Quintilian

It is feeling and force of imagination that makes us eloquent.

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. 35c. 100), was a Roman rhetorician. His De Institutione Oratoria was widely referred to in medieval schools of rhetoric and in Renaissance writing.

SourcedEdit

De Institutione Oratoria (c. 95 AD)Edit

  • It is much easier to try one's hand at many things than to concentrate one's powers on one thing.
    • Book I, 12, 7.
  • Mendacem memorem esse oportet
    • A liar should have a good memory.
    • Book IV, 2, line 91. see also: "Liars ought to have good memories", Algernon Sidney, Discourses on Government, chapter ii, section xv.
  • Vain hopes are often like the dreams of those who wake.
    • Book VI, 2, line 30. see also: "For hope is but the dream of those that wake", Matthew Prior, Solomon on the Vanity of the World, book iii, line 102.
  • We should not write so that it is possible for [the reader] to understand us, but so that it is impossible for him to misunderstand us.
    • Book VIII, 2, 24.
  • Historia et scribitur ad narrandum non ad probandum.
    • History is written for the purpose of narration and not in order to give proof.
    • Book X, 1, line 31.
  • Nature herself has never attempted to effect great changes rapidly.
    • Book X, 3, 4.
  • Pectus est enim, quod disertos facit.
    • For it is feeling and force of imagination that makes us eloquent.
    • Book X, 7, line 15.

UnsourcedEdit

  • Non multa sed multum
    • not quantity but quality
  • Damnant quod non intellegunt.
    • They condemn what they do not understand.
  • Or who do not fit words to things, but seek irrelevant things which their words may fit.

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 17:54