Devil

He is as ready as he can wish...to devise as many ways as can be to deface and obscure God's glory.

The Devil is the name given to a supernatural entity, who, in many Western religions, is the primary embodiment of evil. See also Satan.

QuotesEdit

In the most deeply significant of the legends concerning Jesus, we are told how the devil took him up into a high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of timeUpton Sinclair
  • He complained in no way of the evil reputation under which he lived, indeed, all over the world, and he assured me that he himself was of all living beings the most interested in the destruction of Superstition, and he avowed to me that he had been afraid, relatively as to his proper power, once only, and that was on the day when he had heard a preacher, more subtle than the rest of the human herd, cry in his pulpit: "My dear brethren, do not ever forget, when you hear the progress of lights praised, that the loveliest trick of the Devil is to persuade you that he does not exist!"
  • The devil, you see, is that friend who never stays with us to the end.
    • Georges Bernanos, Monsieur Ouine (1943), translated by William S. Bush. Lincoln NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2000, p. 171
  • William Roper: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law!
    Sir Thomas More: Yes! What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil?
    William Roper: Yes, I'd cut down every law in England to do that!
    Sir Thomas More: Oh? And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned 'round on you, where would you hide, Roper, the laws all being flat? This country is planted thick with laws, from coast to coast, Man's laws, not God's! And if you cut them down, and you're just the man to do it, do you really think you could stand upright in the winds that would blow then? Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
    • Robert Bolt, A Man for All Seasons (1967), act I, p. 39.
  • Every man for himself, his own ends, the devil for all.
    • Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), Part III, Section I. Memb, III
  • The Devil himself, which is the author of confusion and lies.
    • Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), Part III, Section IV. Memb. I. Subsection III
  • And bid the devil take the hin'most.
    • Samuel Butler, Hudibras, Part I (1663-64), Canto II, line 633. Burns, To a Haggis. John Fletcher, The Tragedy of Bouduca, Act IV, scene 2
  • Nick Machiavel had ne'er a trick
    (Though he gave his name to our Old Nick).
  • Here is the devil-and-all to pay.
  • Wherever God erects a house of prayer,
    The Devil always builds a chapel there:
    And 'twill be found, upon examination,
    The latter has the largest congregation.
  • One is always wrong to open a conversation with the devil, for, however he goes about it, he always insists on having the last word.
    • André Gide, 1917, in Journals 1889–1949, translated by Justin O'Brien
  • Why should the devil have all the good tunes?
    • Rowland Hill, sermon, reported in Edward W. Broome, The Rev. Rowland Hill: Preacher and Wit (1881), p. 93, in the sentence: "He did not see any reason why the devil should have all rhe good tunes"
  • The Devil is an ass, I do acknowledge it.
    • Ben Jonson, The Devil Is an Ass (performed 1616; published 1631), Act IV, scene 1
  • It is stupid of modern civilization to have given up believing in the devil, when he is the only explanation of it.
  • Der Teufel ist ein Optimist, wenn er glaubt, daß er die Menschen schlechter machen kann.
    • The devil is an optimist if he thinks he can make people worse than they are.
    • Karl Kraus, Die Fackel, no. 277/78 (March 31, 1909), translated in Thomas Szasz, Anti-Freud: Karl Kraus's Criticism of Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry (1970), Chapter 8
  • And now I would ask a strange question: who is the most diligentest bishop and prelate in all England that passeth all the rest in doing his office? I can tell for I know him who it is; I know him well. But now I think I see you listening and hearkening that I should name him. There is one that passeth all the other, and is the most diligent prelate and preacher in all England. And will ye know who it is? I will tell you: it is the devil. He is the most diligent preacher of all other; he is never out of his diocese; he is never from his cure; ye shall never find him unoccupied; he is ever in his parish; he keepeth residence at all times; ye shall never find him out of the way, call for him when you will he is ever at home; the diligentest preacher in all the realm; he is ever at his plough; no lording nor loitering can hinder him; he is ever applying his business, ye shall never find him idle, I warrant you. And his office is to hinder religion, to maintain superstition, to set up idolatry, to teach all kind of popery. He is ready as he can be wished for to set forth his plough; to devise as many ways as can be to deface and obscure God's glory...O that our prelates would be as diligent to sow the corn of good doctrine as Satan is to sow cockle and darnel.
    • Hugh Latimer, "Sermon on the Plough'", 29 January 1548. (G. E. Corrie (ed.), Sermons by Hugh Latimer, sometime Bishop of Worcester, Martyr, 1555 (Cambridge University Press, 1844), pp. 70-1)
  • It is Lucifer,
    The son of mystery;
    And since God suffers him to be,
    He, too, is God's minister,
    And labors for some good
    By us not understood.
  • Tell your master that if there were as many devils at Worms as tiles on its roofs, I would enter.
    • Martin Luther (April 16, 1521). See Bunsen's Life of Luther, p. 61
  • Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil.
    And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred.
    And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread.
  • The infernal serpent; he it was whose guile,
    Stirr'd up with envy and revenge, deceived
    The mother of mankind.
  • His form had yet not lost
    All his original brightness, nor appear'd
    Less than arch-angel ruined, and th' excess
    Of glory obscured.
  • From morn
    To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve,
    A summer's day; and with the setting sun
    Dropt from the zenith like a falling star.
  • Black it stood as night,
    Fierce as ten furies, terrible as hell,
    And shook a dreadful dart; what seem'd his head
    The likeness of a kingly crown had on.
    Satan was now at hand.
  • Incens'd with indignation Satan stood
    Unterrified, and like a comet burn'd
    ,
    That fires the length of Ophiucus huge
    In th' arctic sky, and from his horrid hair
    Shakes pestilence and war.
  • Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary, the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour.
  • When there is question of saving souls, or preventing greater harm to souls, We feel the courage to treat with the devil in person.
    • Pope Pius XI, speech to the students of the Mondragone college (May 14, 1929); reported as unverified but recounted in Robert A. Graham, Vatican Diplomacy (1959), p. 351.
  • I charge thee, Satan, hous'd within this man,
    To yield possession to my holy prayers,
    And to thy state of darkness hie thee straight;
    I conjure thee by all the saints in heaven!
  • Nay, then, let the devil wear black, for I'll have a suit of sables.
  • In the most deeply significant of the legends concerning Jesus, we are told how the devil took him up into a high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time; and the devil said unto him: "All this power will I give unto thee, and the glory of them, for that is delivered unto me, and to whomsoever I will, I give it. If thou, therefore, wilt worship me, all shall be thine." Jesus, as we know, answered and said "Get thee behind me, Satan!" And he really meant it; he would have nothing to do with worldly glory, with "temporal power;" he chose the career of a revolutionary agitator, and died the death of a disturber of the peace. And for two or three centuries his church followed in his footsteps, cherishing his proletarian gospel. The early Christians had "all things in common, except women;" they lived as social outcasts, hiding in deserted catacombs, and being thrown to lions and boiled in oil.
    But the devil is a subtle worm; he does not give up at one defeat, for he knows human nature, and the strength of the forces which battle for him. He failed to get Jesus, but he came again, to get Jesus' church. He came when, through the power of the new revolutionary idea, the Church had won a position of tremendous power in the decaying Roman Empire; and the subtle worm assumed the guise of no less a person than the Emperor himself, suggesting that he should become a convert to the new faith, so that the Church and he might work together for the greater glory of God. The bishops and fathers of the Church, ambitious for their organization, fell for this scheme, and Satan went off laughing to himself. He had got everything he had asked from Jesus three hundred years before; he had got the world's greatest religion.
    • Upton Sinclair, in The Profits of Religion : An Essay in Economic Interpretation (1918), Book Seven : The Church of the Social Revolution, "Christ and Caesar".
  • Without Satan, with God only, how poor a universe, how trite a music!
  • We may not pay Satan reverence, for that would be indiscreet, but we can at least respect his talents.
    • Mark Twain, "Concerning the Jews", Harper's Magazine (September 1899)
  • A person [Satan] who has during all time maintained the imposing position of spiritual head of four-fifths of the human race, and political head of the whole of it, must be granted the possession of executive abilities of the loftiest order.
    • Mark Twain, "Concerning the Jews", Harper's Magazine (September 1899)
  • Don't you know there ain't no devil, there's just God when he's drunk.
    • Tom Waits "Heartattack and Vine", Heartattack and Vine (1980)
  • Wow! I like that, see? Because that's the way the devil does it. Everytime you make an error, everytime you make a mistake and I mean it's nothing but a mistake; the first thing he says is 'if you are what you say you are', 'If you are a preacher', 'If you were a Christian'. That's the devil, everytime you hear it from somebody. Did you hear what I said? Everytime you hear somebody make a suggestion like that, remember that's not them, that's the devil! And I don't want to go too much further without telling you this: Before the devil even opens his mouth you ought already know who you are. It won't shake you, it won't bother you, because you already know who you are!"

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical QuotationsEdit

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 192-93.
  • Renounce the Devil and all his works.
    • Book of Common Prayer, Baptism of Infants
  • Therefore it behooveth hire a full long spoon
    That shal ete with a feend.
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, The Squire's Tale, line 602. Same idea in George Meriton, Praise of Yorkshire Ale. Dekker, Batchelars' Banquet, Works, I. 170. (Grosart's ed). Heywood, Proverbs, Part II, Chapter V. Kemp, Nine Days Wonder (1600). Marlowe, Jew of Malta, III, IV. Comedy of Errors, IV, III. 64. Tempest, II. 2
  • Auch die Kultur, die alle Welt beleckt,
    Hat auf den Teufel sich erstreckt.
  • Nein, nein! Der Teufel ist ein Egoist
    Und thut nicht leicht um Gottes Willen,
    Was einem Andern nützlich ist.
    • No, no! The devil is an egotist,
      And is not apt, without why or wherefore,
      "For God's sake," others to assist.
    • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, I. 4. 124
  • I call'd the devil, and he came,
    And with wonder his form did I closely scan;
    He is not ugly, and is not lame,
    But really a handsome and charming man.
    A man in the prime of life is the devil,
    Obliging, a man of the world, and civil;
    A diplomatist too, well skill'd in debate,
    He talks quite glibly of church and state.
  • When the devil drives, needs must. (Needs must when the devil drives.)
    • John Heywood, Johan the Husband. Proverbs, Chapter VII. Cervantes, Don Quixote, Part I, Book IV, Chapter 4. Gosson, Ephemerides of Phialo. Marlowe, Dr. Faustus. Peele, Edward I. William Shakespeare, All's Well that Ends Well, I. 3
  • How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning!
    • Isaiah, XIV. 12
  • What is got over the devil's back is spent under his belly.
  • Resist the Devil, and he will flee from you.
    • James, IV. 7
  • The king of terrors.
    • Job, XVIII. 14
  • The devil, my friends, is a woman just now.
    'Tis a woman that reigns in Hell.
  • Swings the scaly horror of his folded tail.
  • Bid the Devil take the slowest.
  • Verflucht wer mit dem Teufel spielt.
  • From his brimstone bed, at break of day,
    A-walking the Devil is gone,
    To look at his little snug farm of the world,
    And see how his stock went on.
    • Robert Southey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Devil's Walk, Stanza 1. Title originally Devils' Thoughts. Coleridge assigns to Southey the first four stanzas. See his Sibylline Leaves. (1817), p. 98. Claim of Porson a hoax.
  • The Satanic school.

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Last modified on 12 April 2014, at 15:46