Metrodorus of Lampsacus (the younger)

ancient Greek Epicurean philosopher

Metrodorus of Lampsacus (331/0 – 278/7 BC) was a Greek philosopher of the Epicurean school.

Metrodorus of Lampsacus

QuotesEdit

  • Occupavi te, Fortuna, atque cepi omnisque aditus tuos interclusi, ut ad me adspirare non posses.
    • I have prevented you, Fortune; I have caught you, and cut off every access, so that you cannot possibly reach me.
  • Esse aliquam cognatam tristitiae voluptatem [...].
  • [...] The source of happiness in ourselves [is] greater than that which arises from objects.
    • Attributed to Metrodorus by Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, II, 21, as translated by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, Clement of Alexandria, vol. II, in Ante-Nicene Christian Library: Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325, vol. XII, 1869, p. 74.
  • Remember, O Menestratus, that, being a mortal endowed with a circumscribed life, thou hast in thy soul ascended, till thou hast seen endless time, and the infinity of things; and what is to be, and what has been.
    • Attributed to Metrodorus by Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, V, 14, as translated by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, Clement of Alexandria, vol. II, in Ante-Nicene Christian Library: Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325, vol. XII, 1869, p. 300.

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit

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