Last modified on 31 July 2014, at 17:33

William Ellery Channing (poet)

I sing New England, as she lights her fire
In every Prairie's midst; and where the bright
Enchanting stars shine pure through Southern night,
She still is there, the guardian on the tower,
To open for the world a purer hour.
Most joyful let the Poet be;
It is through him that all men see.

William Ellery Channing (June 10, 1818December 23, 1901) was a Transcendentalist poet and nephew of the Unitarian preacher William Ellery Channing.

QuotesEdit

  • I laugh, for hope hath happy place with me;
    If my bark sinks, 't is to another sea.
    • A Poet's Hope, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • I sing New England, as she lights her fire
    In every Prairie's midst; and where the bright
    Enchanting stars shine pure through Southern night,
    She still is there, the guardian on the tower,
    To open for the world a purer hour.
    • New England, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Most joyful let the Poet be;
    It is through him that all men see.
    • The Poet of the old and new Times, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • My highway is unfeatured air,
    My consorts are the sleepless stars,
    And men my giant arms upbear —
    My arms unstained and free from scars.
    • Hymn of the Earth, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • A wail in the wind is all I hear;
    A voice of woe for a lover's loss.
    • Tears in Spring, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

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