Last modified on 8 November 2014, at 17:52

Talk:A. J. Liebling

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Further researchEdit

The complete text of The New Yorker from this time period has been collected and sold on CD-ROM. It should be possible to find all of these quotations and determine the proper citations (including article title and page number, two elements missing from the sourced quotes here). 121a0012 17:02, 4 March 2006 (UTC)

UnsourcedEdit

  • News is like the tilefish which appears in great schools off the Atlantic Coast some years and then vanishes, no one knows whither or for how long. Newspapers might employ these periods searching for the breeding grounds of news, but they prefer to fill up with stories about Kurdled Kurds or Calvin Coolidge, until the banks close or a Hitler marches, when they are as surprised as their readers.
  • The function of the press in society is to inform, but its role in society is to make money. [Now sourced: 'Foreword: The End of Free Lunch' from The Press collection of articles by Liebling, Ballantine Books, New York 1961 p 7]