Last modified on 7 February 2014, at 01:40

Talk:Fyodor Dostoevsky

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"The second half of a man's life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half."

In the french page, this quote is listed as coming from the book "Les demons" (sthg like "the devils"). Here it is listed as "attributed to FD". One could chek in the book. Un lievre 11:32, 9 February 2006 (UTC)

" A fool, who has admitted he is a fool, is not a fool anymore. "

It seems they've missed this one, huh?

"Furnace of Doubt" QuoteEdit

I am moving this quote from "The Brothers Karamazov" into "Unsourced" since is is not in The Brothers Karamazov (you can search for it here [1]). It appears to come from Dostoevsky talking about The Brothers Karamazov (the Devil uses the phrase "crucible of doubt" in Ivan's dream). It is cited all over the internet as from The Brothers Karamazov but the only two places I've seen what appear to be good references to the quote are here: [2] and [3]. Both of those have the same quote but with some differences in translation (ie. "crucible"). I can't seem to find any more information on the "notebook" so I leave it as unsourced, hoping someone else knows more about it.KyleT

UnsourcedEdit

Wikiquote no longer allows unsourced quotations, and they are in process of being removed from our pages (see Wikiquote:Limits on quotations); but if you can provide a reliable and precise source for any quote on this list please move it to Fyodor Dostoevsky. --Antiquary 12:57, 28 February 2009 (UTC)

  • There are only two books written: Someone goes on a journey, or a stranger comes to town.
  • There is nothing easier than lopping off heads and nothing harder than developing ideas.
  • There is only one thing that I dread: not to be worthy of my sufferings.
  • The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.
  • Money is coined liberty.
  • I say let the world go to hell, but I should always have my tea.
    • Notes from Underground

One more quote?Edit

"Man needs the unfathomable and the infinite just as much as he does the small planet which he inhabits." Is this really Dostoevsky? If yes, from where?