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Warrior

person specializing in combat or warfare
(Redirected from Warriors)
The two worst strategic mistakes to make are acting prematurely and letting an opportunity slip; to avoid this, the warrior treats each situation as if it were unique and never resorts to formulae, recipes or other people's opinions. - Paulo Coelho
Each of us must expect an end of living in this world; let him who may win glory before death: for that is best at last for the departed warrior. - Beowulf
Strategy is the craft of the warrior. - Miyamoto Musashi

A warrior is a person specializing in combat or warfare, especially within the context of a tribal or clan-based warrior culture society that recognizes a separate warrior class or caste.

QuotesEdit

  • Better is it for each one of us that he should avenge his friend, than greatly mourn. Each of us must expect an end of living in this world; let him who may win glory before death: for that is best at last for the departed warrior.
  • The two worst strategic mistakes to make are acting prematurely and letting an opportunity slip; to avoid this, the warrior treats each situation as if it were unique and never resorts to formulae, recipes or other people's opinions.
    • Paulo Coelho, as quoted in Quotes That Help You Survive (2006) by Harpreet Kaur Kapoor.
  • We warriors of light must be prepared to have patience in difficult times and to know the Universe is conspiring in our favor, even though we may not understand how.
  • Every Warrior of the Light has suffered for the most trivial of reasons. Every Warrior of the Light has, at least once, believed he was not a Warrior of the Light.
    Every Warrior of the Light has failed in his spiritual duties.
    Every Warrior of the Light has said "yes" when he wanted to say "no."
    Every Warrior of the Light has hurt someone he loved.
    That is why he is a Warrior of the Light, because he has been through all this and yet has never lost hope of being better than he is.
    Each stone, each bend cries welcome to him. He identifies with the mountains and the streams, he sees something of his own soul in the plants and the animals and the birds of the field.
    Then, accepting the help of God and of God's signs, he allows his personal legend to guide him toward the tasks that life has reserved for him.
    On some nights, he has nowhere to sleep, on others he suffers from insomnia. "That's just how it is," thinks the warrior. "I was the one who chose to walk this path."
    In these words lies all his power: He chose the path along which he is walking and so has no complaints.
  • And, though the warrior's sun has set,
    Its light shall linger round us yet,
    Bright, radiant, blest.
    • Don Jorge Manrique, Coplas De Manrique. Last lines. Translation by Longfellow. Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 841-60.
  • It is said the warrior's is the twofold Way of pen and sword, and he should have a taste for both Ways. Even if a man has no natural ability he can be a warrior by sticking assiduously to both divisions of the Way. Generally speaking, the Way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death.
  • And the stern joy which warriors feel
    In foemen worthy of their steel.
  • Warriors!—and where are warriors found,
    If not on martial Britain's ground?
    And who, when waked with note of fire,
    Love more than they the British lyre?
  • The painful warrior famoused for fight,
    After a thousand victories once foiled,
    Is from the book of honour razed quite,
    And all the rest forgot for which he toiled.
  • The warrior is unique, he alone is the equal of many; Utu is unique, he alone is the equal of many. With your life you should always be on the side of the warrior; with your life you should always be on the side of Utu.
  • Prostrate on earth the bleeding warrior lies,
    And Isr'el's beauty on the mountains dies.
    How are the mighty fallen!
    Hush'd be my sorrow, gently fall my tears,
    Lest my sad tale should reach the alien's ears:
    Bid Fame be dumb, and tremble to proclaim
    In heathen Gath, or Ascalon, our shame
    Lest proud Philistia, lest our haughty foe,
    With impious scorn insult our solemn woe.
  • Home they brought her warrior dead.
  • No useless coffin enclosed his breast,
    Not in sheet nor in shroud we wound him;
    But he lay like a warrior taking his rest
    With his martial cloak around him.
    • Charles Wolfe, The Burial of Sir John Moore at Carunna, Stanza 3.

See alsoEdit

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