Last modified on 3 April 2015, at 06:45

A. J. Liebling

Pencil sketch of A.J. Liebling

Abbott Joseph "Joe" Liebling (born October 18, 1904, in New York City; died December 28, 1963) was an American journalist who was closely associated with The New Yorker from 1935 until his death. Best known as a press critic, Liebling wrote the magazine's "Wayward Press" feature from 1945 on.

SourcedEdit

  • As a result of its generous stand [Robert Maynard Hutchins’ controversial policy of admitting students after their second year of high-school], the University of Chicago’s undergraduate college acts as the greatest magnet for neurotic juveniles since the Children’s Crusade, with Robert Maynard Hutchins…playing the role of Stephen the Shepherd Boy.
    • Chicago: The Second City (Knopf, 1952; University of Nebraska Press, 2004, ISBN 0-8032-8035-1), p. 110.
  • Inconsiderate to the last, Josef Stalin, a man who never had to meet a deadline, had the bad taste to die in installments.
    • The New Yorker, March 28, 1953, quoted in David Remnick, "Reporting It All: A.J. Liebling at 100", The New Yorker, March 29, 2004.
  • The subject [of Stalin's death] permitted a rare blend of invective and speculation—both Hearst papers, as I recall, ran cartoons of Stalin being rebuffed at the gates of Heaven, where Hearst had no correspondents—and I have seldom enjoyed a week of newspaper reading more.
    • Just Enough Liebling: Classic Work by the Legendary New Yorker Writer, p. 23.
  • People everywhere confuse what they read in newspapers with news.
  • Show me a poet, and I'll show you a shit.
    • The New Yorker, March 28, 1953, quoted in David Remnick, "Reporting It All: A.J. Liebling at 100", The New Yorker, March 29, 2004.


The road back to Paris (1988)Edit

  • You can hope for lucky encounters only if you walk around a lot.
  • A man´s taste is formed more by his culture, his profession, and the period in which he is young than by his race or politics.



External linksEdit

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