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Cycling

riding a bicycle
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Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. ~ Albert Einstein
The bicycle is a city thing, virtually useless anywhere excepting on a pavement or hard surface of some kind. Without the road it would never have been invented. It is a little mad, both in design and purpose. Two wheels held together in a frame, with a simple mechanical system enabling a forward movement for one person. ~ William Saroyan
It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and can coast down them.... Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motorcar only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle. ~ Ernest Hemingway
Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. It makes her feel as if she were independent. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can't get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammelled womanhood. ~ Susan B. Anthony
Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live. ~ Mark Twain

Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. It involves riding bicycles, unicycles, tricycles and other human powered vehicles (HPVs). A bicycle is a pedal-driven land vehicle with two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other.

QuotesEdit

  • Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel. It gives a woman a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. It makes her feel as if she were independent. The moment she takes her seat she knows she can't get into harm unless she gets off her bicycle, and away she goes, the picture of free, untrammelled womanhood.
  • I want to die at a hundred years old with an American flag on my back and the star of Texas on my helmet, after screaming down an Alpine descent on a bicycle at 75 miles per hour. I want to cross one last finish line as my stud wife and my ten children applaud, and then I want to lie down in a field of those famous French sunflowers and gracefully expire, the perfect contradiction to my once anticipated poignant early demise.
  • Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving.
  • It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and can coast down them.... Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motorcar only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.
    • Ernest Hemingway, White, William, ed (1967). By-Line, Ernest Hemingway: Selected Articles and Dispatches of Four Decades by Ernest Hemingway. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. p. 364. 
  • Women in pro cycling have long fought for better pay, race opportunities, and safety. So far, it's been a difficult battle: 50 percent of women in the sport still earn only $11,800 or less per year, 17 percent get no salary at all, and a little more than half work second jobs to make ends meet.
  • Despite the grim statistics, the survey found that more women are racing today than in years past. Yet only 11 percent make more than $35,500 a year, roughly equivalent to the UCI’s minimum wage for male Pro Tour riders. There is no minimum salary for women.
  • The findings, which the Alliance presented to the UCI earlier, also outlines some demands that pro women have—primarily, access to health insurance. Second to that was post-career job placement or education. (Forty-eight percent of women pros have at least a four-year university degree, 19 percent have at least a master's degree, and 35 percent are currently enrolled as students.)
  • Bicycling is a big part of the future. It has to be. There's something wrong with a society that drives a car to work out in a gym.
    • Bill Nye — cited in: Liz Armstrong, Guy Dauncey, Anne Wordsworth (2007). Cancer: 101 Solutions to a Preventable Epidemic. New Society Publishers. p. 70. ISBN 978-0865715424. 
  • Going around the world on a bicycle is no longer enough -- the daredevil has got to go around the moon on a Pogo stick with one arm tied behind him if he wants to get his picture in the paper.
  • The bicycle is a city thing, virtually useless anywhere excepting on a pavement or hard surface of some kind. Without the road it would never have been invented. It is a little mad, both in design and purpose. Two wheels held together in a frame, with a simple mechanical system enabling a forward movement for one person.
  • The steps of one's progress are distinctly marked. At the end of each lesson he knows he has acquired something, and he also knows what that something is, and likewise that it will stay with him. It is not like studying German, where you mull along, in a groping, uncertain way, for thirty years; and at last, just as you think you've got it, they spring the subjunctive on you, and there you are. No -- and I see now, plainly enough, that the great pity about the German language is, that you can't fall off it and hurt yourself. There is nothing like that feature to make you attend strictly to business. But I also see, by what I have learned of bicycling, that the right and only sure way to learn German is by the bicycling method. That is to say, take a grip on one villainy of it at a time, and learn it -- not ease up and shirk to the next, leaving that one half learned.
  • Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live.
  • I began to feel that myself plus the bicycle equaled myself plus the world, upon whose spinning wheel we must all earn to ride, or fall into the sluiceways of oblivion and despair. That which made me succeed with the bicycle was precisely what had gained me a measure of success in life -- it was the hardihood of spirit that led me to begin, the persistence of will that held me to my task, and the patience that was willing to begin again when the last stroke had failed. And so I found high moral uses in the bicycle and can commend it as a teacher without pulpit or creed. She who succeeds in gaining the mastery of the bicycle will gain the mastery of life.
    • Frances E. Willard, How I Learned To Ride The Bicycle (1895)

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