Last modified on 2 September 2013, at 18:23

Peter Coad

Peter Coad (born December 30, 1953) is an American computer scientist, software entrepreneur and author of books on programming. He is notable for his role in defining what have come to be known as the UML colors, a color-coded notation chiefly useful for simplifying one's understanding of a design or model.

QuotesEdit

  • Archetypes, color, and components will forever change how you build Java models. We build Java models with teams of developers. In our day-to-day mentoring, we develop and try out new ideas and innovations that will help those developers excel at modeling.
    • Peter Coad, Jeff de Luca, and Eric Lefebvre. (1999) Java Modeling Color with Uml: Enterprise Components and Process with Cdrom. Prentice Hall PTR.

Object-oriented patterns. (1992)Edit

Peter Coad (1992) "Object-oriented patterns." Communications of the ACM 35.9 : 152-159.

  • Many fields use patterns in various ways: In music and literature, a pattern is the coherent structure or design of a song or book. In art, a pattern is the composition or plan of a work of graphic or plastic art. In architecture, a pattern is an architectural design or style. In psychology, a pattern is a thinking mechanism that is basic to the brain's operation, helping one to perceive things quickly. In archeology, a pattern is a group of phases having several distinguishing and fundamental features in common. In linguistics, a pattern is the manner in which smaller units of language are grouped into larger units...
    • p. 152
  • With each pattern, small piecework is standardized into a larger chunk or unit. Patterns become the building blocks for design and construction. Finding and applying patterns indicates progress in a field of human endeavor.
    • p. 152
  • Object-oriented methods tend to focus on the lowest-level building block: the class and its objects.
    • p. 152
  • A pattern is a fully realized form original, or model accepted or proposed for imitation. With patterns, small piecework is standardized into a larger chunk or unit. Patterns become the building blocks for design and construction. Finding and applying patterns indicates progress in a field of human endeavor.
    • p. 158

About Peter CoadEdit

  • The key books about object-oriented graphical modeling languages appeared between 1988 and 1992. Leading figures included Grady Booch [Booch,OOAD]; Peter Coad [Coad, OOA], [Coad, OOD]; Ivar Jacobson (Objectory) [Jacobson, OOSE]; Jim Odell [Odell]; Jim Rumbaugh (OMT) [Rumbaugh, insights], [Rumbaugh, OMT]; Sally Shlaer and Steve Mellor [Shlaer and Mellor, data], [Shlaer and Mellor, states] ; and Rebecca Wirfs-Brock (Responsibility Driven Design) [Wirfs-Brock].
    • Martin Fowler (2004) A Brief Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language. p. 7

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: