Louise of Orléans

French princess; Queen consort of the Belgians (1832-1850)

Louise of Orléans (3 April 1812 – 11 October 1850) was the first Queen of the Belgians as the second wife of Leopold I of Belgium. She rarely participated in public representation, but acted as the political adviser of her spouse. Her large correspondence is a valuable historical source of the period and has been published.

Louise of Orléans, first Queen of the Belgians

Quotes

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  • What more could I ask on earth than to be your friend, to be your only friend? All my happiness I owe to you all that is lacking from my happiness is my fault, alone, and I blame only myself for all that troubles me. If I am no longer young, if I have none of the gifts or graces that might have made your home a happy one, if I have been unable to bring any pleasure to your life, I must attribute it to my ill fortune. And so, if I cannot but regret, I only regret what I cannot do for you. It has been the thorn in my happiness that I could not help you; but alas, the feeling of all that is lacking in me, of all that has been wanting, and will always be wanting only increases my adoration and gratitude.

Quotes about Louise of Orléans

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  • I well knew your present King’s father and pious mother. I was often admitted to the friendly intimacy of the royal family, and I have held the little Leopold, Duke of Brabant, in my arms. I remember that good Christian, Queen Marie Louise, asking me to give my benediction to her eldest son, then eight or nine years old, so that he might become a good king.
    • Pope Leo XIII: His Life And Work, Julien De Narfon, 1923 As King Leopold I belonged to the Protestant religion, the influence acquired by Mgr. Pecci over his Majesty was all the more remarkable. As for Queen Marie Louise, who was a fervent Catholic, she admired the Prelate’s virtues still more than his diplomatic skill.

Quotes about Louise of Orléans

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