Radio

technology of using radio waves to carry information
From morning till night, in the midst of our work as in our recreation, we live constantly in an atmosphere of intellectual shoddiness. Every popular prejudice and vulgar conceit is played upon and pandered to in the interests of salesmanship. ~ Everett Dean Martin
For the words of the profits were written on the studio wall. ~ Rush

Radio is the wireless transmission of electromagnetic signals through the atmosphere or free space.

QuotesEdit

  • Listening to a foreign radio station is something that declines when local media become freer and provide what local people most want to hear. According to BBC audience research, in most cases the BBC achieved large audiences (20% and more) only where the choice of local services was limited to 5 or fewer stations. As choice grows, BBC audiences fall.
    • BBC, Audience research at the BBC World Service 1932-2010, Participation, Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, 2011, p. 95; as qtd in UNESCO, “Statistics on Radio”, (Feb 13, 2013).
  • First radio, then television, have assaulted and overturned the privacy of the home, the real American privacy, which permitted the development of a higher and more independent life within democratic society.
    • Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind (New York: 1988), p. 58
  • Radio has contributed to our ‘growing lack of attention.’ .?.?. This sort of hopscotching existence makes it almost impossible for people, myself included, to sit down and get into a novel again. We have become a short story reading people, or, worse than that, a QUICK reading people
  • The FCC, the Federal Communications Commission, decided all by itself that radio and television were the only two parts of American life not protected by the free speech provisions of the first amendment to the Constitution. I'd like to repeat that, because it sounds... vaguely important! The FCC—an appointed body, not elected, answerable only to the president—decided on its own that radio and television were the only two parts of American life not protected by the first amendment to the Constitution. Why did they decide that? Because they got a letter from a minister in Mississippi! A Reverend Donald Wildman in Mississippi heard something on the radio that he didn't like. Well, Reverend, did anyone ever tell you there are two KNOBS on the radio? Two. Knobs. On the radio. Of course, I'm sure the reverend isn't that comfortable with anything that has two knobs on it... But hey, reverend, there are two knobs on the radio! One of them turns the radio OFF, and the other one [slaps his head] CHANGES THE STATION! Imagine that, reverend, you can actually change the station! It's called freedom of choice, and it's one of the principles this country was founded upon. Look it up in the library, reverend, if you have any of them left when you've finished burning all the books.
  • In 11 countries surveyed across Africa, local commercial radio grew by an average of 360 percent between 2000 and 2006, whereas community radio grew by a striking 1,386 percent, on average, over the same period.
    • "The Growing Pains of Community Radio in Africa" (Peter da Costa), Glocal Times, The Communication for Development Journal, 2012, No 17/18, p.4; as qtd in UNESCO, “Statistics on Radio”, (Feb 13, 2013).
  • For many people in the future, radio will take the place of an inner life.
    • Georges Duhamel, In Defense of Letters (1937), E. Bozman, trans. (1939), p. 35
  • Beware of the radio if you want to improve your mind.
    • Georges Duhamel, In Defense of Letters (1937), E. Bozman, trans. (1939), p. 42
  • Books are the friends of solitude. They develop individuality and freedom. In solitary reading a man who is seeking himself has some chance of finding himself. … Radio, on the other hand, is now the chief agent of imperialism. It does not purify the spirit of man, does not, like the book, bring him back to the sanctuary of solitude, but throws him to the lions, subtly preparing his mind for the blood and chains of public sacrifice.
    • Georges Duhamel, In Defense of Letters (1937), E. Bozman, trans. (1939), p. 42
  • The Brazilian radio market is the second largest in the Americas, being one step behind the United States. According to data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) of 2009, radios are present in 88% of homes, 80% of cars in circulation, and in 36% of mobile telephones.
    • Carlos Eduardo Esch and Nélia del Bianco, Digital radio in Brazil: analysis of an unfinished debate, Radio evolution: conference proceedings, University of Minho, Communication and Society Research Centre, 2012, p. 142
  • It is impossible to understand the American public without taking into account the tremendous psychological effect of bringing up a generation of people in a daily environment of advertising. It is impossible to escape the advertising man; his sales talk assaults us in the morning newspaper, in the street car, with billboards along the highways, and in his shameless use of the radio. This means that from morning till night, in the midst of our work as in our recreation, we live constantly in an atmosphere of intellectual shoddiness. Every popular prejudice and vulgar conceit is played upon and pandered to in the interests of salesmanship. Everywhere material interests and herd opinion are strengthened to the loss of personal independence. The tendency is to think and speak for effect rather than out of one's inner life. There is a marked decline the ability to play with ideas, or to live the spiritual life for its own sake. Hence a decline in civilization of interest, humor and urbanity. Advertising tends to make mechanized barbarians of us all.
    • Everett Dean Martin, The Conflict of the Individual and the Mass in the Modern World (1932), pp. 29-30
  • All this, I said, just as today was the case with the beginnings of wireless, would be of no more service to man than as an escape from himself and his true aims, and a means of surrounding himself with an ever closer mesh of distractions and useless activities.
    • Herman Hesse, Steppenwolf, B. Creighton, trans., (New York: 1990), pp. 103-104
  • For the words of the profits were written on the studio wall
Concert hall
And echoes with the sound of salesmen.
  • Rush, "The Spirit of Radio"
  • Let the future tell the truth and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine.
    • Nikola Tesla, On patent controversies regarding the invention of Radio and other things, as quoted in "A Visit to Nikola Tesla" by Dragislav L. Petković in Politika (April 1927); as quoted in Tesla, Master of Lightning (1999) by Margaret Cheney, Robert Uth, and Jim Glenn, p. 73 ISBN 0760710058  ; also in Tesla: Man Out of Time (2001) by Margaret Cheney, p. 230 ISBN 0743215362 .
  • The total number of community radio stations in Latin America are around 10,000, with Peru having the largest proportion and Ecuador, Bolivia, and Brazil in second, third, and fourth place. If unlicensed stations are also taken into account, the overall numbers are much higher. Recent surveys by UNESCO, for example, show there are more than 10,000 community radio stations still waiting for licenses in Brazil alone.
    • "Voices from Villages: Community Radio in the Developing World". CIMA, 2011, p. 9; as qtd in UNESCO, “Statistics on Radio”, (Feb 13, 2013).
  • In Southeast Asia, Thailand tops the region’s charts with about 5,000 community stations–most of them operating without licenses. In populous Indonesia, community radio has also taken off rapidly, but the number of stations is in the hundreds rather than thousands. The Philippines counts more than 55 community radio stations independent of government and commercial interests operating outside the cities and using low powered transmitters.
    • "Voices from Villages: Community Radio in the Developing World". CIMA, 2011, p. 10; as qtd in UNESCO, “Statistics on Radio”, (Feb 13, 2013).

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

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