Becket (1964 film)

1964 film by Peter Glenville

Becket is a 1964 film about the relationship between Thomas Becket and Henry II.

Directed by Peter Glenville. Written by Edward Anhalt, based on the play by Jean Anouilh.
A taste for wine and women made them friends. A sudden clash made them man and martyr… which led to murder!  (taglines)

DialogueEdit

King Henry II: Am I the strongest or am I not?
Thomas a Becket: You are today, but one must never drive one's enemy to despair; it makes him strong. Gentleness is better politics, it saps virility. A good occupational force must never crush. It must corrupt.

Brother Philip: Your Grace, there are armed men at the doors. I bolted the doors, but...
Thomas a Becket: It's time for Vespers. Does one bolt the doors during Vespers? I've never heard of it.
Brother Philip: But, your Grace...
Thomas a Becket: Open them. Everything must be as it should be for divine service.

TaglinesEdit

  • A taste for wine and women made them friends. A sudden clash made them man and martyr...which led to murder!
  • An age of rampant lusts, abandon, runaway passions. An age brought bristling to life by two of the most exciting stars of our time!

CastEdit

External linksEdit

Wikipedia has an article about:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: