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Birth

process of giving birth to one or more offspring
(Redirected from Births)

Birth, also known as parturition, is the act or process of bearing or bringing forth offspring.

QuotesEdit

  • BIRTH, n. The first and direst of all disasters. As to the nature of it there appears to be no uniformity. Castor and Pollux were born from the egg. Pallas came out of a skull. Galatea was once a block of stone. Peresilis, who wrote in the tenth century, avers that he grew up out of the ground where a priest had spilled holy water. It is known that Arimaxus was derived from a hole in the earth, made by a stroke of lightning. Leucomedon was the son of a cavern in Mount Aetna, and I have myself seen a man come out of a wine cellar.
    • Ambrose Bierce, The Cynic's Dictionary (1906); republished as The Devil's Dictionary (1911).
  • He is born naked, and falls a whining at the first.
    • Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), Part I, Section II. Mem. 3. Subsect. 10.
  • A man is born alone and dies alone.
  • Moreover, the act of birth is the first experience of anxiety, and thus the source and prototype of the affect of anxiety.
    • Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), in a footnote Freud added to the Second Edition in 1909 (see Psychoanalytic Pioneers, p. 46.)
  • As some divinely gifted man,
    Whose life in low estate began,
    And on a simple village green;
    Who breaks his birth's invidious bar.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical QuotationsEdit

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 70.
  • Esaw selleth his byrthright for a messe of potage.
    • Chapter heading of the Genevan version and Matthew's Bible of Genesis XXV. (Not in authorized version).
  • And show me your nest with the young ones in it,
    I will not steal them away;
    I am old! you may trust me, linnet, linnet—
    I am seven times one to-day.
  • Lest, selling that noble inheritance for a poor mess of perishing pottage, you never enter into His eternal rest.
    • William Penn, No Cross no Crown, Part II, Chapter XX, Section XXIII.
  • Man alone at the very moment of his birth, cast naked upon the naked earth, does she abandon to cries and lamentations.
  • The dew of thy birth is of the womb of the morning.
    • The Psalter. Psalms. CX. 3.
  • "Do you know who made you?" "Nobody, as I knows on," said the child, with a short laugh. The idea appeared to amuse her considerably; for her eyes twinkled, and she added—
    "I 'spect I growed. Don't think nobody never made me."
  • When I was born I drew in the common air, and fell upon the earth, which is of like nature, and the first voice which I uttered was crying, as all others do.
    • Wisdom of Solomon, VII. 3.

See alsoEdit

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