Romansch proverbs

Romansch language proverbs – one of the four official nation languages in Switzerland.

BEdit

  • Chi bain cumaninza, ais a mited la l'ouvra.
    • Translation: He who starts well is in the middle of the work.
    • English equivalent: Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

CEdit

  • Chi nu voul lavurer, nu stu neir manger.
    • Translation: He who does not work is without food.
    • Idiomatic translation: He that will not work, shall not eat.
    • Meaning: Without due effort one is not entitled to the fruits of the work.
    • Source for proverb and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 256. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Cun üna botta nun as schmerdscha üna planta.
    • Idiomatic translation: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • Meaning: A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

EEdit

  • En aua turbla ei bien pescar.
    • Translation: It is good fishing in streamy water.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • Meaning: In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

IEdit

  • Il früt nu crouda dalöntsch da la planta.
    • Idiomatic translation: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Il pesch grand ho adüna maglio il pitschen.
    • Translation: Big fish eat little fish.
    • Idiomatic translation: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

MEdit

  • Masüra trais jadas e taglia üna.
    • Idiomatic translation: Measure thrice, cut once.
    • Meaning: One should always act only after due consideration. A hasty action may involve an improper consideration of important aspects.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Munts e vals stan salda, ma la glieud s'inscuntra.
    • Translation: Mountains and valleys stand firm but people meet.
    • Idiomatic translation: A mountain never meets a mountain, but a man meets a man.
    • Meaning: There are some things/events that are impossible, like an encounter of mountains, but there is always a chance for people to meet. or Once can always find a possibility for revenge.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 213. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Mincha sabi practicant ei dilg glück sieu sez fabricant.
    • Translation: Every man is the maker of his own fortune.
    • English equivalent: Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
    • Meaning: In shaping one's own fortune one should not rely on the help of others, as they are also concerned mainly about their own matters.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 388. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

NEdit

  • Nu metter fö inua chi'd ais già.
    • Translation: You should not add oil to the fire.
    • English equivalent: Don't add fuel to the fire.
    • Meaning: One should not make a bad situation even worse by an improper remark.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 338. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

PEdit

  • Povertà nun ais viltà.
    • Translation: A swallow does not make a summer.
    • Meaning: One occurrence is no indication that a major change is taking place.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1030. ISBN 0415096243. 

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 3 July 2013, at 05:32