Slovenian proverbs

Slovenian proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from Slovenia and other parts of the world where Slovenian is spoken.

DEdit

  • Dober pocitek je pol dela.
    • Idiomatic translation: Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Dvema gospodarjema ne moreš služiti.
    • Translation: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • English equivalent: Also, Nobody can serve two masters.
    • Meaning: One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

KEdit

  • Kdor ne dela, je brez jela.
    • Translation: He who does not work is without food.
    • Idiomatic translation: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work.
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

JEdit

  • kmar mlade ne vedó, jim stare provedó.
    • Translation: What kind of parents, such children.
    • English equivalent: As the old cock crows, so crows the young.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 

KEdit

  • Kakršna mati, taka hči.
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kakršen oče, tak sin.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kamna, ki se obrača, se ne prime mah.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A rolling stone gathers no moss.
    • Meaning: "There are a Set of People in the World of fo unfettled and reftleis a Temper, and such Admirers of Novelty, that they can never be long pleafed with one way of’ living, no more than to continue long in one Habitation; but before they are well enter’d upon one Bufinefs, dip into another, and before they are well fettled in one Habitation, remove to another; fo that they are always bufily beginning to live, but by reafon of Ficklenefs and Impatience, never arrive at a way of living: fuch Perfons fall under the Doom of this Proverb, which is delign’d to fix the Volatility of their Tempers, by laying before them the ill Confequences of fuch Ficklenefs and Inconltancy."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Source for proverbs and meaning:Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "14". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 100. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Kdor drugemu jamo koplje sam vanjo pade.
    • Translation: He who digs a hole for someone else, ends up in it.
    • Interpretation: If you have an insidious plan for someone it will backwire on to you.
    • Pogačnik, Faganel (2000). Zbornik o Janezu Svetokriškem: prispevki s simpozija v Vipavskem Križu, 22.-24. aprila 1999. Slovenska akademija znanosti in umetnosti. p. 344. ISBN 1. 
  • Kdor prej pride prej melje.
    • Translation: The one who arrives the first, grinds the first.
    • English equivalent: First come, first served.
    • Meaning: "Those who arrive or apply earliest are most likely to get what they want from a limited supply of things, such as tickets, discounted goods or refreshments."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 88. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Ljubljanski zvon. Knjigarna Tiskovne Zadruge R.Z.Z.O.Z.. 1929. p. 30. 
  • Kdor redko sejé, bo redko žel.
    • Translation: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Krava pri gobcu molze.
    • Idiomatic translation: It's by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • Meaning: Whatever input you give, whatever outpot you get.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 

LEdit

  • Lepa beseda lepo mesto najde.
    • Translation: Nice word finds a nice place.
    • Interpretation: If you act politely and nicely, you will achieve much more than with bad attitude.
    • Chapman (1999). Pet jezikov ljubezni. Tuma. p. 48. 
  • Laž ima kratke noge.
    • Translation: Lie has short legs.
    • Interpretation: The truth always comes out.
    • Herbaj, Lapornik, Savkovič, Balmazovič, (Celje). (2002). Lažima kratke noge. Osnovna šola Hudinja. 

MEdit

  • Molk je znak priznanja.
    • "Those who do not reply to a request or accusation, or who raise no objection to something said or done, are assumed to have acquiesced."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 244. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "94". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 430. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Ni treba prilivati olja v ogenj.
    • Translation: You should not add oil to the fire.
    • English equivalent: Don't add fuel to the fire.
    • Meaning: One should not make a bad situation even worse by an improper remark.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 338. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

OEdit

  • Otro, norci in pijanci govore resnico.
    • English equivalent: Children, fools and drunken men tell the truth.
    • Meaning: Children and fools have no inhibition, and alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

PEdit

  • Prijatelja spoznaš v nesreĉi.
    • Idiomatic translation: A friend is known in adversity, like gold is known in fire.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 159. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

VEdit

  • Več glav več ve.
    • Translation: More heads know more.
    • Interpretation: A group of people are more wise than an individual.
    • English equivalent: The voice of the people is the voice of god.
    • Kovač, Hribar (2005). Večglav večve: informacijski kažipot. Knjižnica Jožeta Udoviča. 
  • Velike ribe male žro.
    • Translation: Big fish eat little fish.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Vsak je svoje sreče kovač.
    • Translation: Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
    • English equivalent: Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
    • Meaning: In shaping one's own fortune one should not rely on the help of others, as they are also concerned mainly about their own matters.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 388. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Vsaka jabolka padejo blizu stebla.
    • Idiomatic translation: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

ZEdit

  • Z enim udarcem ne podreš hrasta.
    • Idiomatic translation: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • Meaning: A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
Last modified on 17 March 2014, at 10:29