Fruit

Fruit, in broad terms, is a structure of a plant that contains its seeds. In non-technical usage, such as food preparation, fruit normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of certain plants that are sweet and edible in the raw state, such as apples, oranges, grapes, strawberries, juniper berries and bananas.

SourcedEdit

  • My living in Yorkshire was so far out of the way, that it was actually twelve miles from a lemon.
    • Sydney Smith, Lady Holland's Memoir, Vol. I. P. 262, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 437.

GenerallyEdit

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)Edit

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 303-04.

  • The kindly fruits of the earth.
    • Book of Common Prayer, Litany.
  • Nothing great is produced suddenly, since not even the grape or the fig is. If you say to me now that you want a fig, I will answer to you that it requires time: let it flower first, then put forth fruit, and then ripen.
    • Epictetus, Discourses, What Philosophy Promises, Chapter XV. Geo. Long's translation.
  • Eve, with her basket, was
    Deep in the bells and grass
    Wading in bells and grass
    Up to her knees,
    Picking a dish of sweet
    Berries and plums to eat,
    Down in the bells and grass
    Under the trees.
  • Ye shall know them by their fruits.
    Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?
    • Matthew. VII. 16; 20.
  • Each tree
    Laden with fairest fruit, that hung to th' eye
    Tempting, stirr'd in me sudden appetite
    To pluck and eat.
  • Thus do I live, from pleasure quite debarred,
    Nor taste the fruits that the sun's genial rays
    Mature, john-apple, nor the downy peach.
  • The strawberry grows underneath the nettle
    And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
    Neighbour'd by fruit of baser quality.
  • The barberry and currant must escape
    Though her small clusters imitate the grape.
  • Let other lands, exulting, glean
    The apple from the pine,
    The orange from its glossy green,
    The cluster from the vine.

Specific typesEdit

PeachEdit

  • A little peach in an orchard grew,—
    A little peach of emerald hue;
    Warmed by the sun and wet by the dew
    It grew.
    • Eugene Field, The Little Peach; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • As touching peaches in general, the very name in Latine whereby they are called Persica, doth evidently show that they were brought out of Persia first.
    • Pliny the Elder, Natural History, Book XV, Chapter 13. Holland's translation; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • The ripest peach is highest on the tree.
    • James Whitcomb Riley, The Ripest Peach; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.

PearEdit

  • "Now, Sire," quod she, "for aught that may bityde,
    I moste haue of the peres that I see,
    Or I moote dye, so soore longeth me
    To eten of the smalle peres grene."
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, The Merchantes Tale, line 14,669; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • The great white pear-tree dropped with dew from leaves
    And blossom, under heavens of happy blue.
    • Jean Ingelow, Songs with Preludes, Wedlock; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 591.
  • A pear-tree planted nigh:
    'Twas charg'd with fruit that made a goodly show,
    And hung with dangling pears was every bough.
    • Alexander Pope, January and May, line 602; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 592.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 13 April 2014, at 02:27