Varuna

deity associated with waters in Hinduism, Buddhism

Varuna (/ˈvɜːrʊnə, ˈvɑːrə-/; Sanskrit: वरुण, IAST: Varuṇa, Malay: Baruna) is a Vedic deity associated initially with the sky, later also with the seas as well as Ṛta (justice) and Satya (truth).

Varuna himself arose from the depth of the ocean and begged Rama for forgiveness.

QuotesEdit

  • The personification of ṛta among the Vedic gods is Varuṇa, lord (Asura) of heavenly hosts, the star-studded night sky, the oceanic expanse above us.
    • Is the term Dharma untranslatable? (in Saradindu Mukherji, ed.: Prabodhan 2, Delhi 2018) by Dr K. Elst, 2018 [1]
  • Varuṇa is the first one of the twelve Ādityas, “suns”, also named the “charioteers of ṛta”. He is iconographically depicted as sitting on a makara, a sea monster that in different contexts may be a dolphin or a crocodile. Makara happens to signify Capricorn in the Hellenistic zodiac (rāśicakra), meaning the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year, when the sun’s northward course (uttarāyaṇa) sets in, the Hindu equivalent of the Yuletide. Prehistorical woodhenges and stone circles with astronomical alignments teach us that it was the principal feast of the year worldwide.
    • Is the term Dharma untranslatable? (in Saradindu Mukherji, ed.: Prabodhan 2, Delhi 2018) by Dr K. Elst, 2018 [2]
  • He disciplines sinners, but also confers mercy: “Have mercy, spare me, Varuṇa.” (RV 7:89:1) Or: “Free us from sins committed by our fathers… Not our own will betrayed us, but seduction, thoughtlessness, oh Varuṇa, wine, dice, or anger.” (7:86:5-6) He makes his devotee medhira, “wise” (RV 7:87:4), meaning that he has and confers medhā, “wisdom”, the Sanskrit equivalent of Iranian mazdā.
    • Is the term Dharma untranslatable? (in Saradindu Mukherji, ed.: Prabodhan 2, Delhi 2018) by Dr K. Elst, 2018 [3]

External linksEdit

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