William Lenthall

I have, Sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this place, but as the house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here.

William Lenthall (15919 November 1662) was an English politician during the period of the English Civil War, and Speaker of the House of Commons in the Long Parliament (1640–1653).

QuotesEdit

  • I have, Sir, neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak, in this place, but as the house is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here; and I humbly ask pardon that I cannot give any other answer to what your majesty is pleased to demand of me.
    • Response to King Charles I on being asked the whereabouts of five fugitive members of the House of Commons (4 January 1642), from the journal of Sir Simonds d'Ewes, quoted in Cobbett's Parliamentary History of England : From the Norman conquest, in 1066. To the year, 1803 (1807), p. 1010
  • As to my body and burial, I do leave it to the disposition and discretion of my executor, hereafter named, but with this special charge, that it be done as privately as may be, without any state, acknowledging myself to be unworthy of the least outward regard in this world, and unworthy of any remembrance, that hath been so great a sinner, and I do further charge and desire that no monument be made for me, but at the utmost a plain stone with this inscription only — Vermis sum. [I am a worm.]
    • Last will, as quoted in History of Burford (1891) by William John Monk, p. 131

External linksEdit

Last modified on 6 June 2012, at 20:42