Hostility

form of emotionally charged angry behavior

Hostility is seen as form of emotionally charged angry behavior. In everyday speech it is more commonly used as a synonym for anger and aggression.

QuotesEdit

  • "He insulted me, hit me, beat me, robbed me" — for those who brood on this, hostility isn't stilled. "He insulted me, hit me, beat me, robbed me" — for those who don't brood on this, hostility is stilled. Hostilities aren't stilled through hostility, regardless. Hostilities are stilled through non-hostility: this, an unending truth.
    • Dhammapada, 1. Yammakavagga: "The Pairs" (Verses 3-5).
    • Translator: Thanissaro Bhikkhu
    • Alternative: "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me,"— in those who harbour such thoughts hatred will never cease. "He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me," — in those who do not harbour such thoughts hatred will cease. For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love, this is an old rule.
      • Translator: F. Max Müller.
  • If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we should find in each man's life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.
  • Acts of hostility shall be intended matters of force.
    • Sir Thomas Twisden, 1st Baronet, J., Errington v. Hirst (1665), Ray. (Sir Thos.) Rep. 125; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 100.

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