Stokely Carmichael

Stokely Carmichael (June 29, 1941November 15, 1998), also known as Kwame Ture, was a Black Power and Pan-Africanist activist born in Trinidad, moved to the United States, then later in his life, Guinea. Leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Black Panthers.

SourcedEdit

  • You see that honky McNamara on television? He ain't nothing but a racist. He says, "Yes, we are going to draft thirty percent of the Negroes in the Army. This is where they can have equal opportunity. Yeah. Yes… yes it's true that they are only ten percent of the population, but this is a better chance for them." When that honky talk about drafting thirty percent black people, he's talking about black urban removal—nothing else. Instructional Resource Center, University of Washington
    • During a speech at Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • [T]hey Head Start, Upward Lift, Bootstrap, and Upward Bound us into white society, 'cause they don’t want to face the real problem which is a man is poor for one reason and one reason only: 'cause he does not have money -- period. If you want to get rid of poverty, you give people money -- period.
  • "Dr. King’s policy was that nonviolence would achieve the gains for black people in the United States. His major assumption was that if you are nonviolent, if you suffer, your opponent will see your suffering and will be moved to change his heart. That’s very good. He only made one fallacious assumption: In order for nonviolence to work, your opponent must have a conscience. The United States has none."
  • The death of Che Guevara places a responsibility on all revolutionaries of the World to redouble their decision to fight on to the final defeat of Imperialism. That is why in essence Che Guevara is not dead, his ideas are with us.
    • in (1967), as quoted in Andrew Sinclair's Viva Che!: The Strange Death and Life of Che Guevara

External linksEdit

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Last modified on 20 February 2014, at 17:11