Alice Cary

We serve Him most who take the most of His exhaustless love.

Alice Cary (April 26, 1820February 12, 1871) was a poet born near Cincinnati, Ohio. She and her younger sister, Phoebe Cary, co-published poems in 1849. They lived on the Clovernook farm in North College Hill, Ohio.

QuotesEdit

  • Yea, when mortality dissolves,
     Shall I not meet thine hour unawed?
    My house eternal in the heavens
     Is lighted by the smile of God!
    • "Reconciled" in A Memorial of Alice and Phoebe Cary: with some of their later poems (1875) edited by Mary Clemmer Ames, p. 182.
  • We serve Him most who take the most of His exhaustless love.
    • Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 129.
  • Desolate—Life is so dreary and desolate—
    Women and men in the crowd meet and mingle,
    Yet with itself every soul standeth single,
    Deep out of sympathy moaning its moan—
    Holding and having its brief exultation—
    Making its lonesome and low lamentation—
    Fighting its terrible conflicts alone.
    • Life; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 189.
  • How many lives we live in one,
    And how much less than one, in all.
    • Life's Mysteries; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 442.

Quotes about Alice CaryEdit

  • Her religious sentiments were deep and strong, her faith in the Eternal Goodness unwavering. Educated in the faith of Universalism, she believed to the last in the final salvation of all God's children.
    • Oliver Johnson, in obituary in The Tribune, quoted in A Memorial of Alice and Phoebe Cary: with some of their later poems (1875) edited by Mary Clemmer Ames, p. 187.

External linksEdit