Gregory Balestrero

American industrial engineer
This decade holds many changes for the United States, but the greatest needs regarding America's needs regarding America's productivity in the 1990s, are better education and employee training.
- G. Balestrero, 1990.

Gregory Balestrero (born July 16, 1947) is an American industrial engineer, and CEO Emeritus of the Project Management Institute. He has a record of overseeing administrative, financial and internal affairs for professional associations.

Contents

QuotesEdit

1990sEdit

  • This decade holds many changes for the United States, but the greatest needs regarding America's productivity in the 1990s, are better education and employee training.
    • American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Society for Integrated Manufacturing (1990). Manufacturing Review v.3 no.1-3 1990. p. 131.
  • Employees cannot become more productive in every sense of the word unless they are provided with continuous on-the-job training.
    • NACE International (1990). Materials Performance. p. 104.
  • Companies have a responsibility to train and retrain their employees.
    • Graduating Engineer. v.12 1990/1991 McGraw-Hill, 1990. p. 14.
  • The rapid deterioration of education has been recognized as a national problem for the past several years. Consequently, American businesses must meet the immediate challenge of poorly-educated people in today's workforce by strengthening employee training programs.
    • Public power (1990) Volume 48. American Public Power Association. p. 9

2000sEdit

  • Great leaders recognize that companies must innovate to remain competitive, and they nurture environments that encourage creative thinking... Innovation is rarely accidental — it takes an organizational commitment that starts at the executive level. The idea is not enough. As Thomas Edison said, innovation is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration. Too often companies forget the ‘perspiration’ or execution part of the equation.

2010sEdit

  • Dr. Cleland was among the first to see project management strategically as well as tactically, at the center of organizational competencies... It's hard to believe, but there was a time when it was new and unfamiliar. Dr. Cleland was a driving force behind the adoption of project management as a professional competency, and is a key contributor to the success of all organizations that use professional project management standards and methodologies today.

External linksEdit

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