Last modified on 27 October 2014, at 14:13

Apocalypse Now

The horror! The horror!
Your mission is to proceed up the Nung River in a Navy patrol boat. Pick up Colonel Kurtz's path at Nu Mung Ba...

Apocalypse Now is a 1979 film that follows Captain Willard on a dangerous mission into Cambodia to assassinate a renegade Green Beret who has set himself up as a god among a local tribe.

Directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Written by Francis Ford Coppola and John Milius.
The Horror. . . The Horror. . .taglines

Colonel Walter E. KurtzEdit

  • I watched a snail crawl along the edge of a straight razor. That's my dream. That's my nightmare. Crawling, slithering, along the edge of a straight razor . . . and surviving.
  • I've seen horrors, horrors that you've seen. But you have no right to call me a murderer. You have a right to kill me. You have a right to do that, but you have no right to judge me. It's impossible for words to describe what is necessary to those who do not know what horror means. Horror! Horror has a face, and you must make a friend of horror. Horror and moral terror are your friends. If they are not, then they are enemies to be feared. They are truly enemies.
  • I worry that my son might not understand what I've tried to be. And if I were to be killed, Willard, I would want someone to go to my home and tell my son everything – everything I did, everything you saw – because there's nothing that I detest more than the stench of lies. And if you understand me, Willard, you will do this for me.
  • The horror! The horror! [Kurtz's last words]

Captain Benjamin L. WillardEdit

Everything I saw told me that Kurtz had gone insane. … If I was still alive, it was because he wanted me that way.
  • [voiceover] There is no way to tell his story without telling my own. And if his story really is a confession, then so is mine.
  • [voiceover] It's a way we had over here with living with ourselves. We cut 'em in half with a machine gun and give 'em a Band-Aid. It was a lie. And the more I saw them, the more I hated lies.
  • [reading a letter Kurtz has sent to his son]
    Dear son,
    I'm afraid that both you and your mother would have been worried for not hearing from me these past weeks. But my situation here has become a difficult one. I've been officially accused of murder by the Army. The alleged victims were four Vietnamese double agents. We spent months uncovering and accumulating evidence. When absolute proof was completed, we acted, we acted like soldiers. The charges are unjustified. They are in fact, under the circumstances of this conflict, quite completely insane. In a war, there are many moments for compassion and tender action. There are many moments for ruthless action, for what is often called ruthless, what may in many circumstances be only clarity; seeing clearly what there is to be done and doing it directly, quickly, aware … looking at it. I would trust you to tell your mother what you choose about this letter. As for the charges, I'm unconcerned. I'm beyond their timid, lying morality. And so I'm beyond caring.
    You have all my faith.
    Your loving father."
  • [voiceover] They were gonna make me a major for this, and I wasn't even in their fuckin' army anymore. Everybody wanted me to do it, him most of all. I felt like he was up there, waiting for me to take the pain away. He just wanted to go out like a soldier, standing up, not like some poor, wasted, rag-assed renegade. Even the jungle wanted him dead, and that's who he really took his orders from anyway.

Lieutenant Colonel William "Bill" KilgoreEdit

I love the smell of napalm in the morning.
  • You smell that? Do you smell that? Napalm, son. Nothing else in the world smells like that. I love the smell of napalm in the morning. You know, one time we had a hill bombed, for 12 hours. When it was all over, I walked up. We didn't find one of 'em, not one stinkin' dink body. The smell, you know that gasoline smell, the whole hill. Smelled like . . . victory. Someday this war's gonna end.
  • Charlie don't surf. But what if i wanna surf? Well too damn bad.

Engineman 3rd Class Jay "Chef" HicksEdit

Fucking tiger!
  • I used to think if I died in an evil place, then my soul wouldn't be able to make it to heaven. But now, fuck. I don't care where it goes as long it ain't here.

PhotojournalistEdit

  • This is the way the fucking world ends. Look at this fucking shit we're in man. Not with a bang, but with a whimper. And with a whimper, I'm fucking splitting, Jack. (Note: This is a variation on T.S. Eliot's The Hollow Men – "This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but a whimper".)
  • [talking to Willard about Kurtz] Why? Why would a nice guy like you want to kill a genius? Feeling pretty good, huh? Why? Do you know that the man really likes you? He likes you. He really likes you. But he's got something in mind for you. Aren't you curious about that? I'm curious. I'm very curious. Are you curious? There's something happening out here, man. You know something, man? I know something you that you don't know. That's right, Jack. The man is clear in his mind, but his soul is mad. Oh, yeah. He's dying, I think. He hates all this. He hates it! But the man's a . . . He reads poetry out loud, all right. And a voice . . . he likes you because you're still alive. He's got plans for you. No, I'm not gonna help you. You're gonna help him, man. You're gonna help him. I mean, what are they gonna say when he's gone? 'Cause he dies when it dies, when it dies, he dies! What are they gonna say about him? He was a kind man? He was a wise man? He had plans? He had wisdom? Bullshit, man! And am I gonna be the one that's gonna set them straight? Look at me! Look at me! Wrong! [points to Willard] You!

Lieutenant General CormanEdit

  • Well, you see Willard . . . In this war, things get confused out there, power, ideals, the old morality, practical military necessity. But out there with these natives, it must be a temptation to be god. Because there's a conflict in every human heart, between the rational and the irrational, between good and evil. And good does not always triumph. Sometimes, the dark side overcomes what Lincoln called the better angels of our nature. Every man has got a breaking point. You and I have one. Walter Kurtz has reached his. And very obviously, he has gone insane.

DialogueEdit

Colonel G. Lucas: Your mission is to proceed up the Nung River in a Navy patrol boat. Pick up Colonel Kurtz's path at Nu Mung Ba, follow it, and learn what you can along the way. When you find the Colonel, infiltrate his team by whatever means available and terminate the Colonel's command.
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: Terminate the Colonel?
General Corman: He's out there operating without any decent restraint, totally beyond the pale of any acceptable human conduct. And he is still in the field commanding troops.
Jerry: Terminate with extreme prejudice.
Colonel G. Lucas: You understand, Captain, that this mission does not exist, nor will it ever exist.
Terminate with extreme prejudice.

Engineman 3rd Class Jay "Chef" Hicks: How come all you guys sit on your helmets?
Soldier: So we don't get our balls blown off.
[Chef laughs a little, seems to think for a second, and then sits on his helmet.]

Captain Benjamin L. Willard: Are you crazy, God damn it? Don't you think its a little risky for some R&R?
Lieutenant Colonel William "Bill" Kilgore: If I say it's safe to surf this beach, Captain, then it's safe to surf this beach. I mean, I'm not afraid to surf this place, I'll surf this whole fucking place!

Captain Benjamin L. Willard: Who's the commanding officer here, soldier?
Infantryman: Ain't you?
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: Soldier, do you know who's in command here?
The Roach: Yeah.
[He turns away.]

Captain Benjamin L. Willard: My mission is to make it up into Cambodia. There's a Green Beret Colonel up there who's gone insane. I'm supposed to kill him.
Engineman 3rd Class Jay "Chef" Hicks: That's fucking typical! Shit. Fuckin' Vietnam mission! I'm short, and we gotta go up there so you can kill one of our own guys? That's fuckin' great! That's just fuckin' great, man. Shit. That's fuckin'... crazy! I thought you were going in there to blow up a bridge, or, some fucking railroad tracks or somethin'.

I don't see any method at all, sir.
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: Could we, uh, talk to Colonel Kurtz?
Photojournalist: Hey, man, you don't talk to the Colonel. You listen to him. The man's enlarged my mind. He's a poet-warrior in the classic sense. I mean, sometimes he'll, uh, well, you'll say hello to him, right? And he'll just walk right by you, and he won't even notice you. And suddenly he'll grab you, and he'll throw you in a corner, and he'll say "Do you know that 'if' is the middle word in life? 'If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you, if you can trust yourself when all men doubt you'..." I mean, I'm no, I can't – I'm a little man, I'm a little man, he's, he's a great man. "I should have been a pair of ragged claws scuttling across floors of silent seas" … (Note: The last sentences here reference first Rudyard Kipling's poem If— and then T.S. Eliot's poem The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.)

Colonel Walter E. Kurtz: Did they say why, Willard, why they want to terminate my command?
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: I was sent on a classified mission, sir.
Colonel Walter E. Kurtz: It's no longer classified, is it? Did they tell you?
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: They told me that you had gone totally insane, and that your methods were unsound.
Colonel Walter E. Kurtz: Are my methods unsound?
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: I don't see any method at all, sir.
Colonel Walter E. Kurtz: I expected someone like you. What did you expect? Are you an assassin?
Captain Benjamin L. Willard: I'm a soldier.
Colonel Walter E. Kurtz: You're neither. You're an errand boy, sent by grocery clerks, to collect a bill.

CastEdit

TaglinesEdit

  • The Horror. . . The Horror. . .
  • THIS IS THE END!
  • To the victims go the spoils.
  • this is the end
  • MORNING SMELLS Some People Like Coffee. Some People Like Napalm.
  • The horror...the horror.
  • It is impossible to describe what is necessary, to those who do not know what horror means. You must make a friend of horror.

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
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