Octavius Winslow

OctaviusWinslow.jpg

Octavius Winslow (August 1, 1808 – March 5, 1878), also known as "The Pilgrim's Companion", was one of the foremost evangelical preachers of the 19th Century in England and America. A Baptist minister for most of his life and contemporary of Charles Spurgeon and J.C. Ryle, he seceded to the Anglican church in his last decade.

SourcedEdit

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)Edit

Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).
  • The everlasting covenant which God has made with Jesus, and through Jesus with all His beloved people, individually, is a strong ground of consolation amidst the tremblings of human hope, the fluctuations of creature things, and the instability of all that earth calls good.
    • P. 144.
  • Prayer is the pulse of the renewed soul; and the constancy of its beat is the test and measure of the spiritual life.
    • P. 458.
  • There is poetry and there is beauty in real sympathy; but there is more — there is action. The noblest and most powerful form of sympathy is not merely the responsive tear, the echoed sigh, the answering look; it is the embodiment of the sentiment in actual help.
    • P. 574.

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 12 December 2010, at 19:59