Last modified on 13 May 2014, at 13:23

Talk:Rita Mae Brown

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I think the exact wording of the quote is

"It is not the function of the government to tell people who to love or how to love. The only people who are truly queer are those who cannot love."

Only "insane" with deterministic processes :-)Edit

Of course, some processes are nondeterministic (i.e., they will not give the same result for the same input every time) and in their case repeating is not "insane". Otherwise many computational physicists would qualify as insane :-) See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nondeterministic_algorithm

UnsourcedEdit

  • A woman who will tell her age will tell anything.
  • About all you can do is be who you are. Some people will love you for you. Most will love you for what you can do for them, and some won't like you at all.
  • Art is moral passion married to entertainment. Moral passion without entertainment is propaganda, and entertainment without moral passion is television.
  • Creativity comes from trust. Trust your instincts. And never hope more than you work.
  • I became a lesbian because of women, because women are beautiful, strong and compassionate.
  • I believe the true function of age is memory. I'm recording as fast as I can.
  • I don't want to die. I think death is a greatly overrated experience.
  • I think of birth as the search for a larger apartment.
  • If you can't raise consciousness, at least raise hell.
  • No government has the right to tell its citizens when or whom to love... The only queer people in the world are those who don’t love anyone.
    • Seen on the back of a grocery receipt
  • One of the keys to happiness is a bad memory.
  • The only queer people are those who don't love anybody.
  • Lead me not into temptation; I can find the way myself. (As quoted in “The Portable curmudgeon” (1987) by Jon Winokur; Page 270.; The earliest source found for this quote is “Mother Jones – Volume 7″ (1982); Page 63, where it was quoted anonymously.)

Please verify by including the exact quote and passage from the actual book.Edit

Has it been validated that this quote is actually in the book? Otherwise, it would be a clever way to gain attention since it is such a widely used quote (annoyingly so) attributed to so many famous people. Can it be confirmed if the author originated the quote or just used what she heard from Albert Einstein or someone else?

"Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results." Sudden Death (Bantam Books, New York, 1983), p. 68. Note: This same quote has also been variously attributed to Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein and an old Chinese proverb —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 129.42.208.173 (talkcontribs) 21:17, 15 September 2009 (UTC)

Yes, this exact quote (without the first comma) appears on p. 68 of the cited edition. The immediately preceding context is "Unfortunately, Susan didn't remember what Jane Fulton once said," followed by the quote in quotation marks. (Fulton is a fictional character in the book.)
Fred R. Shapiro attributes this to Brown unequivocally in The Yale Book of Quotations (Yale University Press, 2006, ISBN 0300107986), p. 109[1], but Ralph Keyes suggests in The Quote Verifier (Macmillan, 2006, ISBN 0312340044), p. 98–99[2] that, although no earlier published occurrence is currently known, it may not have been original. I am highly skeptical of un-sourced attributions to people who are the frequent object of the second axiom of The Rules of Misquotation. While the general notion that it is foolish to reiterate the ineffectual is surely timeless, I see no reason to doubt that this particular wording is original to Brown. ~ Ningauble 16:33, 16 September 2009 (UTC)

WhatEdit

Insanity should be defined as doing the same thing over and over again and getting different results.