Transgender

person whose gender identity is different from the gender they were assigned at birth

Transgender people have a gender identity or gender expression that differs from their sex assigned at birth.

QuotesEdit

  • Young kids are missing days of school, not going to school because they feel unsafe. Now. They’re restricting their intake of food and drink so that they don’t have to go to the bathroom. They’re suffering from bladder and urinary tract infections because they refuse to go to the bathroom, ‘cause they don’t feel safe or comfortable. That’s happening now.
  • I got to say in many ways, I really wish the trans community was as big as members of this committee seem to think that we are. [...] The reality, though, is that we aren’t powerful enough to disrupt the culture of this country. Many of us, even though we are incredibly resilient, are just trying to get through the day, really. We aren’t the threat you imagine us to be.
  • I see the rates of suicidality in my community, and the violence. I see the rejection and the turmoil. I hear the stories of people who have ended their own lives. Young people who would prefer not to be alive than to live in a world that tells them that there’s something wrong with them. That we’re disordered, that we’re a problem, that we’re a challenge to deal with, that we’re something to legislate against.
  • Many young people today believe (and are being taught) that they can elect their sex like they choose an item of clothing, and go through with ‘surgery’ that will wholly transform them. Often the result leads to disappointment, and there are many stories of regret, and of (too late) reticence just before committing to the operation. These stories are unfashionable to the ears of gender-theory enthusiasts, who wish to forever believe that sex is a fluid and insubstantial thing, and can be easily changed.
  • It is difficult to generate a counterdiscourse if one is programmed to disappear. The highest purpose of the [medically defined] transsexual is to erase h/erself, to fade into the "normal" population as soon as possible. Part of this process is known as constructing a plausible history--learning to lie effectively about one's past. What is gained is acceptability in society. ... In the transsexual's erased history we can find a story disruptive to the accepted discourses of gender.
    • Sandy Stone, “The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto,” in Body Politics: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity, edited by Julia Epstein and Kristina Straub (1991), pp. 280–304.
  • To attempt to occupy a place as speaking subject within the traditional gender frame is to become complicit in the discourse which one wishes to deconstruct.
    • Sandy Stone, “The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto,” in Body Politics: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity, edited by Julia Epstein and Kristina Straub (1991), pp. 280–304.
  • Transsexuals for whom gender identity is something different from and perhaps irrelevant to physical genitalia are occulted by those for whom the power of the medical/psychological establishments, and their ability to act as gatekeepers for cultural norms, is the final authority for what counts as a culturally intelligible body.
    • Sandy Stone, “The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto,” in Body Politics: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity, edited by Julia Epstein and Kristina Straub (1991), pp. 280–304.
  • I feel like trans culture is just so obsessed with reassuring ourselves that we’re valid, that we sometimes forget that the end goal of a political movement is not validity, it’s equality.

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