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Sin (mythology)

god of the moon in Mesopotamian mythology
Original 1915 caption: "Worship of the Moon God. Cylinder-seal of Khashkhamer, patesi of Ishkun-Sin (in North Babylonia), and vassal of Ur-Engur, king of Ur (c. 2400 BCE) (British Museum). Photo: Mansell".
Your greatness covers all countries. Your fearsome radiance overwhelms the holy sky.
You brighten the night sky in the broad firmament, and illuminate the darkness. The Anuna gods stand by with prayers and supplications at your rising. The sweet sight of your resplendent crescent, full of loveliness, brings joy to the great lady of the Ki-ur, mother Ninli. ~ Ishme-Dagan

Sīn (/ˈsiːn/) or Suen (Akkadian: 𒂗𒍪 EN.ZU, pronounced Su'en, Sîn) or Nanna (Sumerian: 𒀭𒋀𒆠 DŠEŠ.KI, DNANNA) was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian religions of Sumer, Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. Sin was the patron deity of Ur.

Quotes about SīnEdit

  • Say to Nanna, the firstborn son of Enlil, who loves prayers; repeat to the lord whose light spreads widely, the crown of heaven and earth, the great lord who loves to revive man; the father of the black-headed; the merciful king, who can untie and release; the merciful, compassionate god who listens to appeals:
    You, who are perfect in lordship and wear the legitimate headdress, the one with gleaming appearance and noble countenance, holy form endowed lavishly with beauty: your greatness covers all countries. Your fearsome radiance overwhelms the holy sky. [...] You are indeed glorious from east to west. [...] You are the king of heaven and earth; it is you who decide their fate.

See alsoEdit

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