Irish proverbs

Proverbs from all Irish speaking parts of the world.

AEdit

  • An cleas a bhíos ag an deaid, bíonn sé ag an mac.
    • Translation: The trick the father has, the son has.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

BEdit

  • Ba mhinic droch-éadach ar tháilliúr 's droch-bhróg ar ghréasaidh.
    • Translation: There was often a bad cloth on a tailor and a bad shoe on a cobbler.
    • English equivalent: The shoemaker goes barefoot.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Bíonn gach tosú lag.
    • Translation: Every beginning is weak.
    • Swedish equivalent: We all start out as children.
    • Wales. Board of Celtic Studies (1968). The bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies. University of Wales Press. 
  • Bíonn cluasa ar na clathacha.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Walls have ears.
    • Meaning: "What you say may be overheard; used as a warning."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 287. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 27 September 2013. 
    • Valone (2010). Ireland's Great Hunger: Relief, Representation, and Remembrance. University Press of America. p. 172. ISBN 0761848991. 

CEdit

  • Casar na daoiní ar a chéile, ach ní chastar na cnuic.
    • Translation: The people meet each other but the hills do not.
    • English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • Meaning: There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet. or Once can always find a possibility for revenge.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

IEdit

  • Is trian de'n obair tús a chur.
    • Translation: It is a third of the work to begin.
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

LEdit

  • Leig isteach ar chluas as amach ar cluas.
    • Translation: In at one ear and out at the other.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed is the least heeded.
    • Meaning: For various reasons a good advice or a genuine warning is often disregarded or considered of no importance.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Na h-éisg bheaga a bheathuigheas na h-éisg mhóra.
    • Translation: The little fish feed the big fish.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Na tabhair malairt de do chapall nuair ata tu ag dul trasna ar an abhainn.
    • Translation: Don't change your horse when you are about to cross a river.
    • Note: When in water it is arduous to mount and dismount.
    • English equivalent: Don't change horses in midstream.
    • Meaning: It is often wise not to quit an undertaking already begun.
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
    • O Muirgheasa, Enri (1997). "722". Seanfhocla Uladh. p. 188. 
  • "Ní bhíonn airgead amadáin i bhfad ina phóca."
    • Translation: A fool's money is not long in his pocket.
    • {{cite book | last1 = Oppenheimer | year = 2006 | title = The origins of the British: a genetic detective story : the surprising roots of the English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh | publisher = Carroll \& Graf | isbn=0786718900}
  • Ní gnáthach caonnach ar an gcloich bhíonn a' sior-chorruighe.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • Meaning: "There are a Set of People in the World of fo unfettled and reftleis a Temper, and such Admirers of Novelty, that they can never be long pleafed with one way of’ living, no more than to continue long in one Habitation; but before they are well enter’d upon one Bufinefs, dip into another, and before they are well fettled in one Habitation, remove to another; fo that they are always bufily beginning to live, but by reafon of Ficklenefs and Impatience, never arrive at a way of living: fuch Perfons fall under the Doom of this Proverb, which is delign’d to fix the Volatility of their Tempers, by laying before them the ill Confequences of fuch Ficklenefs and Inconltancy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Ní mar a shíltear a bhítear.
    • Translation: Things aren't as they seem.
    • Oppenheimer (2006). The origins of the British: a genetic detective story : the surprising roots of the English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh. Carroll \& Graf. ISBN 0786718900. 
  • Ní thagann ciall roimh aois.
    • Translation: Sense does not come before age.
    • English equivalent: Reason does not come before years.
    • Meaning: Older people having faced more adversity are more reasonable.
    • MacFarlane (2001). The Little Giant Encyclopedia of Proverbs. Sterling. p. 64. ISBN 0806974893. 
  • Ní thuigeann an seach an seang.
    • Translation:The well fed person doesn't understand the hungry one.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • Meaning: "Nobody can fully understand another person's hardship or suffering."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Oppenheimer (2006). The origins of the British: a genetic detective story : the surprising roots of the English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh. Carroll \& Graf. ISBN 0786718900. 
  • Níl aon bhean is gnáthiage drochbhróga uirthí ná bean an ghréasaidhe.
    • Translation: There is no woman more accustomed to bad shoes on her than the cobbler's wife.
    • English equivalent: The cobbler's wife is the worst shod.
    • Meaning: "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • "Níor bhris focal maith fiacail riamh."
    • Translation: "A good word never broke a tooth."
    • Meaning: It doesn't hurt to pay a compliment.
    • MacFarlane (2001). The Little Giant Encyclopedia of Proverbs. Sterling. p. 255. ISBN 0806974893. 

TEdit

  • Toradh an chrainn a thuitfeas an duilleabhar.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 18 February 2014, at 12:05