Joseph Jacobs

British historian

Joseph Jacobs (29 August 1854 - 30 January 1916) was an Australian born folklorist who published books on English and Celtic fairy tales.

English Fairy Tales (1890)Edit

Preface to English Fairy TalesEdit

  • Who says that English folk have no fairy-tales of their own?

Whittington and his CatEdit

  • Turn again Whittington,
    Thrice Mayor of London
    • (said by the bells of London)

The Story of the Three Little PigsEdit

  • Little pig, little pig, let me come in.
    To which the pig answered: Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin.
    The wolf answered to that, Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow the house down.
  • Well, he [the wolf] huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he puffed and he puffed and huffed; but he could not get the house down.
  • When the pig saw what he [the wolf] was about, he hung on a pot full of water, and made a blazing fire...and in fell the wolf...

The Story of the Three BearsEdit

  • Out the Old Woman jumped (of the window). And whether she broke her neck in the fall; or ran into the wood and was lost there...or taken up by a constable to the House of Correction for the vagrant she was I cannot tell. But the Three Bears never saw anything more of her.
    • (note Goldilocks doesn't feature in this particular version of the story).
  • Who says that English folk have no fairy-tales of their own?

CatskinEdit

  • Kind sir, if the truth I must tell,
    At the sign of Basin of Water I dwell.
    • said by Princess Catskin

Henny-PennyEdit

  • The sky is a-going to fall, I must go and tell the King.
    • said by Henny-Penny, similar to the words said by Chicken Little

Jack and the BeanstalkEdit

  • There once was upon a time a poor widow who had an only son Jack, and a cow called Milky-White.
  • You don't know what these beans are, said the man [that Jack meets]. If you plant them overnight, by morning they grew right up to the sky.
  • My man is an ogre and there is nothing he likes better than boys broiled on toast.
  • Fee-fi-fo-fum,
    I smell the blood of an Englishman,
    Be he alive or be he dead
    I'll have his bones to grind my bread.
    • (said by the ogre or giant. Now rendered as I'll grind his bones to make my bread.)
  • But the Harp called out quite loud: Master! Master!

Molly WhuppieEdit

  • Fee, fi, fo, fum
    I smell the blood of some earthly one.
    • (said by a giant, see Jack and the Beanstalk above.)
  • Woe worth you, Molly Whuppie! never you come again
    Twice yet, carle, quoth she, I'll come to Spain.

More English Fairy Tales (1894)Edit

Pied PiperEdit

  • For out of every hole the rats came tumbling.

The Three WishesEdit

  • ...he must need wish in a hurry; and wish he did, that the black pudding may come off his nose.

CatskinEdit

  • Kind sir, if the truth I must tell,
    At the sign of Basin of Water I dwell.
    • (said by Princess Catskin).

Contents

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