Last modified on 25 July 2014, at 11:42

Welsh proverbs

Proverbs from all Welsh speaking parts of the world.

AEdit

  • Adar o'r unlliw, ehedant i'r unlle.
    • English Equivalent: Birds of a feather flock together.
    • "It is a fact worthy of remark, that when a set of men agree in any particulars, though never so trivial, they flock together, and often establish themselves into a kind of fraternity for contriving and carrying into effect their plans. According to their distinct character they club together, factious with factious, wise with wise, indolent with indolent, active with active et cetera."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 41. 
    • Ceiniogwerth (1849). Y Geiniogwerth. Cy. p. 306. 
  • Adfyd a ddwg wybodaeth, a gwybodaeth ddoethineb.
    • English equivalent: Adversity is the mother of wisdom.
    • "Most of us seldom take the trouble to think. Crises and deadlocks when they occur have at least this advantage, that they force us to think."
    • Jawaharlal Nehru The Unity of India : Collected Writings, 1937-1940 (1942), p. 94
    • Roberts (1885). The proverbs of Wales: a collection of Welsh proverbs, with English Translations. T. R. Roberts. p. 6. 

CEdit

  • Carreg a dreigla, ni fwsoga.
    • English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • "There are a Set of People in the World who are such Admirers of Novelty, that they can never be long pleafed with one way of’ living, who before they are well fettled in one Habitation, remove to another."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Cyfaill cywir mewn ing y'i gwelir.
    • English equivalent: A friend is known in adversity, like gold is known in fire.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Bajban ismerszik meg a barát.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 159. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Cynt y cyferfydd dau ddyn na dau fynydd.
    • English equivalent: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • "There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet." or "One can always find a possibility for revenge."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

DEdit

FEdit

  • Fel y bo'r dyn y bydd ei lwdn.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • "Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Fel y fam fel y ferch.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

GEdit

  • Gwna dda dros ddrwg, uffern ni'th ddwg.
    • English equivalent: If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.
    • Roberts (1885). The proverbs of Wales: a collection of Welsh proverbs, with English Translations. T. R. Roberts. p. 114. 

IEdit

  • I mewn drwy un glust ac allan drwy'r llall.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed are the least heeded.
    • "For various reasons a good advice or a genuine warning is often disregarded or considered of no importance."
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

LEdit

MEdit

  • Mwyaf y brys, mwyaf y rhwystr.
    • English equivalent: Make haste slowly.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Hamar munka ritkán jó.
    • Meaning: "Progress with caution. Acting hastily one is likely to forget or overlook something important, which leads to grave errors or failure."
    • Roberts (1885). The proverbs of Wales: a collection of Welsh proverbs, with English Translations. T. R. Roberts. p. 70. 
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 241. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Ni all neb wasanaethu dau arglwydd.
    • English equivalent: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • "One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Nid aur yw popeth melyn.
    • English Equivalent: All that glisters is not gold.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Nem mind arany, ami fénylik.
    • "An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content."
    • Borsley, Tallerman, Willis (2007). The Syntax of Welsh. Cambridge University Press. p. 364. ISBN 0521836301. 
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 125. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Nid oes neb mor droednoeth â phlant y crydd.
    • English equivalent: Cobblers' children are worst shod.
    • "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

REdit

  • Rhaid cropian cyn cerdded.
    • English equivalent: Learn to walk before you can run.
    • Source: Library Association (1969). The Library Association record. The Library Association. p. 29. 

YEdit

  • Y sawl na weithied na fwytaed.
    • English equivalent: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • "Nothing is given to you. Whatever you do, you've got to work for it and earn it."
    • Jack Charlton, British football manager. From his interview with Martyn Lewis, in his book, Reflections on Success (1997)
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

See alsoEdit