Stephen Vincent Benét

My knowledge made me happy — it was like a fire in my heart. Most of all, I liked to hear of the Old Days and the stories of the gods.
Life can be lost without vision but not lost by death, lost by not caring, willing, going on beyond the ragged edge of fortitude to something more — something no man has ever seen...

Stephen Vincent Benét (22 July 189813 March 1943) was an American author, poet, short story writer and novelist.

QuotesEdit

I shall rise and pass.
Bury my heart at Wounded Knee.
  • I shall not rest quiet in Montparnasse.
    I shall not lie easy at Winchelsea.
    You may bury my body in Sussex grass,
    You may bury my tongue at Champmédy.
    I shall not be there. I shall rise and pass.
    Bury my heart at Wounded Knee.
    • "American Names" (1931)

Young Adventure (1918)Edit

Full text online at Project Gutenberg

The Quality of CourageEdit

And yet I strove — and I was fire and ice — and fire and ice were one in one vast hunger of desire.
There was no pain when I awoke,
No pain at all. Rest, like a goad,
Spurred my eyes open — and light broke
Upon them like a million swords:
And she was there. There are no words.
Heaven is for a moment's span.
And ever.
  • The iron ice stung like a goad,
    Slashing the torn shoes from my feet,
    And all the air was bitter sleet.

    And all the land was cramped with snow,
    Steel-strong and fierce and glimmering wan,
    Like pale plains of obsidian.
    And yet I strove — and I was fire
    And ice — and fire and ice were one
    In one vast hunger of desire.

  • Was it not better so to lie?
    The fight was done. Even gods tire
    Of fighting...
    My way was the wrong.
    Now I should drift and drift along
    To endless quiet, golden peace...
    And let the tortured body cease.

    And then a light winked like an eye.
    . . . And very many miles away
    A girl stood at a warm, lit door,
    Holding a lamp. Ray upon ray
    It cloaked the snow with perfect light.
    And where she was there was no night
    Nor could be, ever.
    God is sure,
    And in his hands are things secure.

  • It is not given me to trace
    The lovely laughter of that face
    ,
    Like a clear brook most full of light,
    Or olives swaying on a height,
    So silver they have wings, almost;
    Like a great word once known and lost
    And meaning all things.
    Nor her voice
    A happy sound where larks rejoice,
    Her body, that great loveliness,
    The tender fashion of her dress,
    I may not paint them.
    These I see,
    Blazing through all eternity,
    A fire-winged sign, a glorious tree!
  • She stood there, and at once I knew
    The bitter thing that I must do.
    There could be no surrender now;
    Though Sleep and Death were whispering low.
  • Life was a storm to wander through.
    I took the wrong way. Good and well,
    At least my feet sought out not Hell!
  • I crawled. I could not speak or see
    Save dimly.
    The ice glared like fire,
    A long bright Hell of choking cold,
    And each vein was a tautened wire,
    Throbbing with torture — and I crawled.
    My hands were wounds.
    So I attained
    The second Hell.
  • I stumbled, slipped... and all was gone
    That I had gained.
    Once more I lay
    Before the long bright Hell of ice.
    And still the light was far away.
    There was red mist before my eyes
    Or I could tell you how I went
    Across the swaying firmament,
    A glittering torture of cold stars,
    And how I fought in Titan wars...
    And died... and lived again upon
    The rack... and how the horses strain
    When their red task is nearly done. . .

    I only know that there was Pain,
    Infinite and eternal Pain.
    And that I fell — and rose again.

  • There was no pain when I awoke,
    No pain at all. Rest, like a goad,
    Spurred my eyes open — and light broke
    Upon them like a million swords:
    And she was there. There are no words.

    Heaven is for a moment's span.
    And ever.

  • Oh dear and laughing, lost to me,
    Hidden in grey Eternity,
    I shall attain, with burning feet,
    To you and to the mercy-seat!
    The ages crumble down like dust,
    Dark roses, deviously thrust
    And scattered in sweet wine — but I,
    I shall lift up to you my cry,
    And kiss your wet lips presently
    Beneath the ever-living Tree.
  • This in my heart I keep for goad!
    Somewhere, in Heaven she walks that road.
    Somewhere... in Heaven... she walks... that... road...

The Lover in HellEdit

There's one blue patch no smoke dares touch. Sky, clear, ineffable, alive with light, Always the same...
  • Eternally the choking steam goes up
    From the black pools of seething oil...
  • For ever... well... it droops the mouth. Till I
    Look up.
    There's one blue patch no smoke dares touch.
    Sky, clear, ineffable, alive with light,
    Always the same...
    Before, I never knew
    Rest and green peace.
  • She is all peace, all quiet,
    All passionate desires, the eloquent thunder
    Of new, glad suns, shouting aloud for joy
    ,
    Over fresh worlds and clean, trampling the air
    Like stooping hawks, to the long wind of horns,
    Flung from the bastions of Eternity...
    And she is the low lake, drowsy and gentle,
    And good words spoken from the tongues of friends,
    And calmness in the evening, and deep thoughts,
    Falling like dreams from the stars' solemn mouths.
    All these.

Winged ManEdit

Forever we shall see thee rising thus, See the first supernal glory, not the ruin hideous.
  • The moon, a sweeping scimitar, dipped in the stormy straits,
    The dawn, a crimson cataract, burst through the eastern gates,
    The cliffs were robed in scarlet, the sands were cinnabar,
    Where first two men spread wings for flight and dared the hawk afar.
  • Icarus, Icarus, though the end is piteous,
    Yet forever, yea, forever we shall see thee rising thus,
    See the first supernal glory, not the ruin hideous.
  • On the highest steeps of Space he will have his dwelling-place,
    In those far, terrific regions where the cold comes down like Death
    Gleams the red glint of his pinions, smokes the vapor of his breath.

    Floating downward, very clear, still the echoes reach the ear
    Of a little tune he whistles and a little song he sings,
    Mounting, mounting still, triumphant, on his torn and broken wings!

Litany for Dictatorships (1935)Edit

Full text online
For all those beaten, for the broken heads, the fosterless, the simple, the oppressed...
For those slain at once.
For those living through the months and years
Enduring, watching, hoping...
  • For all those beaten, for the broken heads,
    The fosterless, the simple, the oppressed,
    The ghosts in the burning city of our time…
  • For those who still said "Red Front" or "God save the Crown!"
    And for those who were not courageous
    But were beaten nevertheless.

    For those who spit out the bloody stumps of their teeth
      Quietly in the hall,
    Sleep well on stone or iron, watch for the time
    And kill the guard in the privy before they die,
    Those with the deep-socketed eyes and the lamp burning.
  • For those slain at once.
    For those living through the months and years
    Enduring, watching, hoping
    , going each day
    To the work or the queue for meat or the secret club,
    Living meanwhile, begetting children, smuggling guns,
    And found and killed at the end like rats in a drain.
For all those strangled, gelded or merely starved to make perfect states...
  • For those who planned and were leaders and were beaten
    And for those, humble and stupid, who had no plan
    But were denounced, but were angry, but told a joke,
    But could not explain, but were sent away to the camp,
    But had their bodies shipped back in the sealed coffins,
    "Died of pneumonia." "Died trying to escape."
  • For those denounced by their smug, horrible children
    For a peppermint-star and the praise of the Perfect State,
    For all those strangled, gelded or merely starved
    To make perfect states
    ; for the priest hanged in his cassock,
    The Jew with his chest crushed in and his eyes dying,
    The revolutionist lynched by the private guards
    To make perfect states, in the names of the perfect states.
  • Talking so quietly; when they hear the cars
    And the knock at the door, and they look at each other quickly
    And the woman goes to the door with a stiff face,
      Smoothing her dress.
    "We are all good citizens here. We believe in the Perfect State."
We are all good citizens here. We believe in the Perfect State.
  • We heard the shots in the night
    But nobody knew next day what the trouble was
    And a man must go to his work.

    So I didn't see him
    For three days, then, and me near out of my mind
    And all the patrols on the streets with their dirty guns
    And when he came back, he looked drunk, and the blood was on him.
  • For the women who mourn their dead in the secret night,
    For the children taught to keep quiet, the old children,
    The children spat-on at school.
    For the wrecked laboratory,
    The gutted house, the dunged picture, the pissed-in well
    The naked corpse of Knowledge flung in the square
    And no man lifting a hand and no man speaking.
Oh, crack your mind for his name! Faceless as water, naked as the dust...
  • For the cold of the pistol-butt and the bullet's heat,
    For the ropes that choke, the manacles that bind,
    The huge voice, metal, that lies from a thousand tubes
    And the stuttering machine-gun that answers all.
This is he. This is the man they ate at the green table putting their gloves on ere they touched the meat.
  • For the man crucified on the crossed machine guns
    Without name, without ressurection, without stars,
    His dark head heavy with death and his flesh long sour
    With the smell of his many prisons — John Smith, John Doe,
    John Nobody — oh, crack your mind for his name!
    Faceless as water, naked as the dust,
    Dishonored as the earth the gas-shells poison
    And barbarous with portent.
      This is he.
    This is the man they ate at the green table
    Putting their gloves on ere they touched the meat.
    This is the fruit of war, the fruit of peace,
    The ripeness of invention, the new lamb,
    The answer to the wisdom of the wise.
    And still he hangs, and still he will not die
    And still, on the steel city of our years
    The light falls and the terrible blood streams down.
We thought we were done with these things but we were wrong.
We thought, because we had power, we had wisdom.
  • We thought we were done with these things but we were wrong.
    We thought, because we had power, we had wisdom.
    We thought the long train would run to the end of Time.
    We thought the light would increase.
    Now the long train stands derailed and the bandits loot it.
    Now the boar and the asp have power in our time.
    Now the night rolls back on the West and the night is solid.
    Our fathers and ourselves sowed dragon's teeth.
    Our children know and suffer the armed men.

The Devil and Daniel Webster (1937)Edit

The Devil and Daniel Webster (Full text online)
Neighbor, how stands the Union?
He was talking about the things that make a country a country, and a man a man. And he began with the simple things that everybody's known and felt...
He knew that once you bested anybody like Mr. Scratch in fair fight, his power on you was gone. And he could see that Mr. Scratch knew it too.
  • It's a story they tell in the border country, where Massachusetts joins Vermont and New Hampshire.
    Yes, Dan'l Webster's dead — or, at least, they buried him. But every time there's a thunderstorm around Marshfield, they say you can hear his rolling voice in the hollows of the sky.
    And they say that if you go to his grave and speak loud and clear, "Dan'l Webster — Dan'l Webster!" the ground'll begin to shiver and the trees begin to shake. And after a while you'll hear a deep voice saying, "Neighbor, how stands the Union?" Then you better answer the Union stands as she stood, rock-bottomed and copper-sheathed, one and indivisible, or he's liable to rear right out of the ground. At least, that's what I was told when I was a youngster.
  • A man with a mouth like a mastiff, a brow like a mountain and eyes like burning anthracite — that was Dan'l Webster in his prime. And the biggest case he argued never got written down in the books, for he argued it against the devil, nip and tuck and no holds barred. And this is the way I used to hear it told.
  • If two New Hampshiremen aren't a match for the devil, we might as well give the country back to the Indians.
  • When the first wrong was done to the first Indian, I was there. When the first slaver put out for the Congo, I stood on her deck. Am I not in your books and stories and beliefs, from the first settlements on? Am I not spoken of, still, in every church in New England? 'Tis true the North claims me for a Southerner and the South for a Northerner, but I am neither. I am merely an honest American like yourself — and of the best descent — for, to tell the truth, Mr. Webster, though I don't like to boast of it, my name is older in this country than yours.
    • Mr. Scratch
  • Finally, it was time for him to get up on his feet, and he did so, all ready to bust out with lightning and denunciations. But before he started he looked over the judge and jury for a moment, such being his custom. And he noticed the glitter in their eyes was twice as strong as before, and they all leaned forward. Like hounds just before they get the fox, they thickened as he watched them. Then he saw what he'd been about to do, and he wiped his forehead, as a man might who's just escaped falling into a pit in the dark.
    For it was him they'd come for, not only Jabez Stone. He read it in the glitter of their eyes and in the way the stranger hid his mouth with one hand. And if he fought them with their own weapons, he'd fall into their power; he knew that, though he couldn't have told you how.
    It was his own anger and horror that burned in their eyes; and he'd have to wipe that out or the case was lost. He stood there for a moment, his black eyes burning like anthracite. And then he began to speak.
  • He started off in a low voice, though you could hear every word. They say he could call on the harps of the blessed when he chose. And this was just as simple and easy as a man could talk. But he didn't start out by condemning or reviling. He was talking about the things that make a country a country, and a man a man.
    And he began with the simple things that everybody's known and felt — the freshness of a fine morning when you're young, and the taste of food when you're hungry, and the new day that's every day when you're a child. He took them up and he turned them in his hands. They were good things for any man. But without freedom, they sickened.
    And when he talked of those enslaved, and the sorrows of slavery, his voice got like a big bell. He talked of the early days of America and the men who had made those days. It wasn't a spread-eagle speech, but he made you see it. He admitted all the wrong that had ever been done. But he showed how, out of the wrong and the right, the suffering and the starvations, something new had come. And everybody had played a part in it, even the traitors.
  • Then he turned to Jabez Stone and showed him as he was — an ordinary man who'd had hard luck and wanted to change it. And, because he'd wanted to change it, now he was going to be punished for all eternity. And yet there was good in Jabez Stone, and he showed that good. He was hard and mean, in some ways, but he was a man. There was sadness in being a man, but it was a proud thing too. And he showed what the pride of it was till you couldn't help feeling it. Yes, even in hell, if a man was a man, you'd know it. And he wasn't pleading for any one person any more, though his voice rang like an organ. He was telling the story and the failures and the endless journey of mankind. They got tricked and trapped and bamboozled, but it was a great journey. And no demon that was ever foaled could know the inwardness of it — it took a man to do that.
    The fire began to die on the hearth and the wind before morning to blow. The light was getting gray in the room when Dan'l Webster finished. And his words came back at the end to New Hampshire ground, and the one spot of land that each man loves and clings to. He painted a picture of that, and to each one of that jury he spoke of things long forgotten. For his voice could search the heart, and that was his gift and his strength. And to one, his voice was like the forest and its secrecy, and to another like the sea and the storms of the sea; and one heard the cry of his lost nation in it, and another saw a little harmless scene he hadn't remembered for years. But each saw something. And when Dan'l Webster finished he didn't know whether or not he'd saved Jabez Stone. But he knew he'd done a miracle. For the glitter was gone from the eyes of the judge and jury, and, for the moment, they were men again, and knew they were men.
  • Perhaps 'tis not strictly in accordance with the evidence ... but even the damned may salute the eloquence of Mr. Webster.
    • Mr. Scratch
  • He knew that once you bested anybody like Mr. Scratch in fair fight, his power on you was gone. And he could see that Mr. Scratch knew it too.
  • A soul. A soul is nothing. Can you see it, smell it, touch it? No.
  • You will have money and all that money can buy.

By the Waters of Babylon (1937)Edit

First published as "The Place of the Gods" in The Saturday Evening Post (31 July 1937), Benét changed the title when selecting works for the anthology Thirteen O'Clock: Stories of Several Worlds (1937) - Full text online
When gods war with gods, they use weapons we do not know...
  • The north and the west and the south are good hunting ground, but it is forbidden to go east. It is forbidden to go to any of the Dead Places except to search for metal and then he who touches the metal must be a priest or the son of a priest. Afterwards, both the man and the metal must be purified. These are the rules and the laws; they are well made. It is forbidden to cross the great river and look upon the place that was the Place of the Gods — this is most strictly forbidden. We do not even say its name though we know its name. It is there that spirits live, and demons — it is there that there are the ashes of the Great Burning. These things are forbidden — they have been forbidden since the beginning of time.
  • If the hunters think we do all things by chants and spells, they may believe so — it does not hurt them. I was taught how to read in the old books and how to make the old writings — that was hard and took a long time. My knowledge made me happy — it was like a fire in my heart. Most of all, I liked to hear of the Old Days and the stories of the gods.
  • I went fasting, as is the law. My body hurt but not my heart. When the dawn came, I was out of sight of the village. I prayed and purified myself, waiting for a sign. The sign was an eagle. It flew east.
    Sometimes signs are sent by bad spirits. I waited again on the flat rock, fasting, taking no food. I was very still — I could feel the sky above me and the earth beneath. I waited till the sun was beginning to sink. Then three deer passed in the valley going east — they did not mind me or see me. There was a white fawn with them — a very great sign.
  • My people are the Hill People. They are the men.
    I go into the Dead Places but I am not slain.
    I take the metal from the Dead Places but I am not blasted.
    I travel upon the god-roads and am not afraid.
  • Never have I been so much alone — I tried to think of my knowledge, but it was a squirrel's heap of winter nuts. There was no strength in my knowledge any more and I felt small and naked as a new-hatched bird — alone upon the great river, the servant of the gods.
I knew then that they had been men, neither gods nor demons. It is a great knowledge, hard to tell and believe. They were men — they went a dark road, but they were men.
  • How shall I tell what I saw? The towers are not all broken — here and there one still stands, like a great tree in a forest, and the birds nest high. But the towers themselves look blind, for the gods are gone. I saw a fishhawk, catching fish in the river. I saw a little dance of white butterflies over a great heap of broken stones and columns. I went there and looked about me — there was a carved stone with cut — letters, broken in half. I can read letters but I could not understand these. They said UBTREAS. There was also the shattered image of a man or a god. It had been made of white stone and he wore his hair tied back like a woman's. His name was ASHING, as I read on the cracked half of a stone. I thought it wise to pray to ASHING, though I do not know that god.
  • I went north — I did not try to hide myself. When a god or a demon saw me, then I would die, but meanwhile I was no longer afraid. My hunger for knowledge burned in me — there was so much that I could not understand.
  • Now I tell what is very strong magic. I woke in the midst of the night. When I woke, the fire had gone out and I was cold. It seemed to me that all around me there were whisperings and voices. I closed my eyes to shut them out. Some will say that I slept again, but I do not think that I slept. I could feel the spirits drawing my spirit out of my body as a fish is drawn on a line.
    Why should I lie about it? I am a priest and the son of a priest. If there are spirits, as they say, in the small Dead Places near us, what spirits must there not be in that great Place of the Gods? And would not they wish to speak? After such long years? I know that I felt myself drawn as a fish is drawn on a line. I had stepped out of my body — I could see my body asleep in front of the cold fire, but it was not I. I was drawn to look out upon the city of the gods.
    It should have been dark, for it was night, but it was not dark. Everywhere there were lights — lines of light — circles and blurs of light — ten thousand torches would not have been the same. The sky itself was alight — you could barely see the stars for the glow in the sky. I thought to myself "This is strong magic" and trembled. There was a roaring in my ears like the rushing of rivers. Then my eyes grew used to the light and my ears to the sound. I knew that I was seeing the city as it had been when the gods were alive.
It is better the truth should come little by little...
  • When gods war with gods, they use weapons we do not know. It was fire falling out of the sky and a mist that poisoned. It was the time of the Great Burning and the Destruction. They ran about like ants in the streets of their city — poor gods, poor gods!
  • I knew then that they had been men, neither gods nor demons. It is a great knowledge, hard to tell and believe. They were men — they went a dark road, but they were men.
  • I have been in the Place of the Gods and seen it! Now slay me, if it is the law — but still I know they were men.
  • It is better the truth should come little by little. I have learned that, being a priest. Perhaps, in the old days, they ate knowledge too fast.
    Nevertheless, we make a beginning.
    it is not for the metal alone we go to the Dead Places now — there are the books and the writings. They are hard to learn. And the magic tools are broken — but we can look at them and wonder. At least, we make a beginning. And, when I am chief priest we shall go beyond the great river. We shall go to the Place of the Gods — the place newyork — not one man but a company. We shall look for the images of the gods and find the god ASHING and the others — the gods Lincoln and Biltmore and Moses. But they were men who built the city, not gods or demons. They were men. I remember the dead man's face. They were men who were here before us. We must build again.

A Child is Born (1942)Edit

A Child is Born : A Drama of The Nativity First broadcast on the NBC radio network (21 December 1942)
It's an old task — old as the human heart...
The time is — time. The place is anywhere.
The voices speak to you across the air
To say that once again a child is born.
I'm waiting. ... For something new and strange,
Something I've dreamt about in some deep sleep,
Truer than any waking...
Something begins.
Something is full of change and sparkling stars.
Something is loosed that changes all the world.
God pity us indeed, for we are human,
And do not always see
The vision when it comes, the shining change,
Or, if we see it, do not follow it,
Because it is too hard, too strange, too new...
Rise up! The loves we had were not enough.
Something is loosed to change the shaken world,
And with it we must change!
He brings to all,
The thought, the wish, the dream of brotherhood,
Never and never to be wholly lost...
Though he die, his word shall grow like wheat
And every time a child is born,
In pain and love and freedom hardly won,
Born and gone forth to help and aid mankind,
There will be women with a right to say
"Gloria, gloria in excelsis deo!
A child is born!"
  • I'm your narrator. It's my task to say
    Just where and how things happen in our play,
    Set the bare stage with words instead of props
    And keep on talking till the curtain drops.
    ...
    It's an old task — old as the human heart,
    Old as those bygone players and their art
    Who, in old days when faith was nearer earth,
    Played out the mystery of Jesus' birth
    In hall or village green or market square
    For all who chose to come and see them there,
    And, if they knew that King Herod, in his crown,
    Was really Wat, the cobbler of the town,
    And Tom, the fool, played Abraham the Wise,
    They did not care. They saw with other eyes.
    The story was their own — not far away,
    As real as if it happened yesterday,
    Full of all awe and wonder yet so near,
    A marvelous thing that could have happened here
    In their own town — a star that could have blazed
    On their own shepherds, leaving them amazed,
    Frightened and questioning and following still
    To the bare stable — and the miracle.
    • Narrator
  • The time is — time. The place is anywhere.
    The voices speak to you across the air
    To say that once again a child is born.
    A child is born.
    • Narrator
  • He shall not come to conquest,
    The conquest of kings,
    But in the bare stable
    He shall judge all things.
    • Innkeeper's wife, singing a song of prophecies.
  • Outcasts of war, misfits, rebellious souls,
    Seekers of some vague kingdom in the stars —
    They hide out in the hills and stir up trouble,
    Call themselves prophets, too, and prophesy
    That something new is coming to the world,
    The Lord knows what!

    Well, it's a long time coming,
    And, meanwhile, we're the wheat between the stones.

    • Innkeeper
  • I'm waiting. ... For something new and strange,
    Something I've dreamt about in some deep sleep,
    Truer than any waking
    ,
    Heard about, long ago, so long ago,
    In sunshine and the summer grass of childhood,
    When the sky seems so near.
    I do not know its shape, its will, its purpose
    And yet all day its will has been upon me,
    More real than any voice I ever heard,
    More real than yours or mine or our dead child's,
    More real than all the voices there upstairs,
    Brawling above their cups, more real than light.
    And there is light in it and fire and peace,
    Newness of heart and strangeness like a sword,
    And all my body trembles under it,
    And yet I do not know.
    • Innkeeper's wife
  • I am not tired.
    I am expectant as a runner is
    Before a race, a child before a feast day,
    A woman at the gates of life and death,
    Expectant for us all, for all of us
    Who live and suffer on this little earth
    With such small brotherhood. Something begins.
    Something is full of change and sparkling stars.
    Something is loosed that changes all the world.
    • Innkeeper's wife
  • Something begins, begins;
    Starlit and sunlit, something walks abroad
    In flesh and spirit and fire.
    Something is loosed to change the shaken world.
    • Innkeeper's wife
  • God pity us indeed, for we are human,
    And do not always see
    The vision when it comes, the shining change,
    Or, if we see it, do not follow it,
    Because it is too hard, too strange, too new,
    Too unbelievable, too difficult,
    Warring too much with common, easy ways
    ,
    And now I know this, standing in this light,
    Who have been half alive these many years,
    Brooding on my own sorrow, my own pain,
    Saying "I am a barren bough. Expect
    Nor fruit nor blossom from a barren bough."
    • Innkeeper's wife
  • Life is not lost by dying! Life is lost
    Minute by minute, day by dragging day,
    In all the thousand, small, uncaring ways,
    The smooth appeasing compromises of time,
    Which are King Herod and King Herod's men,
    Always and always. Life can be
    Lost without vision but not lost by death,
    Lost by not caring, willing, going on
    Beyond the ragged edge of fortitude
    To something more — something no man has ever seen.

    You who love money, you who love yourself,
    You who love bitterness, and I who loved
    and lost and thought I could not love again,
    And all the people of this little town,
    Rise up! The loves we had were not enough.
    Something is loosed to change the shaken world,
    And with it we must change!
    • Innkeeper's wife
  • I see that I've said something you don't like,
    Something uncouth and bold and terrifying,
    And yet, I'll tell you this:
    It won't be till each one of us is willing,
    Not you, not me, but every one of us,
    To hang upon a cross for every man
    Who suffers, starves and dies,
    Fight his sore battles as they were our own,
    And help him from the darkness and the mire,
    That there will be no crosses and no tyrants,
    No Herods and no slaves.
    • Dismas, the thief.
  • We are the earth his word must sow like wheat
    And, if it finds no earth, it cannot grow.

    We are his earth, the mortal and the dying,
    Led by no star — the sullen and the slut,
    The thief, the selfish man, the barren woman,
    Who have betrayed him once and will betray him,
    Forget his words, be great a moment's space
    Under the strokes of chance,
    And then sink back into our small affairs.
    And yet, unless we go, his message fails.
    • Innkeeper's wife
  • He brings man's freedom in his hands,
    Not as a coin that may be spent or lost
    But as a living fire within the heart,
    Never quite quenched — because he brings to all,
    The thought, the wish, the dream of brotherhood,
    Never and never to be wholly lost,
    The water and the bread of the oppressed,
    The stay and succor of the resolute,
    The harness of the valiant and the brave,
    The new word that has changed the shaken world.
    And, though he die, his word shall grow like wheat
    And every time a child is born,
    In pain and love and freedom hardly won,
    Born and gone forth to help and aid mankind,
    There will be women with a right to say
    "Gloria, gloria in excelsis deo!
    A child is born!"
    • Innkeeper's wife

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Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 02:05