Impossibility

It is obvious to common sense that there is no need of the passage of laws, or the adoption of other devices, to prevent what is in itself impossible. ~ Frederick Douglass

Impossibility is the state of something not being possible. In law, such a state of affairs is a defense to a breach of contract — for example, a contract to pay painters to paint a house may be voided as impossible if the house burns to the ground the day before the painters arrive.

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QuotesEdit

AEdit

  • Álomban és szerelemben nincs lehetetlenség.
    • In dreams and in love there are no impossibilities.
      • János Arany, as quoted in Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893) by James Wood, p. 11.

CEdit

  • It is not a lucky word, this same impossible; no good comes of those that have it so often in their mouth.
    • Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution, A History (1837), Part III, Book III, Chapter X.

DEdit

FEdit

HEdit

  • How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?

OEdit

  • When, therefore, as will be clear to those who read, the passage as a connected whole is literally impossible, whereas the outstanding part of it is not impossible but even true, the reader must endeavor to grasp the entire meaning, connecting by an intellectual process the account of what is literally impossible with the parts that are not impossible but historically true, these being interpreted allegorically in common with the part which, so far as the letter goes, did not happen at all. For our contention with regard to the whole of divine scripture is that it all has a spiritual meaning, but not all a bodily meaning; for the bodily meaning is often proved to be an impossibility.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical QuotationsEdit

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 390
  • You cannot make a crab walk straight.
  • And what's impossible, can't be,
    And never, never comes to pass.
  • Few things are impossible to diligence and skill.
  • Interestingly enough, Stephen Hawking once opposed the idea of time travel. He even claimed he had “empirical” evidence against it. If time travel existed, he said, then we would have been visited by tourists from the future. Since we see no tourists from the future, ergo: time travel is not possible. Because of the enormous amount of work done by theoretical physicists within the last 5 years or so, Hawking has since changed his mind, and now believes that time travel is possible (although not necessarily practical). (Furthermore, perhaps we are simply not very interesting to these tourists from the future. Anyone who can harness the power of a star would consider us to be very primitive. Imagine your friends coming across an ant hill. Would they bend down to the ants and give them trinkets, books, medicine, and power? Or would some of your friends have the strange urge to step on a few of them?)
In conclusion, don’t turn someone away who knocks at your door one day and claims to be your future great-great-great grandchild. They may be right.
  • Simul flare sorbereque haud facile
    Est: ego hic esse et illic simul, haud potui.
    • To blow and to swallow at the same time is not easy; I cannot at the same time be here and also there.
    • Plautus, Mostellaria, Act III. 2. 105.
  • Certum est quia impossibile est.
    • The fact is certain because it is impossible.
    • Tertullian, De Carne Christi, Chapter V, Part II. Called "Tertullian's rule of faith." Also given "Credo quia impossibile." I believe because it is impossible. Same idea in St. Augustine—Confessions, VI. 5. (7). Credo quia absurdum est. An anonymous rendering of the same.
  • You cannot make, my Lord, I fear, a velvet purse of a sow's ear.

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