Talk:Ibn Khaldun

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About the use of "arabs" instead of "bedouins". If there is a point at the end of the article that states that most scholars think that Ibn Khaldun actually meant "Bedouins" when he used the word "Arabs", why keep using "arabs" instead of the right meaning "bedouins".

About the use of "arabs" instead of "bedouins".Edit

About the use of "arabs" instead of "bedouins". If there is a point at the end of the article that states that most scholars think that Ibn Khaldun actually meant "Bedouins" when he used the word "Arabs", why keep using "arabs" instead of the right meaning "bedouins".

What did ibn khaldoun write aboutEdit

Ibn Khaldūn has often been referred to as a Polymath, but even so there are few examples of his writings. One such is “al-Kitabu Libar” or his ‘History of the World.’ Other works of his are referred to within other works (by other people) and include such as:

“A commentary on the Islamic Theology of Fakhr al-Din al-Razi.”

A work on Sufism “Sifa’u l-Sail”.

Another is a work on logic, “allaqa lil-Sultan”

The point to keep in mind that in his day and time he was an individual who studied and researched in many disciplines and it is logical to assume that he wrote on most of them, if not all—This unsigned comment is by 197.7.7.164 (talkcontribs) .

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On economicsEdit

  • In the early stages of the state, taxes are light in their incidence, but fetch in a large revenue...As time passes and kings succeed each other, they lose their tribal habits in favor of more civilized ones. Their needs and exigencies grow...owing to the luxury in which they have been brought up. Hence they impose fresh taxes on their subjects...[and] sharply raise the rate of old taxes to increase their yield...But the effects on business of this rise in taxation make themselves felt. For business men are soon discouraged by the comparison of their profits with the burden of their taxes...Consequently production falls off, and with it the yield of taxation.
    • This sociological theory includes the concept known in economics as the Khaldun-Laffer Curve (the relationship between tax rates and tax revenue follows an inverted U shape).
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 22:39