Last modified on 27 October 2010, at 06:18

Talk:Hillary Rodham Clinton

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Where'd "It Takes A Village" come from?Edit

I've always, well not ALWAYS literally of course, but until today I've assumed that the phrase "it takes a village to raise a child" was first uttered, at least in western society, by Hillary Rodham Clinton. So I was mildly dismayed to find when I was researching for this other wikiquote page that the phrase wasn't mentioned here in the Hillary Clinton wikiquote article as having been directly sourced to her, but only attributed in a way that insinuated she said it arbitrarily -- as if she were sourcing something else. So I researched further and discovered the term's actually assumed in some circles to be an African proverb. I think. I can't actually get a reliable source on that but that's where my limited research capabilities direct me. However, here in wikiquote, the phrase isn't even referenced over there. So I guess my question here is, does anyone know if Clinton was the first to mention it in western civilization, or did she get it from oh I don't know Aldous Huxley or Arianna Huffington or somebody..? And would it be appropriate to put the phrase here or there or anywhere, frankly? I'll keep researching it but I can't determine if anyone knows, really. I'm not even sure if Clinton herself knows where she first heard it. If she thinks she made it up herself is that sufficient, or..? Oh I don't know. ZachsMind 15:56, 19 July 2005 (UTC)

I am fairly confident that the expression was known in the USA before she said it. It is said to be an African proverb. Steve Dufour 22:30, 29 November 2007 (UTC)
When did she first use the term? The movie "Bye Bye Love", which was released in 1995 (before her book of that title) clearly uses it when the radio shrink (played by Rob Reiner) is doing his program. He refers to it as an African proverb and first states it in an African language, then in English. It was not new to me when I heard it in the movie, but I don't know when I first watched the movie. In what appears to be the introduction to the book (see http://www.happinessonline.org/LoveAndHelpChildren/p12.htm) Clinton says, "I chose that old African proverb to title my book". I don't have any cites, but I think I'd heard it in child-rearing contexts ten or fifteen years before her book came out. (My daughter was born in 1978, which should give you some idea of the time frame for my primary attention to such things.)

Bolding of some quotesEdit

Is there any reason why certain quotes are in a bold type face? 128.239.147.115 23:30, 19 November 2007 (UTC)albwus

Clearly, this is an expression of the editors' own opinions. I will change it. Steve Dufour 22:25, 29 November 2007 (UTC)

Unsourced quotes removedEdit

Wikipedia policy says that unsourced material about a living person that could be harmful should be removed from an article, and I am guessing that Wikiquote has the same kind of policy. It seems to me that since she is running for office any of these unsourced quotes could be harmful to her since some people might disagree with them or use them in the wrong way. I hope that nobody will object if I remove them. Thanks. I just did the same for Barack Obama's page, so I am not taking sides. Steve Dufour 22:25, 29 November 2007 (UTC)

So Hillary Roddom Clinton takes over for Bill Clinton? --Cosby 17:21, 4 March 2008 (UTC)

Sourced QuotesEdit

The sourced quotes in the pre-presidential section are just rumors pedaled from hatchet-job books written in the 90's. They have no place here and do not accurately reflect Hillary Clinton, as they are not even accurately sourced in the books where they originate. Just tabloid trash.

It seems the last two External Links are just more of the tabloid trash. I don't think they belong there if the quotes themselves didn't belong on the page. I'm going to pull them. If a link to this material really is needed, I would recommend the Scopes page that dissects this collection instead.