Mahābhārata

One of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India

The Mahābhārata is an Sanskrit epic poem written over an extended period from the 4th century BC to the 2nd century AD. The fullest form of The Mahābhārata contains about 2,000,000 words, and is sometimes said to be the longest poem in world literature. Quotations are cited from the translation by J. A. B. van Buitenen et al. (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1980–), to which page numbers also refer.

  • धर्मादर्थश्च कामश्च स किमर्थं न सेव्यते
    • From Righteousness is Wealth as also Pleasure. Why should not Righteousness, therefore, be courted?
      • 18.5.49; translation of Kisari Mohan Ganguli [1]

Sabha ParvaEdit

Vana ParvaEdit

  • With gentleness one defeats the gentle as well as the hard; there is nothing impossible to the gentle; therefore the gentle is the more severe.
    • Sub-parva 31, sect. 29; vol. 2, p. 277.
  • A gray head does not make an elder. The Gods know him to be an elder who knows, be he a child. Not by years, not by gray hairs, not by riches or many relations did the seers make the Law: "He is great to us who has learning."
    • Sub-parva 33, sect. 133; vol. 2, p. 476.
  • Be he ever so wise and strong, wealth confounds a man. In my view, anyone living in comfort fails to reason.
    • Sub-parva 36, sect. 178; vol. 2, p. 566.

Udyoga ParvaEdit

as translated by J. A. B. van Buitenen

  • The poor always eat better: hunger sweetens their dishes, and that is rare among the rich. It is generally found in the world that the rich have no appetite, but the poor, O Indra of kings, digest even wood.
    • Sub-parva 51, sect. 34; vol. 3, pp. 263-4.
  • The intoxication with power is worse than drunkenness with liquor and such, for he who is drunk with power does not come to his senses before he falls.
    • Sub-parva 51, sect. 34; vol. 3, p. 264.
  • People are plagued by their senses if they act without restraint to attain their desires. ... If one is dragged along as the victim of his natural five senses, his adversities wax like the moon in the bright fortnight.
    • 5(51)34:53, p. 264
  • A chariot, king, is a person's body:
    The soul is the driver, the senses his horses;
    Undistracted by his fine horses a driver
    Who is skilled rides happily, if they are trained.
    • 5(51)34:57, p. 264
  • Senses out of control suffice to bring one to grief, as untrained and disobedient horses bring a driver to grief on the road. A fool who, guided by his senses, sees profit arising from the unprofitable and the unprofitable from profit mistakes misery for happiness.
    • 5(51)34:58, p. 264
  • Once war has been undertaken, no peace is made by pretending there is no war.
    • Sub-parva 54, sect. 86; vol. 3, p. 365.

Contents

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