Qi Jiguang

Ming Dynasty general
Once you have acquired the skills, you must test them on an opponent, but in no way should you consider victory or submission to be a cause for shame or pride.

Qi Jiguang (simplified Chinese: 戚继光; traditional Chinese 戚繼光; 12 November 15285 January 1588) was a Ming dynasty Chinese military general who defended China against wokou pirates and reinforced the Great Wall against Mongol incursions. He authored several military manuals which have been widely read in China, Korea, and Japan.

QuotesEdit

Jixiao Xinshu (1560; 1584)Edit

Jixiao Xinshu (New Book Recording Effective Techniques) exists in two editions, the first (c. 1560) had 18 chapters, and the later addition (1584), re-edited with new material had 14.
  • The fist methods do not seem to concern themselves with the arts of great warfare; nevertheless, to move the hands and feet actively and to work habitually the limbs and body constitutes the gateway to beginning study and entering the art.
    • Chapter 14: The Chapter on the Fist Canon and the Essentials of Nimbleness
  • Once you have acquired the skills, you must test them on an opponent, but in no way should you consider victory or submission to be a cause for shame or pride. Rather, you ought to think, "By what means did I defeat him?" Or, "By what means could I have defeated him?" Then you exert and test yourself for a while.
    • Chapter 14: The Chapter on the Fist Canon and the Essentials of Nimbleness

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