Provençal proverbs

Proverbs from all Provençal speaking parts of the world.

BEdit

  • Beat qu dou ben d'autruc fa son aprenissagi.
    • Translation: It is easiest to learn from another mans damage.
    • English equivalent: Wise men learn by other men's mistakes, fools by their own.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 619. ISBN 0415096243. 

FEdit

  • Fa boòn pescar en aiga trobla.
    • Translation: It is good fishing in streamy water.
    • English equivalent: It is good fishing in troubled waters.
    • Meaning: In taking advantage of chaotic conditions one can easily serve one's own purposes.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 391. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Fa de necessitat vertu.
    • English equivalent: Make a virtue out of necessity.
    • Meaning: Acquiesce in doing something unpleasant with a show of grace because one must do it in any case.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1079. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Fau copa lou clos pèr avé l'amelo.

IEdit

  • Lou barbié piétadous fâi la vërmënoûzo.
    • English equivalent: Mild physician – putrid wounds.
    • Meaning: Telling harsh truths constructively (to yourself as well) and stern measures makes for a good figurative and literal cure.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1091. ISBN 0415096243. 

LEdit

  • L'aiglo non casso i mousco.
    • English equivalent: Eagles don't catch flies.
    • Meaning: "People of high rank are considered – or consider themselves – too important to deal with trivial things or lowly folk."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 66. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 25 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "230". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 216. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • L'us dau paire, l'efant l'aprend.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 170. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Lo gòs peis manja lo pichon.
    • Translation: Big fish eat little fish.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • Meaning: "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

MEdit

  • Mesura doás fes e copas qu'una.
    • English equivalent: Measure thrice, cut once.
    • Meaning: One should always act only after due consideration. A hasty action may involve an improper consideration of important aspects.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 420. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Mirgo que n'a qu'un trpu est bientôt prise.
    • English equivalent: It is a poor mouse that has only one hole.
    • Meaning: It is dangerous to always depend on just one thing, because if it fails you, you will not have any alternatives.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 375. ISBN 0415096243. 

NEdit

  • N'es pas tant pichon lou bouisson, qu'uno fes dou jourt non fasse ombro.
    • English equivalent: A bad bush is better than no shelter; Every hair casts its shadow; There is no little enemy.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 

PEdit

  • Parol de vendre la peau davant qu'avec la bestia.
    • English equivalent: Don't sell the skin till you have caught the bear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 641. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Pèr prene un toun, asardo uno meleto.
    • Translation: Who wants to win a gander, you need to weigh Drake.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1134. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Podètz pas servir dos mèstres.
    • Translation: Nobody can serve two masters.
    • English equivalent: Also, Nobody can serve two masters.
    • Meaning: One cannot serve two conflicting causes simultaneously. If this is attempted neither will be served properly.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 283. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

UEdit

  • Urós quau es artisan de sa fortuna.
    • Translation: Every man is the master of his own fortune.
    • English equivalent: Also, Every man is the smith of his own fortune.
    • Meaning: In shaping one's own fortune one should not rely on the help of others, as they are also concerned mainly about their own matters.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 388. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

VEdit

  • Vaut may istar soulet que mau accompagnat.
    • Translation: It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 572. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vieillos amours et vieil tizon, promptament ralumas sont.
    • English equivalent: Of soup and love the first is the best.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 825. ISBN 0415096243. 

QEdit

  • Quand lei cats i son pas, lei garris dançan.
    • Translation: When the cat is away, the mice dance on the floor.
    • English equivalent: If the cat is away, the mice play.
    • Meaning: "In the absence of the person in authority those under his control will often neglect the duties/rules imposed on them."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Martin H. Manser (2007). "17". The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 114. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. 
  • Quau vai souvent en casso, a la fin tuo la becasso.
    • Translation: The turtle who perserveres wins.
    • English equivalent: By perseverance the snail reached the arc.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 127. ISBN 0415096243. 

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 13 December 2013, at 16:22