Celebration

social event
(Redirected from Cherisher)

Celebration can refer to the act of rejoicing or of honoring various things, or to various social gatherings or parties for the observance and participation in particular feast days, holidays, or festivals.

The joy and function of poetry is, and was, the celebration of man, which is also the celebration of God. ~ Dylan Thomas

QuotesEdit

  • There's a party goin' on right here
    A celebration to last throughout the years
    So bring your good times, and your laughter too
    We gonna celebrate your party with you

    Come on now
    Celebration
    Let's all celebrate and have a good time
    Celebration
    We gonna celebrate and have a good time!

  • It's time to come together
    It's up to you, what's your pleasure
    Everyone around the world
    Come on!

    Yahoo! It's a celebration
    Yahoo!
    Celebrate good times, come on!
    It's a celebration
    Celebrate good times, come on!
    Let's celebrate!

  • You, masters of the earth – princes, kings, emperors, powerful majesties, invincible conquerors – simply try to make the people go on such-and-such a day each year to a given place to dance. I ask little of you, but I dare give you a solemn challenge to succeed, whereas the humblest missionary will succeed and be obeyed two thousand years after his death. Every year the people gather around some rustic temple in the name of St John, St Martin, St Benedict, etc.; they come, animated by a feverish and yet innocent eagerness; religion sanctifies their joy and the joy embellishes religion; they forget their troubles; on leaving they think of the pleasure that they will have on the same day the following year, and the date is set in their minds.
  • The best craftsmanship always leaves holes and gaps in the works of the poem so that something that is not in the poem can creep, crawl, flash, or thunder in. The joy and function of poetry is, and was, the celebration of man, which is also the celebration of God.
    • Dylan Thomas, in Poetic Manifesto, published in the Texas Quarterly (Winter 1961)

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