Last modified on 17 May 2014, at 23:44

User:Lo Ximiendo

Proverbs as stated on the BBC News websiteEdit

  • “Much silence has a mighty noise” - A Swahili proverb sent by Robert Porter in Tema, Ghana
  • “A house built with saliva will be washed away by the morning dew” - A Yoruba proverb sent by Afolabi Salawu and Yemiolorunsogo, both in Nigeria
  • “Until the lion tells his side of the story, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter” - Sent by Smith Moyo, Malawi (I wonder what that means...)
  • “When you see an old man running in a thorn forest, if he is not running after something then something is running after him” - Yoruba proverb sent by Yomi, from Porto, Portugal
  • “Ears that do not listen to advice accompany the head when it is chopped off” - Sent by Michael Ebong in Lagos, Nigeria, and Chea Wesseh in Saclepea, Liberia
  • “Kola nuts last longer in the mouths of those who value them” - Sent by Bonti Benjamin, in Ghana, and Okeke James in Nigeria (everyone has a different interest, perhaps?)
  • “Rain does not fall on one roof alone” - Sent by Peyechu Delphine Shiyghan, Bamenda, Cameroon (of problems that affect anyone and everyone, perhap?)
  • “The fall of a dead leaf is a warning to the green ones” - Sent by Alex Wewele, Delta State, Nigeria
  • “The dead man does not know the value of his coffin” - Sent by Francis Kabika, Senanga, Zambia
  • “The chicken does not forget the person who plucked its tail feathers during the rainy season” - An Igbo proverb sent by Nnabuife N Orji, Festac, Nigeria
  • “When spider webs unite, they can tie up a lion” - Sent by Fisum T, Ethiopia
  • “Better to stumble with the foot than with the tongue” - A Swahili proverb sent by Meg Burley, London, UK
  • “In a court of fowls, the cockroach never wins a case” - A proverb from Rwanda and Burundi sent by Imonitie C Imoisili in Lagos, Nigeria
  • “A cooking pot for the chameleon is a cooking pot for the lizard” - A Nigerian proverb sent by Michael Okorie, Tromso, Norway (here's a possible equivalent: what's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander)
  • “A child does not teach how to breastfeed” - Sent by Moses Mayen Mayen, South Sudan
  • “Despise not a snail for its slow and struggling movement; it has a destination and with time it shall arrive” - Sent by Alfred Jah Johnson, Pennsylvania, United States
  • “Those who die as the result of their folly are many; those who die as the result of their wisdom are few” - Sent by Amos Faleye, Ogun state, Nigeria
  • “When the leopard has a toothache, then the goat can go and collect a debt” - A Krio proverb from Sierra Leone sent by Sigismond Wilson, Oklahoma, US
  • “Bad dancing does not break an engagement” - A Luyia / Gisu proverb sent by Sheila Oder, Kampala, Uganda
  • “One who enters the forest does not listen to the breaking of the twigs in the bush” - A Bemba proverb from Zambia sent by Alexis Kabanda, Ottawa, Canada
  • “One who throws away the seed pod does not realize that he has thrown away a basket of vegetables” - An Igbo proverb sent by Nnamdi Udoye, London, UK (waste not, want not?)
  • “When they wish to eat a vulture, they call it a guinea fowl” - An Amharic proverb sent by Kebede Deribe, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • “When there is no enemy within, the enemies outside cannot hurt you” - Sent by Wolit William, Kampala, Uganda
  • “Only a madman would go to sleep with his roof on fire” - Sent by Mohamed Sinera, Serekunda, The Gambia
  • “The ugliest donkey has the most painful kick” - A Somali proverb sent by Warda Mahamed, Birmingham, UK (about insults, is it?)
  • “The shadow of a stick cannot protect you from the sun” - A Swahili proverb sent by Abdul Ally, Moose Jaw, Canada
  • “When brothers fight to the death, a stranger inherits their father's estate” - An Igbo proverb sent by Ugochukwu Okwesili-Val, Anambra State, Nigeria
  • “A son who thoughtlessly buys a pair of shoes for his lame father needs to be reminded of his father's disability” - A Yoruba proverb sent by Ayo Awoyele, Peterborough, UK
  • “The tongue cannot claim to be ignorant of what the teeth are doing” - Sent by Ibrahim Batambuze, Mukono, Uganda
  • “The town trap is not for the rat alone” - A Liberian proverb sent by T Chuku Welwolo, South Plainfield, NJ, United States
  • “The stick of truth may be overstretched but truth will eventually prevail” - An Eritrean proverb sent by Jonathan Okbamichael, London, UK
  • “A vulture has no business with the barber” - A Yoruba proverb sent by Anyanwu Chima, Lagos, Nigeria (of prejudicial people, perhaps?)
  • “When a tree has no more fruit, birds fly over it” - A Kiganda proverb sent by Joshua Kisawuzi, Kampala, Uganda
  • “Kicking a frog will only help it leap forward” - A Shona proverb sent by Cleophas Gwakwara, in Harare, Zimbabwe, and Takudzwa Kufa, in the UK
  • “Ask for a camel when you expect to get a goat” - Sent by Maurice K Amulundu, Khartoum, Sudan
  • “You have to be patient if you want to prise a worm from a chicken” - A Bemba proverb sent by Chisenga Bwalanda, Lusaka, Zambia
  • “Look for a black goat while it is still daytime” - Sent by Ellis Gideon Gesah, Yerima Gassol, Taraba State, Nigeria
  • “The family tree may bend but it never breaks” - A Krio proverb sent by Hassan Tahini, Freetown, Sierra Leone
  • “Give a stammerer enough time and he will pronounce his father's name” - A Yoruba proverb sent by Johnson Folorunso Ajayi, Southport, UK
  • “Lying can get you a wife, but it won't keep her” - A Cameroonian proverb sent by Odette Eya Oteh, London, UK
  • “Don't catch a leopard by the tail, but if you do, don't let it go” - Sent by Aman, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • “The termite is merely wishful, it can't sting the stone” - A Yoruba proverb sent by Olatunji Muyiwa, Ondo, Nigeria
  • “A crying hungry child cannot be consoled by tales of past prosperity” - A Bemba proverb sent by Chisenga Bwalanda, Lusaka, Zambia
  • “No matter how low a cotton tree falls, it's still taller than grass” - A Krio proverb from Sierra Leone sent by Sigismond Wilson, Oklahoma, US
  • “Mountains never meet but people do” - Sent by Estar Nalwanga, Entebbe, Uganda
  • “If a donkey kicks you and you kick back, you are both donkeys” - Sent by Keefa Nuwahereza, in Kampala, Uganda, and Nhial Kheer, in Nairobi, Kenya
  • “Even if Christ's death could have been prevented, Judas would still have been a traitor” - An Ethiopian proverb sent by Kudzai Mutizhe, High Wycombe, UK
  • “No amount of rain can wash the spots off a leopard” - Sent by Dah Fritz Welbeck, in Ghana, and Zina in Nigeria
  • “Don't set out on a journey using someone else's donkey” - Sent by Wadani Mogadishu, Somalia
  • “If the tiger sits, do not think it is out of respect” - A Nilotic proverb sent by James Owich, Gulu, Uganda
  • “A person who eats with you does not die for you, but one who is born with you will” - A Swahili proverb sent by Ibrahim Hassan, Kenya
  • “Do not beat a drum with an axe” - Sent by Agonbiri Argon D'Darlingboy Akonsabe, Kumasi, Ghana
  • “You will never know the importance of the buttocks until you have a boil on one of them” - Sent by Prosper Anku Gbena and Rauf Chifado, both in Ghana
  • “You cannot kill a louse with one finger” - Sent by Janny Nyendwa and Pardon Nkandu Anthony Ngosa in Zambia, Kelvin Kaunda in Malawi and Josephine Jamu in the UK
  • “When God made Sudan, he laughed” - A Sudanese proverb sent by Tut John Nyuon in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • “If the one who stabbed forgets, the one who got stabbed never forgets” - Sent by Sam Dan, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and Nurie Ahmed, Toronto, Canada
  • “Crowing cocks were once eggs” - A Luganda proverb sent by Miriam Jade Pedro, Kampala, Uganda