Āraññikattassa

Āraññikattassa, in Buddhism, is the practice of dwelling in forests, content, in solitude, secluded and aloof from the world.

Alone and self-disciplined, I’ll quickly enter the delightful forest, which gives joy to meditators.

QuotesEdit

  • "For a long time, venerable sir, I have been a forest dweller and have spoken in praise of forest dwelling; I have been an almsfood eater and have spoken in praise of eating almsfood; I have been a rag-robe wearer and have spoken in praise of wearing rag-robes; I have been a triple-robe user and have spoken in praise of using the triple robe; I have been of few wishes and have spoken in praise of fewness of wishes; I have been content and have spoken in praise of contentment; I have been secluded and have spoken in praise of solitude; I have been aloof from society and have spoken in praise of aloofness from society; I have been energetic and have spoken in praise of arousing energy."...

    "Good, good, Kassapa! You are practising for the welfare and happiness of the multitude, out of compassion for the world, for the good, welfare, and happiness of devas and humans. Therefore, Kassapa, wear worn-out hempen rag-robes, walk for alms, and dwell in the forest."

    • Kassapa and the Blessed One in Saṃyutta Nikāya, 16.5, as translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi (2000)
  • In the past ... when a bhikkhu was a forest dweller and spoke in praise of forest dwelling … the elder bhikkhus would invite him to a seat. ... Now it is the bhikkhu who is well known and famous ... that the elder bhikkhus invite to a seat. ... Then it occurs to the newly ordained bhikkhus: ‘It seems that when a bhikkhu is well known and famous, ... the elder bhikkhus invite him to a seat.’ ... They practise accordingly, and that leads to their harm and suffering for a long time.
  • Come now, I’ll go alone
    to the wilderness praised by the Buddha.
    It’s pleasant for a mendicant
    to be dwelling alone and resolute.

    Alone and self-disciplined,
    I’ll quickly enter the delightful forest,
    which gives joy to meditators,
    and is frequented by rutting elephants.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit