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Ingo, or Ichio Ingo (1209 - August 21, 1281) was a Japanese Zen master and poet, and a disciple of Mugaku Sogen.

QuotesEdit

QuotesEdit

  • Hogo acquired importance as a calligraphic art expressing the personality and the cultural attainments of the zen priest writer... Typical of such is the hogo written by Mugaku Sogen (1226-1286) and presented to Ichio Ingo, ( -1281).
    • Japan Quarterly, Volume 17, 1970. p. 163
  • Koho Kenichi (1241-1316) was one of the most renowned Zen prelates of his era, his era, not least because of his Japanese origin. As son of Emperor Gosaga, he began his religious career in the esoteric Buddhist school. In 1256 he was admitted into the Tofukuji by Enni Ben'en. Four years later he met Gottan Funei, who had just moved there from China. As instructed by his teacher Enni Ben'en, Koho followed Gottan Funei to Kamakura. On Ichio Ingo's recommendation he came under the care of Koho Kennichi. He was calm and self-willed and preferred to live in seclusion. For this reason he spent many years in a remote area until his appointment as leading priest of the Jomyoji in 1300 and later of the Manjuji in Kamakura. In 1314 Mugaku Sogen entrusted him with the leadership of the great Kenchoji.
    • Ildegarda Scheidegger, Bokutotsuso. Studies on the Calligraphy of the Zen Master Muso Soseki (1275-1351), 2005. p. 117