we affect each other without ever seeing each other, and never perhaps to see each other, is every bit as wonderful.
    And that I can think such thoughts as these is just as wonderful,
    And that I can remind you, and you think them and know them to be true, is just as wonderful.


TestsEdit

Not traditions, not the outer authorities are the judges, they are the judges of outer authorities and of all traditions...


  • All submit to them where they sit, inner, secure, unapproachable to analysis in the soul,
    Not traditions, not the outer authorities are the judges,
    They are the judges of outer authorities and of all traditions
    ,
    They corroborate as they go only whatever corroborates themselves, and touches themselves;
    For all that, they have it forever in themselves to corroborate far and near without one exception.


Proud Music of the StormEdit

Now the great organ sounds...


  • Come forward O my soul, and let the rest retire,
    Listen, lose not, it is toward thee they tend,
    Parting the midnight, entering my slumber-chamber,
    For thee they sing and dance O soul. (2)


The separation long, but now the wandering done,
The journey done, the journeyman come home,
And man and art with Nature fused again.
  • Now the great organ sounds,
    Tremulous, while underneath, (as the hid footholds of the earth,
    On which arising rest, and leaping forth depend,
    All shapes of beauty, grace and strength, all hues we know,
    Green blades of grass and warbling birds, children that gambol and play, the clouds of heaven above,)
    The strong base stands, and its pulsations intermits not,
    Bathing, supporting, merging all the rest, maternity of all the rest,
    And with it every instrument in multitudes,
    The players playing, all the world's musicians,
    The solemn hymns and masses rousing adoration,
    All passionate heart-chants, sorrowful appeals,
    The measureless sweet vocalists of ages,
    And for their solvent setting earth's own diapason,
    Of winds and woods and mighty ocean waves,
    A new composite orchestra, binder of years and climes, ten-fold renewer,
    As of the far-back days the poets tell, the Paradiso,
    The straying thence, the separation long, but now the wandering done,
    The journey done, the journeyman come home,
    And man and art with Nature fused again.
    (2)


Come, for I have found the clew I sought so long,
Let us go forth refresh'd amid the day,
Cheerfully tallying life, walking the world, the real,
Nourish'd henceforth by our celestial dream.
  • Give me to hold all sounds, (I madly struggling cry,)
    Fill me with all the voices of the universe,
    Endow me with their throbbings, Nature's also,
    The tempests, waters, winds, operas and chants, marches and dances,
    Utter, pour in, for I would take them all! (5)


  • Then I woke softly,
    And pausing, questioning awhile the music of my dream,
    And questioning all those reminiscences, the tempest in its fury,
    And all the songs of sopranos and tenors,
    And those rapt oriental dances of religious fervor,
    And the sweet varied instruments, and the diapason of organs,
    And all the artless plaints of love and grief and death,
    I said to my silent curious soul out of the bed of the slumber-chamber,
    Come, for I have found the clew I sought so long,
    Let us go forth refresh'd amid the day,
    Cheerfully tallying life, walking the world, the real,
    Nourish'd henceforth by our celestial dream.
    (6)


  • Haply what thou hast heard O soul was not the sound of winds,
    Nor dream of raging storm, nor sea-hawk's flapping wings nor harsh scream…(6)


  • But to a new rhythmus fitted for thee,
    Poems bridging the way from Life to Death, vaguely wafted in night air, uncaught, unwritten,
    Which let us go forth in the bold day and write. (6).

WHISPERS OF HEAVENLY DEATHEdit

Darest thou now O soul,
Walk out with me toward the unknown region,
Where neither ground is for the feet nor any path to follow?


  • Darest thou now O soul,
    Walk out with me toward the unknown region,
    Where neither ground is for the feet nor any path to follow?
    • Darest Thou Now O Soul


  • I see, just see skyward, great cloud-masses,
    Mournfully slowly they roll, silently swelling and mixing,
    With at times a half-dimm'd sadden'd far-off star,
    Appearing and disappearing.
    • Whispers of Heavenly Death


Chanting the Square DeificEdit

Chanting the square deific, out of the One advancing, out of the sides,
Out of the old and new, out of the square entirely divine...


1


  • Chanting the square deific, out of the One advancing, out of the sides,
    Out of the old and new, out of the square entirely divine,
    Solid, four-sided, (all the sides needed,) from this side Jehovah am I,
    Old Brahm I, and I Saturnius am;
    Not Time affects me — I am Time, old, modern as any,
    Unpersuadable, relentless, executing righteous judgments
    ,
    As the Earth, the Father, the brown old Kronos, with laws,
    Aged beyond computation, yet never new, ever with those mighty laws rolling,
    Relentless I forgive no man — whoever sins dies — I will have that man's life;
    Therefore let none expect mercy — have the seasons, gravitation, the appointed days, mercy? no more have I,
    But as the seasons and gravitation, and as all the appointed days that forgive not,
    I dispense from this side judgments inexorable without the least remorse.


My charity has no death — my wisdom dies not, neither early nor late, and my sweet love bequeath'd here and elsewhere never dies.
2


  • Consolator most mild, the promis'd one advancing,
    With gentle hand extended, the mightier God am I,
    Foretold by prophets and poets in their most rapt prophecies and poems,
    From this side, lo! the Lord Christ gazes — lo! Hermes I — lo! mine is Hercules' face,
    All sorrow, labor, suffering, I, tallying it, absorb in myself,
    Many times have I been rejected, taunted, put in prison, and crucified, and many times shall be again
    ,
    All the world have I given up for my dear brothers' and sisters' sake, for the soul's sake,
    Wending my way through the homes of men, rich or poor, with the kiss of affection,
    For I am affection, I am the cheer-bringing God, with hope and all-enclosing charity,
    With indulgent words as to children, with fresh and sane words, mine only,
    Young and strong I pass knowing well I am destin'd myself to an early death;
    But my charity has no death — my wisdom dies not, neither early nor late,
    And my sweet love bequeath'd here and elsewhere never dies.


Permanent here from my side, warlike, equal with any, real as any, nor time nor change shall ever change me or my words.
3


  • Aloof, dissatisfied, plotting revolt,
    Comrade of criminals, brother of slaves,
    Crafty, despised
    , a drudge, ignorant,
    With sudra face and worn brow, black, but in the depths of my heart, proud as any,
    Lifted now and always against whoever scorning assumes to rule me,
    Morose, full of guile, full of reminiscences, brooding, with many wiles
    ,
    (Though it was thought I was baffled, and dispel'd, and my wiles done, but that will never be,)
    Defiant, I, Satan, still live, still utter words, in new lands duly appearing, (and old ones also,)
    Permanent here from my side, warlike, equal with any, real as any,
    Nor time nor change shall ever change me or my words.


Life of the great round world, the sun and stars, and of man, I, the general soul, Here the square finishing, the solid, I the most solid, Breathe my breath also through these songs.
4


  • Santa Spirita, breather, life,
    Beyond the light, lighter than light,
    Beyond the flames of hell, joyous, leaping easily above hell,
    Beyond Paradise, perfumed solely with mine own perfume,
    Including all life on earth, touching, including God, including Saviour and Satan,
    Ethereal, pervading all, (for without me what were all? what were God?)
    Essence of forms, life of the real identities, permanent, positive, (namely the unseen,)
    Life of the great round world, the sun and stars, and of man, I, the general soul,
    Here the square finishing, the solid, I the most solid,
    Breathe my breath also through these songs.

AssurancesEdit

I do not doubt but the majesty and beauty of the world are latent in any iota of the world...


  • I do not doubt but the majesty and beauty of the world are latent in any iota of the world,
    I do not doubt I am limitless, and that the universes are limitless, in vain I try to think how limitless
    ,
    I do not doubt that the orbs and the systems of orbs play their swift sports through the air on purpose, and that I shall one day be eligible to do as much as they, and more than they,
    I do not doubt that temporary affairs keep on and on millions of years,
    I do not doubt interiors have their interiors, and exteriors have their exteriors, and that the eyesight has another eyesight, and the hearing another hearing, and the voice another voice...


  • I do not doubt that whatever can possibly happen anywhere at any time, is provided for in the inherences of things,
    I do not think Life provides for all and for Time and Space, but I believe Heavenly Death provides for all.

A Noiseless Patient SpiderEdit

A noiseless patient spider... launch'd forth filament, filament, filament out of itself,
Ever unreeling them, ever tirelessly speeding them...


  • A noiseless patient spider,
    I mark'd where on a little promontory it stood isolated,
    Mark'd how to explore the vacant vast surrounding,
    It launch'd forth filament, filament, filament out of itself,
    Ever unreeling them, ever tirelessly speeding them.


  • And you O my soul where you stand,
    Surrounded, detached, in measureless oceans of space,
    Ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the spheres to connect them,
    Till the bridge you will need be form'd, till the ductile anchor hold,
    Till the gossamer thread you fling catch somewhere, O my soul.


To One Shortly to DieEdit

The sun bursts through in unlooked-for directions...


  • From all the rest I single out you, having a message for you,
    You are to die — let others tell you what they please, I cannot prevaricate,
    I am exact and merciless, but I love you — there is no escape for you.


  • I sit quietly by, I remain faithful,
    I am more than nurse, more than parent or neighbor,
    I absolve you from all except yourself spiritual bodily, that is eternal, you yourself will surely escape,
    The corpse you will leave will be but excrementitious.


  • The sun bursts through in unlooked-for directions,
    Strong thoughts fill you and confidence, you smile,
    You forget you are sick, as I forget you are sick,
    You do not see the medicines, you do not mind the weeping friends,
    I am with you,
    I exclude others from you, there is nothing to be commiserated,
    I do not commiserate, I congratulate you.


Night on the PrairiesEdit

I was thinking the day most splendid till I saw what the not-day exhibited


  • I was thinking the day most splendid till I saw what the not-day exhibited,
    I was thinking this globe enough till there sprang out so noiseless around me myriads of other globes.


  • Now while the great thoughts of space and eternity fill me I will measure myself by them,
    And now touch'd with the lives of other globes arrived as far along as those of the earth,
    Or waiting to arrive, or pass'd on farther than those of the earth,
    I henceforth no more ignore them than I ignore my own life,
    Or the lives of the earth arrived as far as mine, or waiting to arrive.


  • O I see now that life cannot exhibit all to me, as the day cannot,
    I see that I am to wait for what will be exhibited by death.


Pensive and FalteringEdit

  • Pensive and faltering,
    The words the Dead I write,
    For living are the Dead,
    (Haply the only living, only real,
    And I the apparition, I the spectre.)


THOU MOTHER WITH THY EQUAL BROODEdit

Life and Nature are not great with reference to the present only,
But greater still from what is yet to come,
Out of that formula for thee I sing...


Thou Mother with Thy Equal BroodEdit

1


  • Thou Mother with thy equal brood,
    Thou varied chain of different States, yet one identity only,
    A special song before I go I'd sing o'er all the rest,
    For thee, the future.


  • I'd sow a seed for thee of endless Nationality,
    I'd fashion thy ensemble including body and soul,
    I'd show away ahead thy real Union, and how it may be accomplish'd.


  • Belief I sing, and preparation;
    As Life and Nature are not great with reference to the present only,
    But greater still from what is yet to come,
    Out of that formula for thee I sing.


2
Through thy idea, lo, the immortal reality!
Through thy reality, lo, the immortal idea!


  • Thou! mounting higher, diving deeper than we knew, thou transcendental Union!
    By thee fact to be justified, blended with thought,
    Thought of man justified, blended with God,
    Through thy idea, lo, the immortal reality!
    Through thy reality, lo, the immortal idea!


3


  • Brain of the New World, what a task is thine,
    To formulate the Modern — out of the peerless grandeur of the modern,
    Out of thyself, comprising science, to recast poems, churches, art,
    (Recast, may-be discard them, end them — maybe their work is done, who knows?)
    By vision, hand, conception, on the background of the mighty past, the dead,
    To limn with absolute faith the mighty living present.


  • Thou but the apples, long, long, long a-growing,
    The fruit of all the Old ripening to-day in thee.


4


  • Sail, sail thy best, ship of Democracy,
    Of value is thy freight, 'tis not the Present only,
    The Past is also stored in thee,
    Thou holdest not the venture of thyself alone, not of the Western continent alone,
    Earth's résumé entire floats on thy keel O ship, is steadied by thy spars,
    With thee Time voyages in trust, the antecedent nations sink or swim with thee


5


Beautiful world of new superber birth that rises to my eyes, like a limitless golden cloud filling the western sky, emblem of general maternity lifted above all...
  • Beautiful world of new superber birth that rises to my eyes,
    Like a limitless golden cloud filling the western sky,
    Emblem of general maternity lifted above all,
    Sacred shape of the bearer of daughters and sons...


  • Thou wonder world yet undefined, unform'd, neither do I define thee,
    How can I pierce the impenetrable blank of the future?
    I feel thy ominous greatness evil as well as good,
    I watch thee advancing, absorbing the present, transcending the past,
    I see thy light lighting, and thy shadow shadowing, as if the entire globe,
    But I do not undertake to define thee, hardly to comprehend thee,
    I but thee name, thee prophesy, as now,
    I merely thee ejaculate!


Thy saviours countless, latent within thyself, thy bibles incessant within thyself, equal to any, divine as any …
  • Thee as another equally needed sun, radiant, ablaze, swift-moving, fructifying all,
    Thee risen in potent cheerfulness and joy, in endless great hilarity,
    Scattering for good the cloud that hung so long, that weigh'd so long upon the mind of man,
    The doubt, suspicion, dread, of gradual, certain decadence of man;
    Thee in thy larger, saner brood of female, male — thee in thy athletes, moral, spiritual, South, North, West, East,
    (To thy immortal breasts, Mother of All, thy every daughter, son, endear'd alike, forever equal,)
    Thee in thy own musicians, singers, artists, unborn yet, but certain,
    Thee in thy moral wealth and civilization, (until which thy proudest material civilization must remain in vain,)
    Thee in thy all-supplying, all-enclosing worship — thee in no single bible, saviour, merely,
    Thy saviours countless, latent within thyself, thy bibles incessant within thyself, equal to any, divine as any ...

    These! these in thee, (certain to come,) to-day I prophesy.


6


They each and all shall lift and pass away and cease from thee, while thou, Time's spirals rounding, out of thyself, thyself still extricating, fusing, equable, natural, mystical Union thou, (the mortal with immortal blent,) shalt soar toward the fulfilment of the future, the spirit of the body and the mind, the soul, its destinies...
  • Land tolerating all, accepting all, not for the good alone, all good for thee,
    Land in the realms of God to be a realm unto thyself,
    Under the rule of God to be a rule unto thyself.


  • Not for success alone,
    Not to fair-sail unintermitted always,
    The storm shall dash thy face, the murk of war and worse than war shall cover thee all over,
    (Wert capable of war, its tug and trials? be capable of peace, its trials,
    For the tug and mortal strain of nations come at last in prosperous
    peace, not war;)

    In many a smiling mask death shall approach beguiling thee, thou in disease shalt swelter,
    The livid cancer spread its hideous claws, clinging upon thy breasts, seeking to strike thee deep within,
    Consumption of the worst, moral consumption, shall rouge thy face with hectic,
    But thou shalt face thy fortunes, thy diseases, and surmount them all,
    Whatever they are to-day and whatever through time they may be,
    They each and all shall lift and pass away and cease from thee,
    While thou, Time's spirals rounding, out of thyself, thyself still extricating, fusing,
    Equable, natural, mystical Union thou, (the mortal with immortal blent,)
    Shalt soar toward the fulfilment of the future, the spirit of the body and the mind,
    The soul, its destinies.


  • The soul, its destinies, the real real,
    (Purport of all these apparitions of the real;)
    In thee America, the soul, its destinies,
    Thou globe of globes! thou wonder nebulous!


  • Thou mental, moral orb — thou New, indeed new, Spiritual World!
    The Present holds thee not — for such vast growth as thine,
    For such unparallel'd flight as thine, such brood as thine,
    The FUTURE only holds thee and can hold thee.


FROM NOON TO STARRY NIGHTEdit

Thou Orb Aloft Full-DazzlingEdit

Thou orb aloft full-dazzling! thou hot October noon!


  • Thou orb aloft full-dazzling! thou hot October noon!


  • Hear me illustrious!
    Thy lover me, for always I have loved thee,
    Even as basking babe, then happy boy alone by some wood edge, thy touching-distant beams enough,
    Or man matured, or young or old, as now to thee I launch my invocation.


I know before the fitting man all Nature yields, though answering not in words, the skies, trees, hear his voice...
  • (Thou canst not with thy dumbness me deceive,
    I know before the fitting man all Nature yields,
    Though answering not in words, the skies, trees, hear his voice — and thou O sun,
    As for thy throes, thy perturbations, sudden breaks and shafts of flame gigantic,
    I understand them, I know those flames, those perturbations well.)


  • O'er all the globe that turns its face to thee shining in space,
    Thou that impartially enfoldest all, not only continents, seas,
    Thou that to grapes and weeds and little wild flowers givest so liberally,
    Shed, shed thyself on mine and me, with but a fleeting ray out of thy million millions,
    Strike through these chants.


FacesEdit

  • The Lord advances, and yet advances,
    Always the shadow in front, always the reach'd hand bringing up the
    laggards.


  • Out of this face emerge banners and horses — O superb! I see what is coming,
    I see the high pioneer-caps, see staves of runners clearing the way,
    I hear victorious drums.


  • These faces bear testimony slumbering or awake,
    They show their descent from the Master himself.
    Off the word I have spoken I except not one — red, white, black, are all deific,
    In each house is the ovum, it comes forth after a thousand years.


The Mystic TrumpeterEdit

Blow again trumpeter! and for thy theme, take now the enclosing theme of all, the solvent and the setting, Love … No other theme but love..


  • Hark, some wild trumpeter, some strange musician,
    Hovering unseen in air, vibrates capricious tunes to-night.


  • Blow trumpeter free and clear, I follow thee,
    While at thy liquid prelude, glad, serene,
    The fretting world, the streets, the noisy hours of day withdraw,
    A holy calm descends like dew upon me,
    I walk in cool refreshing night the walks of Paradise,
    I scent the grass, the moist air and the roses;
    Thy song expands my numb'd imbonded spirit, thou freest, launchest me,
    Floating and basking upon heaven's lake.


Love, that is day and night — love, that is sun and moon and stars, Love, that is crimson, sumptuous, sick with perfume, no other words but words of love, no other thought but love.
  • Blow again trumpeter! and for thy theme,
    Take now the enclosing theme of all, the solvent and the setting,
    Love, that is pulse of all, the sustenance and the pang,
    The heart of man and woman all for love,
    No other theme but love — knitting, enclosing, all-diffusing love.


  • Love, that is all the earth to lovers — love, that mocks time and space,
    Love, that is day and night — love, that is sun and moon and stars,
    Love, that is crimson, sumptuous, sick with perfume,
    No other words but words of love, no other thought but love.


  • O trumpeter, methinks I am myself the instrument thou playest,
    Thou melt'st my heart, my brain — thou movest, drawest, changest them at will;
    And now thy sullen notes send darkness through me,
    Thou takest away all cheering light, all hope,
    I see the enslaved, the overthrown, the hurt, the opprest of the whole earth,
    I feel the measureless shame and humiliation of my race, it becomes all mine
    ,
    Mine too the revenges of humanity, the wrongs of ages, baffled feuds and hatreds,
    Utter defeat upon me weighs — all lost — the foe victorious,
    (Yet 'mid the ruins Pride colossal stands unshaken to the last,
    Endurance, resolution to the last.)


The ocean fill'd with joy — the atmosphere all joy!
Joy! joy! in freedom, worship, love! joy in the ecstasy of life!
  • Now trumpeter for thy close,
    Vouchsafe a higher strain than any yet,
    Sing to my soul, renew its languishing faith and hope,
    Rouse up my slow belief, give me some vision of the future,
    Give me for once its prophecy and joy.


  • O glad, exulting, culminating song!
    A vigor more than earth's is in thy notes,
    Marches of victory — man disenthral'd — the conqueror at last,
    Hymns to the universal God from universal man — all joy!

    A reborn race appears — a perfect world, all joy!
    Women and men in wisdom innocence and health — all joy!
    Riotous laughing bacchanals fill'd with joy!
    War, sorrow, suffering gone — the rank earth purged — nothing but joy left!
    The ocean fill'd with joy — the atmosphere all joy!
    Joy! joy! in freedom, worship, love! joy in the ecstasy of life!
    Enough to merely be! enough to breathe!
    Joy! joy! all over joy!


All Is TruthEdit

Henceforth I will go celebrate any thing I see or am, and sing and laugh and deny nothing.


  • O me, man of slack faith so long,
    Standing aloof, denying portions so long,
    Only aware to-day of compact all-diffused truth,
    Discovering to-day there is no lie or form of lie, and can be none, but grows as inevitably upon itself as the truth does upon itself
    ,
    Or as any law of the earth or any natural production of the earth does.
    (This is curious and may not be realized immediately, but it must be realized,
    I feel in myself that I represent falsehoods equally with the rest,
    And that the universe does.
    )


  • The truth includes all, and is compact just as much as space is compact,
    And that there is no flaw or vacuum in the amount of the truth — but that all is truth without exception;
    And henceforth I will go celebrate any thing I see or am,
    And sing and laugh and deny nothing.


A Riddle SongEdit

Indifferently, 'mid public, private haunts, in solitude, behind the mountain and the wood, companion of the city's busiest streets, through the assemblage, it and its radiations constantly glide.


  • That which eludes this verse and any verse,
    Unheard by sharpest ear, unform'd in clearest eye or cunningest mind,
    Nor lore nor fame, nor happiness nor wealth,
    And yet the pulse of every heart and life throughout the world incessantly,
    Which you and I and all pursuing ever ever miss,
    Open but still a secret, the real of the real, an illusion,
    Costless, vouchsafed to each, yet never man the owner
    ,
    Which poets vainly seek to put in rhyme, historians in prose,
    Which sculptor never chisel'd yet, nor painter painted,
    Which vocalist never sung, nor orator nor actor ever utter'd,
    Invoking here and now I challenge for my song.


  • Indifferently, 'mid public, private haunts, in solitude,
    Behind the mountain and the wood,
    Companion of the city's busiest streets, through the assemblage,
    It and its radiations constantly glide.
Haply God's riddle it, so vague and yet so certain,
The soul for it, and all the visible universe for it,
And heaven at last for it.
  • How many travelers started from their homes and neer return'd!
    How much of genius boldly staked and lost for it!
    What countless stores of beauty, love, ventur'd for it!
    How all superbest deeds since Time began are traceable to it — and shall be to the end!
    How all heroic martyrdoms to it!
    How, justified by it, the horrors, evils, battles of the earth!
    How the bright fascinating lambent flames of it, in every age and land, have drawn men's eyes,
    Rich as a sunset on the Norway coast, the sky, the islands, and the cliffs,
    Or midnight's silent glowing northern lights unreachable.
    Haply God's riddle it, so vague and yet so certain,
    The soul for it, and all the visible universe for it,
    And heaven at last for it.


ExcelsiorEdit

Who has gone farthest? for I would go farther...


  • Who has gone farthest? for I would go farther,
    And who has been just? for I would be the most just person of the earth,
    And who most cautious? for I would be more cautious,
    And who has been happiest? O I think it is I — I think no one was ever happier than I,
    And who has lavish'd all? for I lavish constantly the best I have... And who thinks the amplest thoughts? for I would surround those thoughts,
    And who has made hymns fit for the earth? for I am mad with devouring ecstasy to make joyous hymns for the whole earth.


Ah Poverties, Wincings, and Sulky RetreatsEdit

Ah think not you finally triumph, my real self has yet to come forth, it shall yet march forth o'ermastering, till all lies beneath me, it shall yet stand up the soldier of ultimate victory.


  • Ah poverties, wincings, and sulky retreats,
    Ah you foes that in conflict have overcome me,
    (For what is my life or any man's life but a conflict with foes, the
    old, the incessant war?)
    You degradations, you tussle with passions and appetites,
    You smarts from dissatisfied friendships, (ah wounds the sharpest of all!)
    You toil of painful and choked articulations, you meannesses,
    You shallow tongue-talks at tables, (my tongue the shallowest of any;)
    You broken resolutions, you racking angers, you smother'd ennuis!
    Ah think not you finally triumph, my real self has yet to come forth,
    It shall yet march forth o'ermastering, till all lies beneath me,
    It shall yet stand up the soldier of ultimate victory.


ThoughtsEdit

What will the people say at last?
  • Of public opinion,
    Of a calm and cool fiat sooner or later, (how impassive! how certain and final!)

    Of the President with pale face asking secretly to himself, What will the people say at last?
    Of the frivolous Judge — of the corrupt Congressman, Governor, Mayor — of such as these standing helpless and exposed,
    Of the mumbling and screaming priest, (soon, soon deserted,)
    Of the lessening year by year of venerableness, and of the dicta of officers, statutes, pulpits, schools,
    Of the rising forever taller and stronger and broader of the intuitions of men and women, and of Self-esteem and Personality;
    Of the true New World — of the Democracies resplendent en-masse,
    Of the conformity of politics, armies, navies, to them,
    Of the shining sun by them — of the inherent light, greater than the rest,
    Of the envelopment of all by them, and the effusion of all from them.

MediumsEdit

  • They shall arise in the States,
    They shall report Nature, laws, physiology, and happiness,
    They shall illustrate Democracy and the kosmos,
    They shall be alimentive, amative, perceptive,
    They shall be complete women and men, their pose brawny and supple, their drink water, their blood clean and clear
    ...


  • Strong and sweet shall their tongues be, poems and materials of poems shall come from their lives, they shall be makers and finders,
    Of them and of their works shall emerge divine conveyers, to convey gospels,
    Characters, events, retrospections, shall be convey'd in gospels, trees, animals, waters, shall be convey'd,
    Death, the future, the invisible faith, shall all be convey'd.

Weave in, My Hardy LifeEdit

  • Weave in, weave in, my hardy life,
    Weave yet a soldier strong and full for great campaigns to come,
    Weave in red blood, weave sinews in like ropes, the senses, sight weave in,
    Weave lasting sure, weave day and night the wet, the warp, incessant weave, tire not,
    (We know not what the use O life, nor know the aim, the end, nor really aught we know,
    But know the work, the need goes on and shall go on, the death-envelop'd march of peace as well as war goes on,)
    For great campaigns of peace the same the wiry threads to weave,
    We know not why or what, yet weave, forever weave.


From Far Dakota's CanyonsEdit

From unsuspected parts a fierce and momentary proof, (The sun there at the centre though conceal'd, Electric life forever at the centre,) Breaks forth a lightning flash.


  • As sitting in dark days,
    Lone, sulky, through the time's thick murk looking in vain for light, for hope,
    From unsuspected parts a fierce and momentary proof,
    (The sun there at the centre though conceal'd,
    Electric life forever at the centre,)
    Breaks forth a lightning flash.


Old War-DreamsEdit

  • Long have they pass'd, faces and trenches and fields,
    Where through the carnage I moved with a callous composure, or away from the fallen,
    Onward I sped at the time — but now of their forms at night,
    I dream, I dream, I dream.


As I Walk These Broad Majestic DaysEdit

The rapt promises and lumine of seers, the spiritual world, these centuries-lasting songs, and our visions, the visions of poets, the most solid announcements of any.


  • I too announce solid things,
    Science, ships, politics, cities, factories, are not nothing
    ,
    Like a grand procession to music of distant bugles pouring, triumphantly moving, and grander heaving in sight,
    They stand for realities — all is as it should be.


  • Then my realities;
    What else is so real as mine?

    Libertad and the divine average, freedom to every slave on the face of the earth,
    The rapt promises and lumine of seers, the spiritual world, these centuries-lasting songs,
    And our visions, the visions of poets, the most solid announcements of any.


A Clear MidnightEdit

  • This is thy hour O Soul, thy free flight into the wordless,
    Away from books, away from art, the day erased, the lesson done,
    Thee fully forth emerging, silent, gazing, pondering the themes thou lovest best,
    Night, sleep, death and the stars.


SONGS OF PARTINGEdit

O soul, we have positively appear'd — that is enough.


  • O soul, we have positively appear'd — that is enough.
    • As the Time Draws Nigh


Years of the ModernEdit

I see this day the People beginning their landmarks, (all others give way;)
Never were such sharp questions ask'd as this day...


  • I see men marching and countermarching by swift millions,
    I see the frontiers and boundaries of the old aristocracies broken,
    I see the landmarks of European kings removed,
    I see this day the People beginning their landmarks, (all others give way;)

    Never were such sharp questions ask'd as this day,
    Never was average man, his soul, more energetic, more like a God,
    Lo, how he urges and urges, leaving the masses no rest!


  • Are all nations communing? is there going to be but one heart to the globe?
    Is humanity forming en-masse? for lo, tyrants tremble, crowns grow dim,
    The earth, restive, confronts a new era, perhaps a general divine war,
    No one knows what will happen next, such portents fill the days and nights;
    Years prophetical! the space ahead as I walk, as I vainly try to pierce it, is full of phantoms,
    Unborn deeds, things soon to be, project their shapes around me,
    This incredible rush and heat, this strange ecstatic fever of dreams O years!
    Your dreams O years, how they penetrate through me! (I know not whether I sleep or wake;)
    The perform'd America and Europe grow dim, retiring in shadow behind me,
    The unperform'd, more gigantic than ever, advance, advance upon me.


Ashes of SoldiersEdit

Dearest comrades, all is over and long gone, But love is not over...


  • Phantoms of countless lost,
    Invisible to the rest henceforth become my companions,
    Follow me ever — desert me not while I live.


  • Dearest comrades, all is over and long gone,
    But love is not over
    — and what love, O comrades!


  • Perfume therefore my chant, O love, immortal love,
    Give me to bathe the memories of all dead soldiers,
    Shroud them, embalm them, cover them all over with tender pride.
    Perfume all — make all wholesome,
    Make these ashes to nourish and blossom,
    O love, solve all, fructify all with the last chemistry.


ThoughtsEdit

  • How many hold despairingly yet to the models departed, caste, myths, obedience, compulsion, and to infidelity,
    How few see the arrived models
    , the athletes, the Western States, or see freedom or spirituality, or hold any faith in results,
    (But I see the athletes, and I see the results of the war glorious and inevitable, and they again leading to other results.)


  • Of this Union welded in blood, of the solemn price paid, of the unnamed lost ever present in my mind;


Song at SunsetEdit

I too carol the sun, usher'd or at noon, or as now, setting, I too throb to the brain and beauty of the earth and of all the growths of the earth, I too have felt the resistless call of myself.


  • Open mouth of my soul uttering gladness,
    Eyes of my soul seeing perfection,
    Natural life of me faithfully praising things,
    Corroborating forever the triumph of things.


  • Illustrious every one!
    Illustrious what we name space, sphere of unnumber'd spirits,
    Illustrious the mystery of motion in all beings, even the tiniest insect,
    Illustrious the attribute of speech, the senses, the body,
    Illustrious the passing light — illustrious the pale reflection on the new moon in the western sky,
    Illustrious whatever I see or hear or touch, to the last.


  • Good in all,
    In the satisfaction and aplomb of animals,
    In the annual return of the seasons,
    In the hilarity of youth,
    In the strength and flush of manhood,
    In the grandeur and exquisiteness of old age,
    In the superb vistas of death.


Wonderful how I celebrate you and myself
How my thoughts play subtly at the spectacles around!
  • Wonderful to depart!
    Wonderful to be here!

    The heart, to jet the all-alike and innocent blood!
    To breathe the air, how delicious!
    To speak — to walk — to seize something by the hand!
    To prepare for sleep, for bed, to look on my rose-color'd flesh!
    To be conscious of my body, so satisfied, so large!
    To be this incredible God I am!
    To have gone forth among other Gods, these men and women I love.


  • Wonderful how I celebrate you and myself
    How my thoughts play subtly at the spectacles around!

    How the clouds pass silently overhead!
    How the earth darts on and on! and how the sun, moon, stars, dart on and on!
    How the water sports and sings! (surely it is alive!)
    How the trees rise and stand up, with strong trunks, with branches and leaves!
    (Surely there is something more in each of the trees, some living soul.)


I say Nature continues, glory continues,
I praise with electric voice,
For I do not see one imperfection in the universe.
  • O amazement of things — even the least particle!
    O spirituality of things!


  • I too carol the sun, usher'd or at noon, or as now, setting,
    I too throb to the brain and beauty of the earth and of all the growths of the earth,
    I too have felt the resistless call of myself.


  • As I roam'd the streets of inland Chicago, whatever streets I have roam'd,
    Or cities or silent woods, or even amid the sights of war,
    Wherever I have been I have charged myself with contentment and triumph.


  • I say Nature continues, glory continues,
    I praise with electric voice,
    For I do not see one imperfection in the universe,
    And I do not see one cause or result lamentable at last in the universe.


  • O setting sun! though the time has come,
    I still warble under you, if none else does, unmitigated adoration.

So Long!Edit

I announce the Union more and more compact, indissoluble, I announce splendors and majesties to make all the previous politics of the earth insignificant.


  • To conclude, I announce what comes after me.


  • When America does what was promis'd,
    When through these States walk a hundred millions of superb persons,
    When the rest part away for superb persons and contribute to them,
    When breeds of the most perfect mothers denote America,
    Then to me and mine our due fruition.


  • I have sung the body and the soul, war and peace have I sung, and the songs of life and death,
    And the songs of birth, and shown that there are many births.


  • I have offer'd my style to every one, I have journey'd with confident step;
    While my pleasure is yet at the full I whisper So long!
    And take the young woman's hand and the young man's hand for the last time.


  • I announce natural persons to arise,
    I announce justice triumphant,
    I announce uncompromising liberty and equality,
    I announce the justification of candor and the justification of pride.


  • I announce the Union more and more compact, indissoluble,
    I announce splendors and majesties to make all the previous politics of the earth insignificant.


I announce the great individual, fluid as Nature, chaste, affectionate, compassionate, fully arm'd.
  • I announce the great individual, fluid as Nature, chaste, affectionate, compassionate, fully arm'd.


  • I foresee too much, it means more than I thought,
    It appears to me I am dying.


  • Myself unknowing, my commission obeying, to question it never daring,
    To ages and ages yet the growth of the seed leaving,
    To troops out of the war arising, they the tasks I have set promulging,
    To women certain whispers of myself bequeathing, their affection me more clearly explaining,
    To young men my problems offering — no dallier I — I the muscle of their brains trying,
    So I pass, a little time vocal, visible, contrary,
    Afterward a melodious echo, passionately bent for, (death making me really undying,)
    The best of me then when no longer visible, for toward that I have been incessantly preparing.


  • My songs cease, I abandon them,
    From behind the screen where I hid I advance personally solely to you.
    Camerado, this is no book,
    Who touches this touches a man
    ,
    (Is it night? are we here together alone?)
    It is I you hold and who holds you,
    I spring from the pages into your arms — decease calls me forth.


  • I feel like one who has done work for the day to retire awhile,
    I receive now again of my many translations, from my avataras ascending, while others doubtless await me,
    An unknown sphere more real than I dream'd, more direct, darts awakening rays about me, So long!
    Remember my words, I may again return,
    I love you, I depart from materials,
    I am as one disembodied, triumphant, dead.

FIRST ANNEX: SANDS AT SEVENTYEdit

Brave, brave were the soldiers (high named to-day) who lived through the fight;
But the bravest press'd to the front and fell, unnamed, unknown.


  • My city's fit and noble name resumed,
    Choice aboriginal name, with marvellous beauty, meaning,
    A rocky founded island — shores where ever gayly dash the coming, going, hurrying sea waves.
    • Mannahatta


  • The tossing waves, the foam, the ships in the distance,
    The wild unrest, the snowy, curling caps — that inbound urge and urge of waves,
    Seeking the shores forever.
    • From Montauk Point


  • To those who've fail'd, in aspiration vast,
    To unnam'd soldiers fallen in front on the lead,
    To calm, devoted engineers — to over-ardent travelers — to pilots on their ships,
    To many a lofty song and picture without recognition — I'd rear laurel-cover'd monument,
    High, high above the rest — To all cut off before their time,
    Possess'd by some strange spirit of fire,
    Quench'd by an early death.
    • To Those Who've Fail'd


  • Brave, brave were the soldiers (high named to-day) who lived through the fight;
    But the bravest press'd to the front and fell, unnamed, unknown.
    • The Bravest Soldiers


As the days take on a mellower light, and the apple at last hangs really finish'd and indolent-ripe on the tree, then for the teeming quietest, happiest days of all! The brooding and blissful halcyon days!
  • As the days take on a mellower light, and the apple at last hangs really finish'd and indolent-ripe on the tree,
    Then for the teeming quietest, happiest days of all!
    The brooding and blissful halcyon days!
    • Halcyon Days


  • Nothing is ever really lost, or can be lost,
    No birth, identity, form — no object of the world.

    Nor life, nor force, nor any visible thing;
    Appearance must not foil, nor shifted sphere confuse thy brain.
    Ample are time and space — ample the fields of Nature.
    • Continuities


  • Ever the undiscouraged, resolute, struggling soul of man;
    (Have former armies fail'd? then we send fresh armies — and fresh again;)
    • Life


  • Small the theme of my Chant, yet the greatest — namely, One's-Self —
    a simple, separate person. That, for the use of the New World, I sing.
    • Small the Theme of My Chant


I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain...
  • That coursing on, whate'er men's speculations,
    Amid the changing schools, theologies, philosophies,
    Amid the bawling presentations new and old,
    The round earth's silent vital laws, facts, modes continue.
    • The Calming Thought of All


  • I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain,
    Eternal I rise impalpable out of the land and the bottomless sea,
    Upward to heaven, whence, vaguely form'd, altogether changed, and yet the same,
    I descend to lave the drouths, atomies, dust-layers of the globe,
    And all that in them without me were seeds only, latent, unborn;
    And forever, by day and night, I give back life to my own origin, and make pure and beautify it;
    (For song, issuing from its birth-place, after fulfilment, wandering,
    Reck'd or unreck'd, duly with love returns.)
    • The Voice of the Rain


  • Have you learn'd lessons only of those who admired you, and were tender with you, and stood aside for you?
    Have you not learn'd great lessons from those who reject you, and brace themselves against you? or who treat you with contempt, or dispute the passage with you?
    • Stronger Lessons


SECOND ANNEX; GOOD-BYE MY FANCYEdit

Sometimes how strange and clear to the soul,
That all these solid things are indeed but apparitions, concepts, non-realities.


  • Good-bye my fancy — (I had a word to say,
    But 'tis not quite the time — The best of any man's word or say,
    Is when its proper place arrives — and for its meaning,
    I keep mine till the last.)
    • Good-Bye My Fancy


  • A vague mist hanging 'round half the pages:
    (Sometimes how strange and clear to the soul,
    That all these solid things are indeed but apparitions, concepts, non-realities.)
    • Apparitions


In every object, mountain, tree, and star — in every birth and life, As part of each — evolv'd from each... A mystic cipher waits infolded.
  • In every object, mountain, tree, and star — in every birth and life,
    As part of each — evolv'd from each — meaning, behind the ostent,
    A mystic cipher waits infolded.
    • Shakspere-Bacon's Cipher


  • After a long, long course, hundreds of years, denials,
    Accumulations, rous'd love and joy and thought,
    Hopes, wishes, aspirations, ponderings, victories, myriads of readers,
    Coating, compassing, covering — after ages' and ages' encrustations,
    Then only may these songs reach fruition.
    • Long, Long Hence


  • When the full-grown poet came,
    Out spake pleased Nature (the round impassive globe, with all its shows of day and night,) saying, He is mine;
    But out spake too the Soul of man, proud, jealous and unreconciled,
    Nay he is mine alone;
    Then the full-grown poet stood between the two, and took each by the hand;
    And to-day and ever so stands, as blender, uniter, tightly holding hands,
    Which he will never release until he reconciles the two,
    And wholly and joyously blends them.
    • When the Full-Grown Poet Came


A Voice from DeathEdit

Although I come and unannounc'd, in horror and in pang, in pouring flood and fire, and wholesale elemental crash, (this voice so solemn, strange,) I too a minister of Deity.
  • A voice from Death, solemn and strange, in all his sweep and power,
    With sudden, indescribable blow — towns drown'd — humanity by thousands slain,
    The vaunted work of thrift, goods, dwellings, forge, street, iron bridge,
    Dash'd pell-mell by the blow — yet usher'd life continuing on,
    (Amid the rest, amid the rushing, whirling, wild debris,
    A suffering woman saved — a baby safely born!)


  • Although I come and unannounc'd, in horror and in pang,
    In pouring flood and fire, and wholesale elemental crash, (this voice so solemn, strange,)
    I too a minister of Deity.


Thou! thou! the vital, universal, giant force resistless, sleepless, calm, holding Humanity as in thy open hand, as some ephemeral toy, how ill to e'er forget thee!
  • E'en as I chant, lo! out of death, and out of ooze and slime,
    The blossoms rapidly blooming, sympathy, help, love,
    From West and East, from South and North and over sea,
    Its hot-spurr'd hearts and hands humanity to human aid moves on;
    And from within a thought and lesson yet.


  • Thou ever-darting Globe! through Space and Air!
    Thou waters that encompass us!
    Thou that in all the life and death of us, in action or in sleep!
    Thou laws invisible that permeate them and all,
    Thou that in all, and over all, and through and under all, incessant!
    Thou! thou! the vital, universal, giant force resistless, sleepless, calm,
    Holding Humanity as in thy open hand, as some ephemeral toy,
    How ill to e'er forget thee!


  • For I too have forgotten,
    (Wrapt in these little potencies of progress, politics, culture, wealth, inventions, civilization,)
    Have lost my recognition of your silent ever-swaying power, ye mighty, elemental throes,
    In which and upon which we float, and every one of us is buoy'd.


A Persian LessonEdit

Allah is all, all,all — immanent in every life and object, may-be at many and many-a-more removes — yet Allah, Allah, Allah is there...


  • "Finally my children, to envelop each word, each part of the rest,
    Allah is all, all,all — immanent in every life and object,
    May-be at many and many-a-more removes — yet Allah, Allah, Allah is there."


  • "Would you sound below the restless ocean of the entire world?
    Would you know the dissatisfaction? the urge and spur of every life;
    The something never still'd — never entirely gone? the invisible need of every seed?
    "It is the central urge in every atom,
    (Often unconscious, often evil, downfallen,)
    To return to its divine source and origin, however distant,
    Latent the same in subject and in object, without one exception."

L. of G.'s PurportEdit

Not to exclude or demarcate, or pick out evils from their formidable masses (even to expose them,) but add, fuse, complete, extend — and celebrate the immortal and the good.


  • Not to exclude or demarcate, or pick out evils from their formidable masses (even to expose them,)
    But add, fuse, complete, extend — and celebrate the immortal and the good.

    Haughty this song, its words and scope,
    To span vast realms of space and time,
    Evolution — the cumulative — growths and generations.
    Begun in ripen'd youth and steadily pursued,
    Wandering, peering, dallying with all — war, peace, day and night absorbing,
    Never even for one brief hour abandoning my task,
    I end it here in sickness, poverty, and old age.


  • I sing of life, yet mind me well of death...


The Unexpress'dEdit

After the countless songs, or long or short, all tongues, all lands, still something not yet told in poesy's voice or print — something lacking, (Who knows? the best yet unexpress'd and lacking.)


  • After the cycles, poems, singers, plays,
    Vaunted Ionia's, India's — Homer, Shakspere — the long, long times' thick dotted roads, areas,
    The shining clusters and the Milky Ways of stars — Nature's pulses reap'd,
    All retrospective passions, heroes, war, love, adoration,
    All ages' plummets dropt to their utmost depths,
    All human lives, throats, wishes, brains — all experiences' utterance;
    After the countless songs, or long or short, all tongues, all lands,
    Still something not yet told in poesy's voice or print — something lacking,
    (Who knows? the best yet unexpress'd and lacking.)


Grand Is the SeenEdit

Grand is the seen, the light, to me — grand are the sky and stars, Grand is the earth, and grand are lasting time and space, And grand their laws... But grander far the unseen soul of me...


  • Grand is the seen, the light, to me — grand are the sky and stars,
    Grand is the earth, and grand are lasting time and space,
    And grand their laws, so multiform, puzzling, evolutionary;
    But grander far the unseen soul of me, comprehending, endowing all those,
    Lighting the light, the sky and stars, delving the earth, sailing the sea,
    (What were all those, indeed, without thee, unseen soul? of what amount without thee?)
    More evolutionary, vast, puzzling, O my soul!
    More multiform far — more lasting thou than they.


Unseen BudsEdit

Unseen buds, infinite, hidden well, under the snow and ice, under the darkness, in every square or cubic inch, germinal, exquisite, in delicate lace, microscopic, unborn, like babes in wombs, latent, folded, compact, sleeping; Billions of billions, and trillions of trillions of them waiting...


  • Unseen buds, infinite, hidden well,
    Under the snow and ice, under the darkness, in every square or cubic inch,
    Germinal, exquisite, in delicate lace, microscopic, unborn,
    Like babes in wombs, latent, folded, compact, sleeping;
    Billions of billions, and trillions of trillions of them waiting,
    (On earth and in the sea — the universe — the stars there in the heavens,)
    Urging slowly, surely forward, forming endless,
    And waiting ever more, forever more behind.


Good-Bye My Fancy!Edit

Good-bye — and hail! my Fancy.
  • Good-bye my Fancy!
    Farewell dear mate, dear love!
    I'm going away, I know not where,
    Or to what fortune, or whether I may ever see you again,
    So Good-bye my Fancy.


  • Yet let me not be too hasty,
    Long indeed have we lived, slept, filter'd, become really blended into one;
    Then if we die we die together, (yes, we'll remain one,)
    If we go anywhere we'll go together to meet what happens,
    May-be we'll be better off and blither, and learn something,
    May-be it is yourself now really ushering me to the true songs, (who knows?)
    May-be it is you the mortal knob really undoing, turning — so now finally,
    Good-bye — and hail! my Fancy.


Quotes about Leaves of GrassEdit

I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of "LEAVES OF GRASS." I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of "LEAVES OF GRASS." I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed. I am very happy in reading it, as great power makes us happy. It meets the demand I am always making of what seemed the sterile and stingy nature, as if too much handiwork, or too much lymph in the temperament, were making our western wits fat and mean.
    I give you joy of your free and brave thought. I have great joy in it. I find incomparable things said incomparably well, as they must be. I find the courage of treatment which so delights us, and which large perception only can inspire.
    I greet you at the beginning of a great career, which yet must have had a long foreground somewhere, for such a start. I rubbed my eyes a little, to see if this sunbeam were no illusion; but the solid sense of the book is a sober certainty. It has the best merits, namely, of fortifying and encouraging…
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson, in a letter to Whitman, thanking him for a copy of Leaves of Grass (21 July 1855).

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A note on the editions usedEdit

When dates are provided for poems they are the dates when they first appeared, followed by the date of final revision. The final revision has been used for the main text, and on a few fragments earlier versions have also been provided. Selections were made from each of the 14 major sections of the final edition, with some of the major poems having their own sub-section. Many different publications of Whitman's poetry, and other sources of information were used in creating this article, the most helpful being those of Project Gutenberg for the base e-text, and the Library of America volume Walt Whitman: Complete Poetry and Collected Prose (1982) edited by Justin Kaplan for most comparison and emendation.