Challenge is a common English word that is used generically for many different named competitions and for things that are imbued with a sense of difficulty and victory.


  • If not, resolve, before we go,
    That you and I must pull a crow.
    Y' 'ad best (quoth Ralpho), as the Ancients
    Say wisely, have a care o' the main chance.
  • Never measure the height of a mountain, until you have reached the top. Then you will see how low it was.
  • only those who dare to fail greatly, can ever achieve greatly.
  • Parsons treated magic and rocketry as different sides of the same coin: both had been disparaged, both derided as impossible, but because of this both presented themselves as challenges to be conquered. Rocketry postulated that we should no longer see ourselves as creatures chained to the earth but as beings capable of exploring the universe.
Similarly, magic suggested there were unseen metaphysical worlds that existed and could be explored with the right knowledge. Both rocketry and magic were rebellions against the very limits of human existence; in striving for one challenge he could not help but strive for the other.
  • George Pendle, Pendle, George (2005). Strange Angel: The Otherworldly Life of Rocket Scientist John Whiteside Parsons. p. 18.
  • The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
    • Bertrand Russell, as quoted in Crainer's The Ultimate Book of Business Quotations (1997), p. 258.
  • I never in my life
    Did hear a challenge urg'd more modestly,
    Unless a brother should a brother dare
    To gentle exercise and proof of arms.
  • There I throw my gage,
    To prove it on thee to the extremest point
    Of mortal breathing.
  • An I thought he had been valiant and so cunning in fence, I'ld have seen him damned ere I'ld have challenged him.

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